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Abilene Reporter News: Sunday, January 2, 1944 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - January 2, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                UUMAIS, riKST IN WEST TEXAS VOL. LXIII, NO. 199 A TEXAS 2-w, NEWSPAPER OR WITH OWKNSE TO miKNDS OR FOES WK SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT SUNDAY Allies Launch'44 G Marines Ixpand tapeHold ABILENE, TEXAS, SUNDAY MORNING, JANUARYS, 1944 -THIRTY PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS AuocMtd Press (API United Prest IV.P.) PRICE FIVE CENTS 4 ADVANCED ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, New Guinea, Sunday, Jan. Marines, pushing a mik and a half beyond the air- jrirome in expanding their holt on Cape Gloucester, New Brit- ain, have counted more than Japanese dead and Gen- eral MacArthur's headquart- ers said "the total (enemy) Casualties are estimated 'at many times this figure. The estimates Included wounded removed to areas still held by the Japanese and to slain troops bur- frd the day the invasion opened a week ago today, The enlargement of the Ameri- can hold on that Northwestern New Britain base was largely a defen- sive move, Intended to provide ad- room in which to meet any Japane.se cour.terattaclcs. Offensively, Ihe Fifth Air- force struck M3-ton bombing- blow at the Japanese North- western N'etr Guinea base of .Madani; the Solomons airforce, which already has bagged more than 100 enemy pianos at Ra- bin] since Dec. 23, added M more during a 39 Ion bombing of that Northeastern New Brit- fortress; and 12 enemy raWers were ihot down during attacks OB Arawe, the South- Xew Britain sector nhich Ihe .Wits iBTiidfd 15. In, (he. western sector of -the Cape Jcioucester position, Japanese ccuri- "leraltacks were ua A single plane Thursday J tempted one of the -few. enemy air raids made since the invasion. sixty miles to the southwest" at P47s tangled. H'ith Japanes" uiire bombers and fighters in hum- werous .'ingle action, downing eight bombers and four fighters for cer- tain and probably two other: fight- ers. No Allied losses were listed. Nineteen Liberators of the Solo- j Dions airforce, escorted by fighters, j opposed by heavy anti-aircraft fire and between BO and 90 Japa- fighters as they raided Ra- baul Friday noon. Many fires were started with the pounds of exposives. 9 A spokesman for Adm. Wil- liam T. Halsey 20 enemy fighters were shot doirn for certain and six others probab- ly destroyed. His were based on reports received affcr A General MacArthnr's communl- was Issued today, listing 12 enemy losses. One raiding bomber vat lost and several were damaged but Nippo- nese planes failed again to hil the jftibe'rators with aerial phosphorous bombs. At the hour of the Rabaul raid. a Solomon force of 18 unescorted on Bougalrvllle. The 253-ton strike on successes elsewhere. spread over gun positions, suppl and bivouac areas, was aimed at the next big Japanese New Guinea base jnorthwest of Huon peninsula on which Australian Jungle troops are steadily advancing. Those troops, reported today to have reached a point some 65 miles north of Fin- trade Journal "War and the Work- schhaltn. are approximately 100 1n8 asserted today force Is within 35 miles of that ene- "temporary advantage Is a thing my shipping base. To Release Cons WASHINGTON. Jan. 1 The War Food administration plans soon to release about 440.000 case Han channels. A This stock is to come from sup plies previously set aside for w KING PETER II Peter on Secret Mission; Expect Man 'Break" LONDON, Jan. King Peter, youthful exiled monarch of Yugo- slavia who has been disavowed by the partisan, Marshal Jorfp Broz was repoited to have left Cairo for a "seem deifinaiion" to- day and reports arose immediately that some Balkan development was imminent. It'was recalled thai a spokesman for army under Gen. Mibailovic probably would not be thrown into the current battle against the invading Germans un- til nn Allied army invades the Bal- kans. The possibility was not over- looked, also, thai King Peter's (rip unVI-t foreshadow an effort to settle the tangled affairs of his kingdom. Although there was no definite hint u to the purpose of his mys- terious trip, it was recalled also that Teler conferred with Wiled leaders during last month's historic Cairo conferences. Unofficial Yu- goslav sources here said they td the monarch was returning to Yugoslavia, in an to unite the rival guerrilla armies. Presumably these sources based their belief on the Dec. 22 mani- festo of Trio's national council of liberation which "deprived" Peter's government, of all rights and "for- bade'1 the king to rctvirn until his homeland had been liberated. Both the tnited States and Britain, hoiccver, slill recognize the eiiled government although most of Ihe recent Allied aid to Yugoslavia has gone Into Tito's armies because I hey have been doing the heaviest fijhttng against Ihe Contradictory reports came front Berlin and Tito's headquarters on the bitter fighting raging along the 400-mile Yugoslav front. Berlin, claiming Ihe sixth major Nazi offensive 10 crysh the guerril- Fifthlakes Heights; 8th Near Pescara ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, Algiers, Jan. Amer- rcan Fifth Army troops, fight- ing in the jagged hills oast of San Vittorio, have seized three more heights, it was an- nounced today, and the Can- adian spearhead on the Adri- atic coast has driven another mile toward Pescara. Headquarters also announced that AR S GAINS AGAINST THE JAPANESE Outstanding swept over thc channel lo British raiders who penetrated be- Sains againsl fie Japs during 1943 were the American cap- smothering loads o f hind the German lines at the turc of Aftu, Kiskn, the Gilberts, most of Die Solomons and bombs on Nazi defenses, inoutn ol the Garigliano river AUiorl imt.li n Thp tnvacinn the German lines of the Garigli icsday night had demolished an important railway and highway bridge which would have served the enemy for a retreat to the Appian way a few hundred yards north of ihe river. The commando ladies of the British Inflicttd a number of casualties on Ihe Germans and resulted in (he capture ol pris- oners who were broughl back to Ihe Fifth Army. The communique eallcd It a "darlns raid." The headriuar- tcrs of Gtn. Sir Harold andtr, Allied commander in Italy, jive no further details. The plodding advances by the Americans and Canadians w made despite defiant German me guerrn- IKJ.UI las finally has turned to Berlin to Abilene police, victories, said lhat partisan activity in Bosnia and Montenegro a.? weil as in Albania had been "thorough- ly liquidated." Tito's daily broadcast conimuni- a jM.omon lorce 01 w unescorted urtuj cc-nimuni Mitchells dropped 12 light bombs gave no hint of defeat, claim- and many I'ragmentation clusters ing instead that his partisan bands Japan's long inoperative Kahili maintaining their offensives the south coast of !n Hercegovina, Montenegro and parls of Bosnia, and registering new Red Journol Soys Jap Advantage Past MOSCOW. Jan. 1 The Soviet of the past.'' "He who mounts a, tiger cannot easily dismount." "In any rase." the article con- auv.i TTv.vw linucd, "Japan cannot count now or about pounds, of can- on effeclive assistance from Ger- ned pork and beans for tale in clvi- ,_ Thc comlren[ was (hc mosl out_ spoken yet made here on the Pa- cific war in which the Soviet union is neutral. sistance physical and almost conditions. intolerable Miserable See ITALY, Pg. 8, Col. Z Quiet Holiday For Abilene Without, much 'noise, and fanfare bowed out of the picture in Abilene and police reported "the CjUielesl holiday.In several years." One major accident marred the year's end night when Rtla Turner and f.t. Harold Lawson were struck by an automobile on South First street near the high school build- ing. Miss Turner was hospitalized at Hendrick Memorial where attend- ants said last night lhat she was doing nicely. She is being treated for fraclures of the skull, and jaw and a chest injury. Lieutenant LawEon Is being treat- ed at thc Camp Barkcley base hos- pital for a fractured leg. According to police Miss Turner and Lieutenant Uwson were mem- bers of a party of four who had alighted from a taxi and were crossing Ihe street. The car, in which a Lieutenant Holies. Lieutenant Long, Mrs. Holies and Mrs. Long, were riding, was traveling west when It struck the pedestrians. we-e few, pol.cr ss.'d, with only two iry rested when Ihcy started lo dm, away In a captain's car. War Bond Sales Top Quota for December With war bond sales totaling 092.25 on thc final day of ths month. Taylor county surpassed its December quota with plenty to spare. that The December sales aggregated egalnst a quota of C. M. Caldwill. chalrmar. of the county war fijianrt committee, ex pressed h the past.' 1.UUJUJ iviu IJJWHI.C commmte. ex- The article, reviewing Japanese- his upprecialion last night Cnrnm-tnA ftf Martnnr German relations, said Japan must for thc Tavlor countians pilch- LUIillildMU Ul now recall the Oriental proverb- ed to lhf monthly drlvr ...T. ______._ Caldwci! said (hat hr had not been notified what Ihe fourth war drive goal in January will be. .MARTIN VAUGHN IS ABILENE'S STORK DERBY WINNER A Martin James Vaughn arrived at FSt. Ann hospilal yesterday at p.m. to capture AbHene's annual New Years stork derby. Martin, son of Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Vaughn, 918 Blair, was literally born with silver spoon In his Jmouth In the lorni of many pres- ents from Abilene rWrcharits. The Kcv Yt-ar's contest winner is THE WFATHFR r. s. nrr.irtT3iF.NT or inMMr.Rn ul.'mrrrr AMI wriMTt: ani Mln sor.flij. rlnnfj- intt rr Mnnday. r.lsT T More Bombs Fall as Air Tempo Grows LONDON, Jan. Thc Allied invasion com- mand worked with quiet geney and without a pause for' the holiday today, in line with I Gen. Dwighl D. Eisenhower's j slogan promising victory in I Europe Ihic year, as squad- rons of Allied pianes again Outstanding swept over thc channel lo o ie oomons an the Allictt Guinea ctilminuting in the American (AP Wirophoto) 1943 Bomber Losses Under Four Percent LONDON, Sunday, Jan. Thc Britain-based United Stales Eighth Airforce destroyed German [iclitcr planes during 1013 and dropped tons of bombs on Kuropc at an over all loss of less than four per cent, LI, Gen. Ira C. KaVer, commander of the group, reported today before latins up his nciv post as Allied aerial commander in the Mediterranean. Stressing the rapid increase in the operations of the unit thc Eighth Air Force revealed that a new secret ir.elhod of bombing through clouds thus over-coming bad winter weather, had enabled the Americans to drop a record load of 12.000 tons of bombs in 10 raids during December This was more than double Ihe weight dropped In November anc1 rouBh- 5' 30 per cent more than the total tonnage fo.- Hie first six months of la 43. General Eaker, In his report nhidi was broadcast fo the United States, said that In (he last two raids by the EiKhlh Air Force, ap- proximately planes were mure than half of [hem four- engmed bombers. Underscoring the growth of the force the General M .nurabtr Flyine Fortresses which rulfled WU- l hclmsnaven almost a year ajo, Jaii. Americans', he.said, were thc Jail. 21V first to fighter planes over n Lit; iJU; iu jjgjugr pjancs over many itself and he declared pilots of the Eighth Air Force meeting the. Germans their home ground had shot them down at a rate of 3 to 1 Eaker said the Germans had concentrated nearly 70 per cent of their fighters in the west-more than double the number on the Rus- sian and Mediterranean fronts but he added "men of Hie Eighth Air'Force never have been 'turned away from their targets bv enemy action.'" The tonnage dropped during December coustltulcil about a quar- ter of the Eighth Air Force's tonnage for thc entire year. f7W-u7.r's rictivities thcse accomplishments: Established the feasibility of high-altitude, daylight precision bomb mg against the enemy's to-.ighcst opposition: Blasted .a half- dozen main Nazi submarine bases, helping to win the battle of thc Atlantic; Developed a powerful and long-range fighter eecort system which helped drive home fel'.ins blows against German war In- dustry ar.d the Nazi air force-wlth 3.000 German planes shot down to Ihe loss of about t.OOO American bombers and 150 fighters; Transformer! (he Marauder medium bomber from llic "ugly duck- in Mime, quarters as unsafe, In an effective short- range. one-Ion bomber wllh a record of less llian one per cent In losses; And proved that the revolutionary, heavy P-17 Thunderbolt Ihe Well Lieutenant Hoi.cs reeled Ihe "'S'T ptane the coil, :cidcnt to Abilene police. The pace of 10 ralrts a roonth-tno and a liali (Imcs heller than (h, Abilene New Year's celebrants "umber fnr December. 1912-was attained during onlv 11 ee ore -lou ere fen-, nn ca'H n-iti, mnnfhc .b preuou, months and during favoraM, weather, jr ed. persons being arrested for "being has conquered Arrests of soldiers by police were also few, police said. One group of soldiers were ar that thc American forci far as flying Is concern -H...LH. n.i iirt iiiitiK is concern Winter bombing results undoubtedly will be short of clear wealhe effectiveness, however. the their for the mini ber of botn heavy combers and sent out on one operation dis nianyT him" cst'malct) at 6CO to 6M bombers and nearly a: All Fronts Reds Only 27 Of Border Invasion commander's co'.i- gian Premier Hubert Pierlot that his counlry would be liberated of Its Nazi invaders within "a few innnlta." A steady procession of Allied fighters and flghlur-bombers went over the "invasion coast" of Europe- today in a tactical follow-up of yesterday's American strategic bombing of two tall-benring plants at Ivry and Bols dc In the Paris suburbs r.nd two Nazi air- bases near Cognac in West-Central France. Same of the Invasion com- manders have already arrived LI. Gtn, Carl A, Spaalz, who will command American strategic bombing of Europe-----and are busy ivlth conferences and arrangements for bringing: in the other offi- cers that will complete Elsrti- hotvcr's team. Shortly after arriving, Spaali conferred with L. Gen. Ira C. Kikcr, commander of the Brit-, ain-based Eighth Air force who Is beinj transferred to thc Mediterranean theater. Contrary to what nln'ays had bKii the practice' In this "theater but-iii' line.with tjie practice always observed during com- mand of the Mediterranean, today's nir communiques dealt with opera- tions of the day before. One joint Air Ministry-U. S. Air Force communique announced that "strong forces" of U. S. Marauder bombers nnd RAF and Allied um, light and lighier-bombcra at- Ser. BOMBINGS, tf. It, J StiEKS RE-KLECTION Bascom Giles, commissioner of (lie lanrf office Saturday became (he slate official (o file formally for a "lace on the 1944 Democratic ballul, seeking a thitd (erm; Sector Gets Slow Soaker, Inch Fall Here Following one of (he driest years In recent history in which only 18.49 Inches of moisture was received, 1914 came rolling In on low flying clouds which left 1.03 Inches of moisture to establish a 58-yenrj record for New Year's day. The precipitation, hailed as a "million dollar" rain by many farmers nnd stockmen, fell slowly with almost, no runoff and was Nation Has Many Violent Deaths By The Associated 1'rcss Thc nation's new year weekend celebration tlic Vialf-way mark near midnight Saturday night marred by deaths. at least 112 violent ih odiS field Of the fatalities reported since 6 P- m., Friday, an Associrted press survey showed thnl 73 were the result of Iraffic accidents nnd 33 from other causes. Including fire, gunshot, suffocallon and drowning. Thc normal toll lor the three- clay holiday period would range be- tween 225 and 275 lives lost In traf- (Ic accidents. Use National Safc'.y Council estimated, California, with 13 traffic deaths. led the nation In Ihe number of I highway fatalities. New York led LONDON, Sunday, Jan. army italizing on Ihe greatest Ger- man military debacle since Stalingrad lunged to with- in 27 miles of the pre-war Polish border yesterday in pursuit demoralized Ger- man troops who were throw- ing away their guns, Moscow announced early today. Inflicting huge losses on Uu Gen. Nlkolnt Vatutin's first Ukrainian army captured Eelokoro- vlclil on the Kiev-Warsaw railway, and also began an enveloping drive, on Movoarad Volynskl, a rail and. highway junction less than 20 miles from Poland. Novograd Volynskl is the last German stronghold bar- ring the way to Kcd army smash Into Poland. As Ihe advance of Valutin's men threatened the possible en- trapment of 50 German divisions In the southern Ukraine, Rus- sian ruerrlllas operating behind the Nail lines were revealed to be wruklns key enemy rail lilies uilil (rains In the reston of tht Rumanian border. The Russifin war bulletin, record- ed here by the Soviet monitor, also from arra3ccl highly beneficial lo small grain crops and pasturclnud. Slock tanks, however, were not greatly benefltted by soaking moisture.' Nolan county received at. least an Inch of rain yesterday itirt good rain was reported in Fisher county. W. K. (Jrecn, local weather ob- server, said last night that yester- day's rain measured .39 of nn Inch more moisture than received on Jan. 1 over n 58-year period. In 1836 n Irace of moisture was recelvr-d and another trace was re- corded In 1895. Forty-three one- hundrcdths of nn Inch came In 1903 and In 1905 .03 fell. In 1526, .19 was measured and damp days, recorded as was recorded In 1917, 1330, IPjii and 1542. Abllcne's yearly average rainfall is slightly over 25 inches. In other sections of Texas slow rains, which at some polnls turned to snow or nllcmatcd wltli slcct, brightened agricultural hopes by bringing welcome moisture. Until nnri sleet fell at Denison: rain lurncd lo snow at Plalnview and at Amarillo. and the Amarillo weather bureau warned that Jive- slock In that Panhnndle section be protected last nlRht [Saturday) neainst slightly below freezing tem- pera lures. The brought .62 moisture to the Plalnview area. Olhcr readings were: Dallas .68. Fort Worth .52, San Antonio .87. Houston .16. Big Spring .44, San Snba 1.67, Elcctra 1 inch. Tcinnerntiircs reported to the Dallas weather bureau at pm. Saturday ranged upward to ihe 100- ranxen upward to ihi from all causes 16 deaths. from 32 d s Texas had a single fatality, the tercd at such points as Amarillo m A Ir-iffir- nr-rIHonl ___. nnt not a "I8'1' C' 'ost-althoilgh that Is clusive evidence of success-- u. ore lhan doubled during the year During December the Eighth Air Force destroyed more than 330 German planes at a low of 168 heavy bombers. Vandegrifl lakes fEA Takes Over uimiicwu ui ndriiies :r p. Program :nlury-old tradition, wilh a -er-; Cc cnade and toasts quaffed In ho1. WASHINGTON. Jan. 1 t co T. Crowlej's Foreign buttered ram. was observed by the Marines corps today Lt.'ocu. Alexander A. Vandegrift became ISth commandant of the corpb. It was in 1801 or about that ic admims'.ration took over today all the forcfe" food development and buying operations forrecriy handled by the Department of Ae- rlciiliu.-e's Commodity Credit Cor- time _, hat the Marine band te 'o'a ion andiT stood be-fore the quarters nr 111, f tho Admln- comT.sr.dant and played .tlrrir-.? i 'l as a new Marine! Wm U rxpetted to result of a traffic accident. Williamson Plans Farm Cooperation DALLAS, Jan. H. H. Williamson, recently appointed ag rlcultural relatlojis adviser lo the Office uf Price Administration, said ioday he planned to work with farmers as much as siosslblc through farmer organizations and agricul- tural educatior..il "We want thc farmers lo know more about what OPA Is Irving 10 accomplish and wr want our outfit to know more n'oo'iv the problems." Williams fald. "To do this, we arc poins to use farm facilities which already arc In aw. and Psnipa. Ranges were put In excellent wln- ler condition hy the rain at Big Spring. Other points reporting light rain Included Paris, Pampa, Wichita Falls, Lnbbock. Waco. Austin. Cor- pus Cllrlsli, Beaumont. Sulphur Springe, and Tcxarkana. Clarendon had light snow. Born in Different Years, But Twins BJM.TlJfont1. Jan 1 weren't even bom thc same year, yet they arc twins. Kathleen Rouan. daujhier of Mr. and Mrs. Leo Rowan, made her dc- acinucs wnicu nircany arc in use. aim Mrs. Leo Rowan, made her dc- Amaril jnd we're going lo work tulh thc [but with just three minutes of old son. Inf. farmer. Not for or against him." j 1943 lelt to run. and twin-sister Williamson said he pbinud con Terences sometime In February with farm leaders of Texas and Ohio In Dallas ar.tt Cleveland. Mary Rovan followed suit when Vowell, AC. was just three mlnulcs old. Attendants at St. Joseph's hos- CE. pital said It was thc first case of the kir.d in their experience. through 28 more villages west and noithwest of reaching point! within SO miles of Ihe Latvian bor- der. On the ninth day of Ihe great break-through loward Poland and Rumania by Gcu. Vatutin's men communique said thc Russians captured 300 more villnges and !i_....- Icls. Hundreds of Germans being mowed down in flight tnken prisoner, U added. The Germans were nbondonlng big guns, hundreds of trucks and great stores of ammunition as tho Russians plunged on Ihrough gups lorn In a 200-mllo stretch of German east mill. With the capture ot Belokoro- vlclii, an Important rail center, Ihe first Ukrainian army had advanced some ?8 miles beyond Koroslcn at the uorthweslern end of thc Kiev salient. Vatulin's army also was mov- ing on Berdlchcv, another key mil center 25 miles below cap- lured Zhllomlr. In all the war bulletin sate! Germans were killed In the. Kiev salient. Front dispatches of the Qer- mans retreating so Inst they left decorated Christmas irees in their quarters while the scope of the Nazi dcmorallzaiijn was underlined by the Soviet communique's referenca lo ihe routing of a German divi- sional headquarters. Be'.okorovlclil, a roll center, ts 28 miles beyttid Korostcn nnd the same distance from Ihe old Polish border. Thc communique also announced i (hat Gen. Ivan Bagramlan's first Baltic army had captured 28 popu- lated areas west and northwest of Ncvel in a relieved drive toward Latvia. Olhcr Red army units tightening Ihelr hold on Vitebsk be- low .Vcvcl. West Texans Win Temporary Advance WASHINGTON, Jan. t Thc War Department today an- nounced temporary promotions of officers, including 13 lcxar.s, In- cluding: CAPT. TO MAJ. Dcnton-Robert Lucas. Conrod. TO H Paso-Karold Chamberlain Stun E. SKCOND I.T. TO F1R.ST LT. Amarillo Lynn Carroll Totnlin.- Selman City Maurlcs Alton Eujene Capt, Jr. Wichita Falls Jack Bernard Meads bakery nnd his grand- parents are Mr. ar.d J. R. Smith of Tye ar.d Mr, end Mrs. M. L. Vaughn, 333 Highland. The baby weighed eight pounds and six and three fourths ounces. He was thc first boy to be born un Mr. Vaughn's fide of the family In 2 n4 lr> U M n M si St 4', .to u (i K Ill I" p. Continues Subsidy WASHINGTON, Jan. I _ _ The War Food ariminUlratio- ai> today thc contimiation its dairy subsidy program tiirr.ueh January with a boost in minimum Buys Oil Company DALLAS. Jan. 1 ift, __ j g independent oil operato- f2id today he had purchased In-' Circle Oil company of Houston its 52 wolls In Texas. Oklahoma .ind for a cash considera- tion cf Sl.aCO.dOO. The transfer became effeclhe al lo help compensate (or re-: rnidnlBht last sa.'d Stoddartl fent increase m' He Mid Ihe properties had nn the ceding ol corn. mated reserve cf l.OOO.OQO barrels. lion ;aid Inday. Hacsard early nc-a week will begin editing; WASHINGTON. Jzn. t- the inacazi.ie I Tne Army and Navy Jo'.irr.f up Federation mj- Iraiif.'oni'.fd some of the bland] into heaviiy fortified TM Cairo meeting of President Roosevelt, Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek and Prime Minister Cluircm': pledged to strip Japan of the but the ccmmunlqiie1 made no specific reference of their riisposilio.i. Japan was not men- vv.v...u ,..L tlor.ed iti the communique from the school (i snd Caro'.irr Teheran conrerciice, In which Pre- Ini the nation with Texas Farm awarded to Japan by the n-.icr Sialin o; Russia, Ch'.irchlll Buitau Federation, I o! Nation! under mandate. She his and the President participated. director ol Ihe farmer :hat leaders at the Cairo ar.d cooperatives which sponsor that Teheran conference agreed that Ihe United States should xet Ihe Japa- nese mandated Islands t'.i thc Pa- icific alter the war. CV Haggard is a former Abl-' Thtse are Ihe Mr.itegif. former having tauijnt JounialUm at. Genr.ar. colonies of thc "Marismws. piibliratir.n, the nour.cement said.   

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