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Abilene Reporter News: Thursday, January 27, 1944 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter News (Newspaper) - January 27, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                 WAR BOND SCORE 4th War Loan quota $3,245,000.00 #ilès Tuesday    78,342.25  Sales this month    642,043.50  Shortage    2,602,956.50  Wt)t Abilene    MORNING  WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES”-Byron    -  »VOL. LXIII, NO. 224  A TEXAS NEWSPAPER  ABILENE, TEXAS, THURSDAY MORNING, JANU.A.RY 27, 1944 -TVv^ELVE PAGES  Associated Press (AP) United Press (in’.)  PRICE FIVE CENTS  II Jap Ships Sunk, 5 Damaged  Nazis Hole Defense of  Strong  Cassino  Aerial Pounding Continues Over Northern France  Bv EDWARD KENNEDY  ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, Algiers, Jan. 26 (AP) — Slashing back across the Rapido river in the Cassino area, #mcrican troops have established a firm new bridgehead on the west bank of that swift, little stream and are plunging ahead over thickly-sowed minefields and under heavy German artillery, mortar and machine-gun fire, it was announced officially today.  tThe second Yank crossing of e Rapido came as Nazi commanders—fully aware at last of the threat of Allied landings made south of Rome five days ago—pulled away part of Wie great strength they had assembled opposite the main Fifth Army front and sent crack units rushing northward to oppose the new 9>rust.  Cassino itself appeared to have been largely abandoned by the Germans. but they held dominating positions on heights overlooking ihc stronghold from which they could  tke its streets with deadly fire An nerican patrol that entered the town was forced to retire. Despite the withdrawal of special battle units, the Nazis continued to defend Cassino fiercely.  The famous benedictine monas-♦ry high above Cassino—where the order was founded some 1,300 years ago—remained intact.  It seemed certain that advance Allied units had cut the ^Appian way, some 15 miles from • the coast, and it was more than likely that the Via Gasilina between Rome and r'assino was under Allied artillery tire.  (The Cairo "r^dlo reported that  Allied troops were within 19 miles f Rome, but did not say in what direction. Ttic to*<i of Velletrl, which the German radio indicated Tuesday had been occupied by American troops, is approximately 20 airline miles from Rome ^ppian way. Ther  SWEETWATER WAR PLANT WALKOUT ENDS QUICKLY  the  AUicd  Tonfirmation of Velletds capturt.»  Although Nazi resistance to the landing force.s was reported increasing steadily, it wa major battle had  vident that vet been joined. ¿*t. GenrMark W. Clark. Fifth Army ^mmander. again visited the beachhead front and expressed satisfaction with progress made.  The natural objective of the net».-Allied operation would be the occupation of strategic positions in mountains which began to rise 7ome 15 miles inland and the establishment of a firm line across the coastal shelf below Rome, with the hills on one side and the sea oi the other.  % The Allied Air F'orce flew 1.000 .sorties over the beachhead alone, yesterday, compared with 60 by the Nazis. Eleven enemy planes were shot down against a loss of three Allied craft.  S An official announcement sal that Nazi bombers attacked three brillia.illy-lighted and p I a i nly-marked hospital ships well outside the invasion zone and sank ot them. Reiman Morin. Assoc ^ress correspondent, described “ "cold-blooded attack" at least 10 miles from the invasion zone though the doomed hospital ship sank within .^ix minutes. Morin said loss of life was believed to have been comparatively light because of swift iicscue work.  British troops along the Gari« liano river at the coastal end of tho main Fifth Army front w’ere reported to have thrown back every enemy counter-attack launched against ,^em In recent days and to have pushed ahead two miles southwest of Castelforte and captured Mt, Ceracoli. Northeast of Cassino FVench troops were forced from Ml. Croce by a .«ieries of bitter German counterattacks.  m- ---  LONDON. Jan. 26 —ifP)~ The aerial pounding of Hitler's fortifications guarding the shortest invasion route to Western Europe rolled through its fourth straight day today w’ith medium, light. and fighter-bombers striking at secret military installations in Northern France.  The dayhght operations, beginning soon after dawn, followed attacks by RAP night raiders on undisclosed objectives in Northern France, and double-ban-elled assault j’esterday on tho so-called ■‘rocket gun coast.” The night attacks also included Mosquito forays into Western Germany, all without loss.  Fighters escortcd the daylight bombers, and all planes returned.  American Army headquarters meanwhile disclosed that U. S. parachute and glider troops had been undergoing rigorous battle training in the United Kingdom and now were engaging in ilnal tests oi their iAIiTlS to operate behind enemy lines.  Artillery, engineering, anti-aircraft. signal, transport, and infantry equipment has been moved in gUdcri, which have been landing In increasing numbers recently in a large training area reserved for American airborne troops in this theater.  The Germans* expanding use of rocket projectilcf was demonstrated as British coastal command Beau-fighters attacked enemy shipping off the Norwegian coast today.  -The ships fired a rocket-like projectile which opened out in the air and had a canister attaciied by cable to a parachute.” said one airman.  The air ministry said the attack left one medium-sized merchant vessel and one escort ship afire, and a second escort ship was rocked by an explosion. One Beaufighter failed to return.  Two-hundred and forty striking workers who had virtually halted production at the United States Gypsum company's plant at Sweetwater since Tuesday were scheduled to go back to work this morning at seven o'clock although no labor-management agreement had been reached.  T. H. Cassner. manager of the plant, told the Roporter-News late last night the men had voted to resume their duties following a meeting of the local UCLG.  The walkout Tuesday waii termed A'ildcaf’ strike and failed to gain sanctions of governing bodies. The UCLG is an AFL afflliale.  Although not specifically stated, the walkout was thought, by informed sources, to be an outgrowth of a labor-manage-ment dispute over seniority rights which is to be heard by a War Labor Board on Feb. 3.  Cassner, however, told newsmen Tuesday’s walkout liad nothing to do with the former controversy and would be settled by a local labor-management mediation board.  The plant closed late Monday night when the swing shift was due to report. Sweetwater sources hinted at a wage dispute as the primary issue.  Dr. Don H. Morris, Abilene / Christian coliegc president, has been named chairman of the WLB mediations body which will hear the seniority controversy Feb. 3. Morris was recently appointed to the panel by the Eighth Regional War L^bor Board office at Dallas, lie has served in one previous labor-managcment arbitration In El Paso.  Harry B. Friedman of Fort Worth will, represent the Gypsum company and Alfred L. Bailey of Fort Worth will sit in for the union’s Interest.  The United States Gypsum company plant at Sweetwater is engaged in essential war production with almost 100 percent of its output going directly into the war effort.  Officials of the Gypsum plant last night were hesitant to discuss reasons for the walkout and efforts to reach the labor leaders by tele-  phone,  neclion  DOV MORRIS  ere unsuccessful. A con-\ response to a request to  talk to the head of the union brought only a repeated statement; “You have the w’rong number. You have the wrong number,” and a quickly hung-up receiver.  Last night's meetlnif was lengthy but those attendinR declined to discuss what was discussed or arguments which may have been Involved.  Rabaul Harbor Lined With Battered Hull(s  By LEONARD IMILLIMAN Associated Press War Editor  Eleven Japanese ships were sunk and five others damaged by Allied bnmbcr.s in the Southwest Pacific and off the Asiatic coast Monday, Allied communiques reported today.  The biggest toll was taken at Rabaul. whose harbor is lined with tiie hulls of bomb-shattered ships. American dive cnusc various witnesses wore unabio bombcrs sweeping over at masthead height sank five cargo to be in Sweetwater before that j yiijps ^nd a tanker, and damaged two others so badly their  ews beached them.  The WLB was not advisrri n{ the walkout and officials were b:ifiled that one had occurred. They attempted to hasten the Feb. 3 conference but found it impo.ssibl  time.  A Reporter-News correspondent at Sweetwater last night said the plant hod continued operations with a skeleton crew but auempts to contact any department In the building found only vacant rooms.  Floyd Burk, general represenlative of the AFL refused to make full statement yesterday following the strike. He insisted there was o walkout but that the trouble was over a question of seniority rights.  Soviets Take Another Rail Hub  Offensive Rolls Into 14th Day Battering Lines  LONDON. Thursday. Jan. 27 (AP)—Russian ti-oops have captured the massively-fortified, raij way hub of Krasnog-vardeisk, 30 miles bcrlow Leningrad, and have advanced five miles farther south, Moscow announced today in an unabated offensive whicli in the fir.st 12 days brought death to more than 40,000 Germans and routed 10 Nazi infantry divisions on tho Leningrad front alone.  The offen.'^nc. now teciUh day. wa.s rollii through tlie railwn.v lifelines which comprise tho cni:r communicalion.s  4 WOUNDED VETERANS TO AID BOND DRIVE HERE  Four veterans, bearing the scars of battle*, will be released from Mc-Closky General hospital. Temple to participate in Taylor county’s Fourth War Loan drive, C. M. Caldwell, county cihalrman, said last night.  Caldwell said he was not Irtform-  Cotton Council Asks High Price  MEMPHIS. Tenn.. Jan 26 (/T— iU four- ' The National Cotton Council today roliini; unchecked ' called on the Office of Price Administration to review immediately 1 out in tlicir first bone  ed who would be sent to Taylor county but that he was assured by Capt. Moss, public relations officer at the hospital, that four men would arrive at View Tuesday. February 1. ^ *  ^le men will participate in meetings and rallies throughout the county during tho four days they are here, the chairman said.  Other yesterday’s highlights of the bond drive here was the purchase by Co! Harry Wnfl'linszton, commander of the Abilene Air Ba.se of a SIO.OOO bond and the Lamar school student.s rally.  Colonel Waddington took tlie lead in bujinK bonds Wednesday \vheii he purchased the SIO.OOO certificate from w P Wright of the Citizens Nation.ll bank.  Lamar .'school student.-^ went all ale of the  Jaycees Launch Birthday Bal  Tlie Junior Chamber of Commerce will start the President’s birthday ball rolling today when some 23 members, divided into teams, will canvass the downtown business district in an effort to sell 2.500 tickets to the two dances to be ptaged here Feb. ' 6 for jl^e totantÿe paralysis fund. '  Jaj'cees met Wednesday night in Hotel Wooten to be divided Into 12 teams. Bill Lefland is chairman of ihe ticket sales. Wally Akin, city chairman, and Wilmer Sims county chairman of birt)ula.\' parly arrangements,  Tlie ball will be held .jointly at the Hotel Wooten for officers and civilians, and at the Hilton hotel for enlLsted men and clvilian.s.  Promoters and spon.sors of the activities are thr Abilrno Jaycees wlio will also act as hosts for the parties.  MacArthur Given His Third DSM  Twenty-four Japanese in-lercoptors were shot down by the bombers and their fighter escort, bringing to 350 the number of defending planes destroyed or probably destroyed at the New Britain base this month.  I -Our 10S.SCS were extraordinarily light ■' Gen. Douglas MacArthur reported.  Five sinall merchant ships were ■Slink and n sixth damaged oft the Central China coast by filers of tha Chlne.'ic-Amerlcan air wing of tho I4th Air Force. Another was left in flames in the Admiralty Islands, northwest ot Rabaul, and a steamer was hit off Southern Burma.  For jfood measure PT boats sank three troop-laden barges . off Northeast New Guinea and 60 river craft were raked by air patrols over Burma.  All American planes returned safely from the raids over Asia and “acl“ In the Marshall  Loan  Wednesday whrn o\rrv piipil and teacher in the building purcha.sed a stamp or bond.  Tho .Tpproxhnate 200 piutils in-estrd SoOT.30 with the Mxth grade.  iincr. lead-  THE WEATHER  PARTMENT  COMMERCE  ABILENE 'and'  north: Friday  cbntlnupd rolr  rEMTERATUF  =  12 — r.T........10.  niffll and niVh and'  Sonset tonifht: 7:08.  Summer Weather Apparently Ends  A l6-dcgree drop in tcmperatmc in an liour's time Wednesday niglu indicated at least a temporary end to Abilene’s Junc-in-January weather but the thermometer wa.sn't due (o reach to a freezing level until Friday nipht.  Forecasters said that despite the dip from 70 degrees at 7 p. m. to 54 at 8 p. m.. freezing wasn’t in store for Wednesday night. Near 32-de-yrce temperatures are scheduled to come tomorrow night.  A sudden flurry of rainfall that began at 7:30 o'clock la.st night had resulted ’n .31 inch of moisture bv 10 o’clock, when the precipitation had slowed to drizzle.  From Stamford came reports of a hard shower accompanied by wind ,    .  and eloctrical di.splay. !=tartinB at !  7 o'clock. Indication was there would  ■oute.s of Noithern Russia. Latest    '='^"“'■8 Pnces and j Fourth W  advances announced* by the Rus- [ “niake such adjustments as are " sians showed gau^s along the rail- nece.ssary to enable mills to pav ful way to Vnelx.k and new blows p^cc.s to farmers for cotton • oo.sennig tlie la.st German hold on I    re.solution. adopted bv th<  the Moscou.Leningrad trunk    convention.’ also: taucht bv Mr. r o.  « .-,0 mile .Mretch between Tosno    if    of,    p:„.cha:sep with M33 2...  Ihe pendins dcniand.s of labor uii- j-rank Eller, principal of the ions for icxtile wagr Increases be school, .^aid 20 bonri.s and around granted that Ihe textile ceilings be' 1200 slainp.s were sold None of Ihe rcvi.sed upward simultaneously." ¡bond we.e bought h> ihr pavenl.^ The group also voted to move it.s ¡^p a.i^serled. but were bnmfide pur-re.search divLslon in Memphis 10 cha.ses the studenu.  Texas, where it will work in con- _^___  junction with Southern Methodist university and the State Univer.-'UV in a program co.'ting. accordinii Council President Oscar John.ston.  ••at least S2.-i0.000.'  Tlie covmcil re-elected Johnaion. vice-presi(irnls Robert R Coker of Hartsville. S. C . Lamar Flf'min'^ Jr . of Hou.ston Texas, and Harold A.  Young of Little Rock Treasurer William T Wynn of Cireenvillr Executive Vicc-Pr  and Volkhovo.  The fine (o \ itcbsk—one of the two German escape routes to the south—«as under fire from the Novgorod area, about 70 miles >.oulh of the Leningrad Russians moving down from the north.  Capture of Krasnogvardcisk, controlling Ihp rail lines to Estonia and Latvia, was announced yesterday in a ^pccial order of tho day from Premier 31arshal Joseph Stalin, who ordered a victory salute of IZ salvoes from 124 guns.  Nine West Texans On Casualty List  I'hc Moscow midniulu radio munique ua\c additional details of i Mis the capture. Tl'c Rus.';ian.s attacked | Srcretary William Rhea Blake of by night and reached to the streets Memphi.s and General Coun.scl of the city after breaking tlirough Lovell W. Taylor of Memphis  concrete fortiticution.s. A flanking -----------  maneuver finished the ficht    r\*  •■Enemy troops who weie defend- Vanderbilt UlBS ing the city were routed,“ the com-  Tlie names of nine men In surrounding territory were announced as casualtie.s by either the Army or Na^•y Wednesday in a War Department release.  Those in some branch of the Navy include O. W Arthur, seaman second cla.s.s, missing, husband of Mrs. Mar\ Kniahn Artlnir. Brady; Guy Sanniel Beckham. a\iatlon radioman third cia.vs. nii>.‘-ing. son of .Mr, and Mrs. Samuel T. Beckham. Brady: Cpl. Je.«;.«;e B. Penn, woimd-ed, son of Mrs. Ollie M. Penn.  The idenlllv of a skrleton found Wealherford.  ^    ! Soldiers wounded In notion In  near the AlJilene Air l;,».se Monday Medeterranean area nu-hide Set. afternoon remained shrowded in ^ I3on Adam.v. son of Joe B. Adams, ident and mj’.<stcty la.st night as Ca/np Barko- | Sjiyder; Sgt. Melvjn Dorrow. hu.s-  Skeleton Found Here Unidentified  GEN. DOUGLAS MacARTHUB  ADVANCED    HEAE)-  QUARTERS.'^ew-aCiirieB. 'Jan. 2ff C<^)—Gen. Douglas Mac.\rthur received his third distin^ished service medal today — his 64th birthday anniversary — for valuable services to his country.  The medal was awarded by President Roosevelt •for exceptionally distingui,‘;hed service as .supreme commander of Allied forces m tlie Soiithwest Pacific since March. 1942. ‘ It was presented on the pres-idenls behalf by Maj. Gen. Richard J. Marshall, deputy chief of staif.  Cieneral MacArthur receded his first DSM during World War One. The second was awarded later, in peare time, follownig hLs five years a.s clnef of staff of the United States Army.  Wool Growers Bid $100,000 for Lamb  DENVER. Jan 2(i <,.1'.^The prize-winiung lamb at the recent Nation al Western Stock sliow .sold for $5.10 a pound, but a slnule !anib at National Wool Growers' conveiUion •Aas wortli SKXl.noo as slrrp growers sold and resold it 18 tinus m an unpromplu war bond c;un;)aign.  One deleuate r.ouglu $.'>.000 in bond.'' to .see another do a lit. \^líile $20 f)00 wii.v spent for bonfis to prc-  be  General Bradley Given Decoration  LONDON. Jan. 26 —i/P)— Gen Dwight D. Eisenhow’er has awarded the Legion of Merit to Lt. Gen. Omar N. Bradley, .senior commander of U S. ground troops in th.? United Kingdom, for his leadership of the American Army Second Corps during fhe Sicilian campaign.  Congressman Hit, Badly Hurt by Car  WASHINGTON. Jan. 26 —i/P)— Rep. Charles L. Gifford. 73, Ma.ss-achusetts Republican serving his 12th term in the House, was struck and critically Injured tonight by a street car while crassing the street near his Washington residence.  Police reported he had suffered a fractured skvll and other »ijurle.«. He w'as taken to emergency hospi-.^al.  munique said. ’Oniy scijarute groups of German officers and men were able to escape, tlirowing away Iheir arms, ... In the fiiihling at tne approaches to the cit\’ and in ets several thou.sand German killed.-  The advancc contuuicd west, •southwest and .south, the Russians capturing among many other populated place.s Pizhma. five mile.s beyond. Forty G<rman trucks wltli arms and ammunition were seized in one community. In another a considerable number of prisoners were taken.  The Russian announcement of German casualties, made in the broa<lcast of the Moscow daily communique, added 20.00U  Sec SOVIETS. Pg. X Col. 5  Nfce Landing  A U. S, BOMBER BASE IN ENGLAND. Jnn 26 —Pp— Technical Sgt. Johns M. Webb cf YorkviHe, O.. an aerial gunner, parachuted from a Flying Fortress onto the back of a horse.  Webb bailed out of a burning FoHress when it was near Its base and floated to a field where a horse was grazing. He landed squarely on the animal’s back.  “He reared up In the air and I tumbled off his back to the ground." Webb said. •‘I m afraid that horse w’on’t be any good for spring plowing.”  ley int:!lmencc officers bruan a rou tine check-up of mi.«>sin!j .solriiers, Lt. Col Na.sby W. Bnllin;:. cani] intelliyenre officer, sairl ii\unl)ei-s oi a nfle and canteen founo ne;»i tn bone-strewn corpse u re bein HAVA.N'A. Jan. 26 '.T — Mrs. Cath- checked with inteUigen<'e offlccr leen Vanderbilt Arostegui. member of iinit.s formerly trainimi hero, of the wealthy and socially promi- ShouUI th/' skeleton Ije fli:*t of ncnl American Vandnrbilt famih. soldiei- tl,' .serial nuniucr. died at tho Anglo-American hos-; equipment might shed liuhi pital todav after a loim illn'ss    mystery.  ' band of Mrs. jBrownwood: Syt, Henr I lock, son of Mrs Tola : ; Breckenridur: S-Sti husband of Mr.s, Maurn I Sn.\(ler; Pf<- Horner P', i of Mrs. Nettle M. Car : Plain.s-.  1 Dorr I.. Gun-Gunlock. ’ H. King, M. Kim:.  Il " Whiskey Distilling ti c Shut Off for 1944  Rites Tuesday tor Midland Resident  Mini.AND. J  for Robert Sa  —-.Kpl-—Fun-’re held here 'I'uesday lor. 87, Mulliuul resi-  Mrs. R .1. S;‘n(iefcur uf rxav six Krandflilldren ;il t:re;.t-Kriinclclnlclren  THEY FIGHT ON—The massed flags and arrow indicate the Cassino front where Allied and Nazi troops were still in bitter combat. The Allies were moving forward at two points. The arrow leading from the U. S. and British flags points to the Allied bridgehead at Netturno (blackencd area).  W.^SHINOTON. Jsn 26—./T-.-N new whi.skey tan be clisUlled ihi .vear. the War Pnxkiclion board san today, niakinii previr that effect finul ajid  Donald M. Nelson. WPB chairman. said increased demand by .synthetic rubber plants for industrial alcoliol is one important factor In tlie WPB decision again.st 1044 production of beverage spirits.  New Dies Probe  Nazis Add Insult  WITH THK FIFITI ARMY BEFORE CASSINO, Italy. Jan, 26 — .7’—The GermaiLS who pushed back the first American bridgcheatl acro.ss the Rapido river added in.»;ult fo mjury before they were Ijurlcd back again.  •'Herewith your me.ssagc pidgcon Ls returned. Wc have plenty to eat.”  The mc.ssagc was signed, "some German troops,”  W.A.'iHINGTON. .I.iti    — P -  cports to Channian Uic;> 'IJ-Tex, .s/iid to-•ial.    dny *haf the    c'ommiftee on  un-Atnencan attivitie.s i.s nivcsM-CaluiK "Peace Now’, an organization he described a.s advocating a negotiated termination of hastili-  How fitr the investigation lias pro«r^‘-‘^''Cd —    declined to dis  close He -said his eonmiittce prii>-cipally wuiiied ‘ to find ovU who Is puttms up 111'' money to finance  New WLB Rule  DALLAS, Jan. 26 (-P)—CPhoto-engravlng plants with el&ht or fewer employes now’ must make application to the War Labor Board for proposed wage and salary adjustments. Floyd McGown. chairman of the Eighth Regional War LAbor Board, reported today.  SERVICE EMBLEMS  Atfractivc one, two, and three sfor Sorvico Emblem» ere avoilabic to relatives and friends of men ond women in the Armed Forces, free of chorgo ot The Reporter-News Business Office.  These emblems are printed on book paper in colors. If the one you now hove ts faded, dtscolorcd, or torn, one will be given as o replacement.  They will be moited for only 5c.  cn new islands.  The Marshall raiders added fiva more Zeroes to their total bag, and ■ softened up shore defenses and alr-  .1’' "'lU and.Maloelan tattltjvas    -  ^Nipponese fenrs of air raids on the home Island were reflected In a Berlin radio report that 17 dls-tiicts In Tokyo and the Industrial city of Nagoya, 160 miles from I ok JO. were oidered evacuated as a precaution. Virtually the only approach to them would be from air-craft carriers.  Fifteen fleet carriers were among the 468 new fishting .ships War Production Chitf Donald Nelson reported had been added to the U S r'avy by Jan. 1.  Rear Adm. Emory S. Land, war .shipping administrator, told longre.s.s that Japan's peace-llmo merchant fleet was built for quick conversion to war purposes and ad{led:  “I don't Ihink the Japs have any right to he t.eated as civilized human beings, and I would not let them do any flying or have any transoceanic mer-chant m.irine afier the peace fs dictated in Toltyo.’'  Reports from Algiers said the Japane.se and Germans are still running blockades exciianging vital war materials, including completo steel rolling mills going to Japan.  Jajjaji Ioi>t its la.st diplomatic contact with tho American continent when Argentina broke relations with the .^^:l.s,  Monday night, six Japanese plan» c.s flrcpped 28 bomixs at Arawe and another plane dropped t. bomb Tuesday morning but headquarters said there were no resultant casualtJes. At tlic other American beachhead on Borgen bay. northwest of Arawe, the slaying of 30 Japane.se and cap« ture of 30 automatic weapons by Marlne.s \va.s contained in reports’ received by headquarters today.  Liberators Monday hit Bogadjim. Jai)anese defense outpast betw’een the AiL.s.sies and Madang: also struck at Mfldang and at the airbase of '.cxishafcn to the north.  The supply base of Ilansa bay, about Midway between Madan;; and Wewak was raided Tuesday morning by a large flight of Liberators. Fires were started among gun positions and supply dumps. In that same sector. Tfavy patrol-torpedo boats sank three barges loaded with Japanese troops. (Such barges ordinarily carry at least 40 soldiers.)  Tuesday afternoon. Thunderbolts spotted Japanese soldiers retreating in the coastal area southeast of Madang where they are trapped between American invaders of Sai-dor and Australians above Sio. The patrol planes strafed the fleeing stragglers.  Farther southeast on the Huon peninsula. AUied-held Pinschhafen was attacked Sunday night by an undetermined ntmiber of Japanese planes which caused slight damage to the harbor and minor casualties.  Counfy Buys Bonds  MIDLAND. Jan. 26 —(Spl)—Mid-land county commissioners at their meeting Monday invested $11,500 in war bonds. County Judge E. H. Barron was authorized to make the purchase of the bonds.   

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