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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - February 11, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                WAR BOND SCORE 4th War Loan Quota Sales to Date Series E Quota Series E Sales Series E to Go Abilene Reporter WITHOUT OR OFFENSE TO OR FOES WE SKM CH WORLD KXACTLV COJ'.SV MORNING VOL. NO. 239 A TEXAS NEWSPAPER ABILENE, TEXAS, FRIDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 11, 1944 -EIGHTEEN PAGES Associated Press UP) Vntttd, Frets PRICE FIVE CENTS I azis increase Beach ssau .Reds Isolate, Wipe Out Nazis on Dnieper LONDON, Friday, Feb. troops have cut ojf several German groups from the main remnants of 1U crack Axis divisions trapped around Korsun in the Dnieper river bend and are Moscow announced today in a bulletin foreshadowing the climax of the biggest single Nazi disaster since Stalingrad. Associated 1'ress Moscow dispatches said (he exhausted Germans, once estimated at more than men, were being captured at an increasingly high rate, but also were dying in the same numbers under the merciless hammering of massed Russian artillery laying down rt cross-fire on the Germans within the constricted ring. Korsun itself, pivot of the _ survivors' lines, was reported D--II-. under Soviet artillery fire as DIIIK Ol I "I1 Japs Eliminated NEED MORE BUYINGOFE BONDS HERE tlic Russians yesterday drove to within seven mites of that stronghold at two points; the Germans' airstrips were gone; food supplies were ebbing to the vanishing point. A Tass broadcast from Moscow early today said Ihe German com- mander, U. Gen. Schcrmmevman, had sent all available men, includ- ing stretcher-beams and bakers ol the Nazi Eighth Army, into the firing lines in a last agonizing strug- gle repeating the same fatelul pattern which a year ago preceded the Stalingrad surrender.. ft The midnight communique, re- w corded by the Soviet monitor from a broadcast, said the Germans had lost 10 more junkers trl-euglned transport planes and. four fighters in trying to supply Ihe doomed men _. They wesc downed by Soviet alr- men against parachuting of supplies. Much of these supplies intended (or the Germans weic le ported falling behind Soviet lines. Snme 150 miles to the soulli- tast the Russians said one So- viet torr.ialion ot Gen. Rodlon Aarmy had killed Germans yesterday and captur trt considerable. number in a slcany push' west of Aposlolnvo io outflank Hie iron city ot Krivoi Hog. The Russians in (his area ncrc reported more than 45- miles west of fallen Nikopol on Hie Loner llnicpcr river, where thousands oilier Germans hail teen decisively ilc- 4 fcatccl in operations still not completed. Hundreds of Runs, supply-laden trucks and wagons, and other Axis military equipment, were declared swept hy the Russians under Mniinovsky and those Gcn- i erals Nikolai F. Vatutin and Ivan S Koiiev which are conducting the liquidation of the Korsun trap. Korsun, en the 25 miles south ol the Middle Dnieper river, A was being hit hy seven Russian col- unms One Soviet column yesterday gained six miles from Gorodishchc, taken Wednesday, to seize Zavado- vka a railway village seven miles southeast ot Korsun. and other hamlets in the area. Another smash- Ing from the northwest took Nekhvoroscb, the same distance from Korsun, and other villages ir that area. It was in Ihc Zavadovka sector whcc the Russian communique said -our troops cut off several Grrmar Eioups from the main enemy group- ing nnd arc wiping them out.' Having surpassed the over-all quota of r.L ihc Paramount Majestic bone! rally and pre- mier Wednesday night, Taylor couutians now face the task of meet- ing the Scries E goal which Is still away. Total sales in the county last night had reached more than over the county's quoia and plcdses from the theater rallies were still coming in. Drive Chairman C. C. well his appreciation for Hie county's quick push over tlie top on the ovcr-allflgurc, bill il was the Series K securi- ties that drew his attention yesterday. Sale of K bonds aggregated against a quota ot 303.000. Wally Akin, manager of Inter- state theaters In Abilene, announc- ed yesterday that the pledges lor bonds at the -Paramount and Ma- jestic rallies amounted to and that the bonds issued for ad- mission receipts totaled Nolan county also was over tin top yesterday, according lo figure, released by G. A. Swaini of Sweet ALLIED HEADQUARTERS IN THE SOUTHWEST PACIFIC, Fri- day, Feb. 11 Victorious con- clusion 'of a rugged New Guinea jungle campaign ivhicli trapped 300 Japanese and wiped out the "great bulk" of them was announc- ed today by Gen. Douglas MacAi- tlmr. Australian veterans of African Wreck Injures Nine vnler, campaign chnhman. Approximate over-all sate on a quota. Series E sales were against 52B6.0CO quota. Swaim predicted the deficit would be met easily. Lacking of their WO.OOO Fourth War Loan quota, Tesans have been asked to listen tonight lo the saga of the late LI. :ol. William Edwin Dycss of Al- bany At least 44 Texas radio sta- tions will carry the story of the March of Death the men of Hataan mute pris- oners of Then Dycss' father, Judge Richard Dycss, will have a mes- sage for listeners. Dallas county sales yesterday had passed within sight of the goal. At Wichita Falls bond sales sky- rocketed 300 per cent, campaign managers said, after Sgt. Eddie Mulcahy of Sheppard Field Monda> citizens about a diversionary raid over Japan while Maj. Gen James Doolitile and his low-flying squadrons Incited bombs nn Tckyo Tears filled UK eyes ol the 11-17 gunner as he [old how four com- rades failed to return. He had shut down two Zcio.s Mulcahy offered his short snorter hill for sale, which brought an offer lo buy st.500 in war bonds. An appreciation cam- paign was touched off as three IVIchita Falls men pmchased a to tal of in bonds. At Killccn. Mrs. j. M. Gray, whose son. Capt. Robert M. Gray, iiiloted one of the bombers on the Tokyo raid and subsequently WAS killed on a flight in India, smashed a bottle of champ.ipue on the nose of the same kiiul of bomber her son flew and christened the craft "Miss Killcen." The ceremony climaxed the war bond rally at Killecu. which had far exceeded its quota. The first Flying Fortress ever to Victory Wanted lo Boost Home Morale ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, Algiers. FCD. Superior Gorman forces .slashed with rising power at the entire 30-mile of the Allied beachhead near Rome i the past 24 hours, probing for a weak point against which icy might throw men and armor iu an all-out assault on merican and British troops who "have been fighting almost 'iilinuously for Ifi davs. The violence cf Nazi artillery fire i as increasing, and dtsp.Hche.s Mid vanced Allied fcutes were being pplied only at great risk. Kven land at (he Tctnplc Army Air Field picked up two wounded soldiers from McCloskey General Hospital for a war bond rally in Ardmore. Okla.. last night. The men were Sgl. Willis Martin; Ardniore, who lost his right arm at Salerno, niul Prl. George Nelson. Cristicld, Md., who lost both legs on Aim. PENNSAUKEN. N. i.. Feb. 10 HV-A Puinsylvania-Readins Sea shore lines freight engine" era into the locomotive of a Pcnnsyl- vania railroad passenger train at a junction in Pciinsniikcn township late loday. nnd at least nine p'-r- batilcs with the Nazis climaxed a five montlis drive over the Huon peninsula's treacherous terrain rjy effecting a juncture Thursday morn- Ing with American invasion forces near Saidor putting both In posi- tion to thrust toward bomb-paralyz- ed Madaug. Fliers report indications (hat the Japanese may have already abandoned that coastal base. The Aussies and Yonks joined forces at old Yagomi, 11 miles scnth- cast of Saidor. The Australian In famry force and citizens military force (militia) met the. Americans- including Buna veterans of'the 32nd division, on a hot, flat coastal plane The Aussits had pushed ISO mites norlhwesl from Finsch- hafen since that peninsula base was captured last Oct. 2. They fouglit bltlcrly over" towering; mountains of the Finisterrc ranjre and along the unheallhy coastal plain. They hud lo ford approximately 60 streams runn- ing down from Saruwageil and Finisterrc. The Americans landed from the :ea at Saidor Jan. 2 thereby simecz- ng Japanese between them and the then about 50 miles iway. Many of these Japanese were drowned when FT boats sank the barges on which they tried lo escape Others fled into the mountains and starved to death along the jun- gle trails. In the Huon campaign, the Japa- nese forrr.s destroyed included six infantry, artillery and engineer rc- jimcnts. "Our ground troops advancins along (he coast have established contact with our forces at Saidor. thus ending the relentless pursuit of 150 miles lasting many weeks over most difficult terrain." Ihe com. muniquc said of the New Guinea land victory. "A Japanese reinforced diu- sinn, trapped with Us supply anil communication lines cut and wilh its way tn Ihc sontli blocked or almost impassable mountain ranges and our forces In the Ramu valley, was r.ra- flually dcslrujcd ill ils desperate rffrrts tn break nul lo Ihe wesl. Jefensive positions ore crumblim m Hie southern flank of the ocean orridoi- leading from the Bismarck ea to the Philippines. Kabaul, key to the enemy's jrrip on the entire area, was re- ferred to as a term llic censor lefl unchanged in clearing a dispatch from Gua- dalcanal by Fred Hampson, As- sociated Press war correspond- ent. Madang. principal Japanese port, on the northeastern New Guinea coast, appeared to Allied war-plane pilots to have been deserted. American pilots who swept low over Madang Wednesday reported seeing evidence that the Japanese may have demolished buildings leti intact after weeks ol Allied raiding and retreated to the north. AMERICA'S ONE-FLIGHT ACES WORLD WAR I tradition n Sub-Freezing Weather Hits A gusty norther-brought Abilene first in three weeks last night. Meteorologists at the airport said he temperature likely will drop lo a Iciv of 20 to 25 degrees Ihis morn- ng .and predicted colder weather this 'afternoon and tom'shl. The cold weather -was spreading over the entire state last night and was expected lo nip vegetation. Warnings were issued to livestock interests. The temperature tumbled from an afternoon high of 55 to freezing late last night In Abilene, At ll p.m. the thermometer read 28 at the airport. It was the firsi freezing weather for the city since Jan. 21. The Panhandle area, in the mmntimc, braced itself for temper mures from 10 lo 5 below zero. The Dallas-Fort Worlh area was promised a drop lo the mid-twen- ties. In Dallas, where the maxi- mum yesterday was 63. Ihe had fallen lo 39 degrees by 9 p.m. At Houston, the weather bureau expected temperatures a r o u n c and probably lower, am frieze .was expected to extent to the Rio Grande. At Beaumont warnings tolivcstoc] raisers were repeated, with the pcs of still lower temperatures makes ace; of fliers who down enemy planet. World War II has produced stveral who got that many or more in one flight. Marine Zeros" of two wteia later got {our more sons were injured. Pennsylvania railroad officials sain the 52 car freight went, throuah a stop fisnal" as it nearcd Hatch Junction nftcr cross- ing Ihc Dciawar? river bridge from A Pennsylvania. In the closing stapes of the cam- paign bodies of Japanese soldiers were found unharmed by bullets or shells. They starved to dealh. were found abandon- ed, indicating the sea-air blockade had exhausted medical supplies.) The enemy's aggregate strength amounted to approximately HOW men, the great bulk of which lias been destroyed. The development was the latest of n series Indicating that Japan's ARNOLD MESSAGE ON ACC1DENI PREVENTION READ AT AIR BASE A front If. H. Artioici. of the United Statct- Army Air Forcfs. calling for nn- ccasinB effort.? to prevent flying ac- cidents was read yesterday morning lo officers and men stationed at the Abilene Army Air base. The mrffUKe rloiciiatcd yesterday. Feb. 10. as Prevcnlion Dny In the. AAF tlmv.rficut tlic world to mark tlic lannchinc of an intrr.5ificd cfforl in that direction. The tr.cwapc of Gcurral AnioM nnrt that of Brie. Gen. U G. commander of tlic scconii Air Force, called xipon every man at every .Mr Forces station lo abide by llyin? regulations p.r.rj to do his job as a vart of nis team with aH Ihc efficiency of K'hicli he is capatjle. The messages were reart to the men of the 103th Fighter-Bomber group and the 474th Ba.ec Head- quarters and Air Base squaiiron at a review held on the base tniinrts. Tlie occasion also was for the puriioyc of havinp Col. Harry base comnixnflrr, prrsent to Kccnan C. Bar- ber. TMtlsficld. 111., of the sroiiri. ihc Air Medal wilh fo'ir dak t.eaf cluMrrs In RO nUli the nistinguMuil Cross already The rteroralinns were earned C'ipUIn nsrbec in Ihc Xortii African eampatftn, in wliich lie enK.itcd in mnre than Hi) sor- at the enemy. Saturday. Death March Witness To Visir in Abilene DALLAS. Feb. T Greene, traveling correspondent fo the Providence iR. Journal air former internee in Manila, said her today Hut civilian prisoners of tn arc under-fed but Ilia otherwise they aie not mislrcatcc Greene saw the march of deal through Manila streets and dcscrib cd it as "a horrible tiling." but sal it was in no way Indicative of treat mcnt accorded civilians captured ti Manila. Giccnc- will from here to Abi ICI'.P and Sweetwatcr in his nation wide lour, covering the war effor of the nation for his newspaper. Government Stores WASHINGTON. Feb. lift Government construction of shop stores and restaurants in war-con gesUYl areas is contemplated, ft disrlorctl today when Prcslncn Roosevelt asked Congress lor 000.000 artrtitirmal lor the Federal Works Administration. Now' 'mitslritj, down six Jap Hi won Congressional 'Medal. Over northern Italy this Army pilot shot sin planes down in 15 minutes.- oush the Allied air force struck ith overwhelming power at tl'.e lemy's Immediate communications, ilh fighici-s operating from an im- landing strip on Die beacti- ead liwlf. the Germans still ap- caicrt to be massing reinforce- .ents of men and tanks. "In onlrr to Iry lo jlvc Ihc and uar weary German people tliclr (irsl victory since Marshal Itommel's last dcsfrl drive, Hitler Is throwing Ihe book at (br beachhead." nrulf Kcmlelli Illvon of Ihc As- sociated Tress. There was no promise of icllr-f or the landing forces from Ll. Gen. inrk W. Clark's main Fifth Army, for n week had been blvmicd illiln the luins o! Cassino, 50 air- nc miles' away. Today's advices aid bitter lishllns till ivas In progress there, with lie Germans literally resisting to he ttcalh. Monte Casslno. whlcli ears just northwest of the tow nil Is the key to Ils defenses, re- nalned In (he enemy's possession at atcst report. The Germans smashed at Hie beachhead at points yester- day, wilh Iheir fierccsl allnck >lmcil il Brilisli positions norlh anrl Mesl of Carrocclo (Aprllla) 10 miles due nurlli n! Anib. Three llirusls' were made against American positions wesl ol Cislcrna, Nail atrnnf-point tht Applan Way 1.1 miles northeast of Aiuio. For first'lime, Ihe enemy also jjrnb- fd Allied defenses near the cv- Ireme mils of the beachhead, i both above anil below Anzlo. All atlacks were rougru oif with- out wiious loss of ground, but an Allied sjjortesman acknowledged that the beaclihead as a whole was on the dcfoiulrc for the present. "The situation tonight is probably little le.ss grim." wrote Homer New York Herald Tribune oiiespomlent the Inctl Ameikan iiress, after Wed- hard fightins "for. al- liougli the enemy continued, his .iijitl buildup-of strength and was wave after wave of in- aniry in an effort to seize vital ilgli sioiind. casualties pre- ciiled him from (nlly exploiting a, iltnation- that had become tense 'or our forces." Jle Mid thai Brllisli artillery- men hi one threatened sector had been without rest tor 35 hours, ami lh.il Ihc Germans were allarking wilh such su- lieriiir ntimbers that "even the annihilation of a German bat- talion meant only momentary relief." Censorship permitted the disclos- ure that for several crucial last Thursday thousands, of British troops were trapped In a salient near Campoleonc, 16 miles from the outskirts of Rome. As the fiiihtlne Inside Cassino went, into its seventh fiery American ar.d German tanks en- gaged In short. deadly duct a'. street intersections and doughboys used and gran- ndcs In close combat with Nazis con- cealed in dugouts and ruined build- ings. The Germans clung to ap- proximately Ihrce-loiirtJu of the town. t DEFENSIVE POSITION BETTER By RKV.VOI.nS PACKARD Representing thr Combined American Press (IHslrllmtcil hy llic Associated I'ressl THE ANZIO BEACHHEAD FRONT, Feb. 10-Thc German drive which started ngainsl one fcclor of this beachhead last Monday night appeared today to have been slowed I that' our defensive Ls'ini- ''Some Germans who spoke per- fect English gave out orders in what ivss supiiosed to be our code, lelhiiE us to cease lire." he fald. "Needless to' say Ihey didn'l suc- ceed." As the result of a tour of the front made partly by jeep and part- ly by foot. I am convinced today Army act fockled 30 Noiii alone, gat six, bomber crcwt joid. He'i former Flying Ti- ger with six Jap victims. Army flier -downed Jap planes, aver Wewak, New Guinea, and was given lha Congressional Medal. listed as missing, Marine ace World War t record by downing 26 five in one battle. doivn as American resistance tight- ened and held. Inroads which the Germans made into this Finall beachhead have been hammered by tlic hcavlrst artillery blasts ever turned against the Ger- mans slr.cc the have seen during the past 24 RAIDERS OVER GERMANY SMASH DEFENDERS; BRING DOWN 84 PLANES, BLAST OBJECTIVES LONDON. Feb. tfi U. S. lying Fortresses, Liberators and ong-rangc fighters smashed 84 Ger- man aircraft from the skies today during coordinated raids on the Nazi manufacturing city of Bruns- wick and tlie Gilze-Rijcn airbasc in Holland, from which 29 of Ihc heavy and eight of the fighters failed to return. Mustangs, Thundcrlxil t R and IHE WFAIHFR f. 5. or r. in AHIT.I.N'h AMI V1C1MTV: Parll inrt Minimum nurh reildri in Mil oldrr In nfl roldrr I rirlx rrrir In r n rrntral fn rln Mf.ST roiacr 'n Inr lion. rlnudr I fflh In ,rl1: t" nichl. rth. hrla (.Id Sll prnlfc- Lightnings of tlic fighter escort vcra crcditod by a U. S. Army com- with dc.sUoying rtb ol the crman interceptors wiiicli ro.sc lo challenge ihc n r.ev record 'or a single and bomber gun- ners accounted for at least 29 more. ricorlcd hy fkhlcrs of all Hirer types slnirk llic new blow a( an impnr- Unl German aircraft par Thr value Ihf put upon its rie- fensr was rellcclcd in Ihr rnm- announcement that the Mchtrr heavy. TriundcrboU.i the l.lbnv alors for the GiUc-Rijcsi raid, de- signed to lay mil the rvtrnsivc run- ways, and rep.iir nf that Major German base aurt kerp Used Cor Ceiling WASHINGTON-. Feb. 10- iji The Office of Price Administration After the medal and completed a plan for price ceil- clustcrs lo Captain Barber Colonel !mM rars riKMc witliin the next two or Ihrce weeks Sec ARNOLD, Pf. 18, Col. 5 Ulicther to put it iu'.o effect. It in lurnril lr.ivinr Die Iroses In fichl nhmr. "Whrn n fort slnrltfl slnis- jtlinjr it w.is a de.nl iluck." one ro-pilnl. i'tcnly of German were seen crashing in flnmcs, Ino. BmnvA-ick is one of the Irio nf key a ire r a [i production centers suulliHTM nnd wc-ot of Berlin in Central Germany. city of 2UO.- OflO pnpiilatJnn lm been hard hit proved considerably, resulting in Ihe slowins? doun cT the German's fir.st main attempt lo drive the beachhead defenders into the There Ls doubt in my mind the. Gennnns were attcninting to smash ItsroiiKli one sector in an attempt hours "time crashes" In which him-1 to split the beachhead nnd then ri.-etis of shells landed on R f ingle-1 run in lanks as fast as passible. But despite wave lifter wave ot German troops nnd tanks thrown Into this uiuh it did not break through, but mane only a number of indentations which duriii; the last 24 hours the Allies have smash- ed. I feel row that the enemy will enemy target ullliln a period of two minutes. These artillery folnsts were re- pealed at frequent Intervals jo lhat ulicrc, the enemy liarl entrenched himself in new poMlions he suffer- ed heavy casualties. Ycsterdav the Germans Ij.-oke into the British-American radio Ire- have to inoyiU a new drive as the ijiicncies and tried !n urt the Al-, one Monday night lied aitlllrry (o cease firing. 'has petered POPE'S RESIDENCE HII AGAIN ed that as the area enjoyed extra- territorial rights 'freedom from local or state the Holy LONDON'. Feb. lo The Vatican radio saltl tonight that Cas- te) Gantin.'o. file of the Pope's sum- mer residrnce near Hie Allies1 Anzo brideehead in Italy, had been bomb- Scc tlili !'ot fail lo express concern cd lor the third time.'causing "many over Mich an attack." casualties." The Vatican radio Mid over lo.- IndlcaliiiB that Ihc pupal villa It- OOil refusers arc al tlie papal villa >elt escaped damage1, tlie broadcast, j and the buildings belong- recordcd lirre by the inp tn Ihr Holy See. Pre.v. saltl "ihree bombs fell nn the Cnstri Ganrioifo is 15 :mlcs from in a scries of fn-.jr heavy raids be-, Binnnitt with the American attack as uhrn the w.icc'tm on Jan. II Iximbrr and col'c went to the villa." Dis-1 Vatican City and :5 miles inland fiwitr.crUr.ri several j from snlrt Pope Pins XII had! Thr Ro a for fiRhtcr laclory Gandolfo. at 1 Vatican ilui tdrntilv 'W.HT5 of enemy momma ntiacfcrrt CAstrl Retne radio thU i rairirrs. bin IThrrr no c papal pro- source n[ uf.i tccn li-.volud. i from any tli.U AlUed o[ ciaft for  10- >.V. tlwic is !o foir.e and Ita'iiaii campaign has been that Ls not to be Pal- bitter and bloodv but. said. Acting Secretary ol War Robert; broil-Ill tanks. nnd P. Patterson. Ihe troops are ;r :'1Allies Need Better Weather oil.1 to force ahead at Casnnuj ranic and (tic Aiirio bcaclihratl near lulls e Roir.c is firnilv f.-tab'.Lsl'.ccl." i bor." This coulirlent in tile j Bad j tile Fittii Army was piicniwith tlic at a prc--.s rontcrciirc in which P.U- penonty anci tanks, .ir.rl -their" 1 y from inland a? f.ir ss Anzio har- i rl) 10 .1'. -Petroleum I (n will at trison '.ir not tiilnlniiz- of week L-.-mjas In- inir.'ferlng Al'.irrt airsu- Kith shlp- P1I17. ri..c Frb. H for of wartime I'nahle (n RO Ihr full l.iO-milf riislrince to Brunswick some rvf the Thundrrboll fishlini cirort American ricrhred. al the f Aiuio I'llltr.-l lll.lt the ]-r In full use ot problems xlrlderl only "a .-m.ill amount ofiAKud air nncln. could quickly The intclinc was called by How-; Around.-1 l-.aie (Kcctlvcly warded i chance t'r.c sif.i.iiion. aid Il.ijuen o! Dallas, state chair- otr allarks. bcatrn back a number I Tr.c Italian caimviiju man of (lie aikisory committee of j of tanks and taken a num-'has ens' 3.707 Aiwriran lives to j Ihr Tr.insiicrtrrs bcr of vri.-oiifis. j dale. 16.510 wonnr.cd and 1 Ollict of Dclciuc Transportation. The lull ncishl ol the Gciman he repoited.   

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