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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: December 17, 1938 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - December 17, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               Abilene Reporter "WITHOUT, OK WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKliTCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT LVIH, KO. 200. mil CAP) ABILENE, TEXAS, SATURDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 17, 1933.-TEN PAOE8, PRICE FIVE CENTS. AS FLAMES LICK THROUGH COUNTRY CLUB Pictured at the height of the laze h this east view of the Abilene country club, replica of George Washington's Mount Vernon, as flames roared through the frame structure fanned by a strong south wind, of undeterm- ined origin, the lire was estimat- ed to have caused dam- age. (Reporter-News staff photo) AS FEDERALS KNOCK ON DOOR OF HOME- Swindler Fires Bullet Into Brain Fire Razes Country Club, Loss Is Placed At Flames Origin Undetermined Directors Called To Plan Building New Club Monday Flames of undetermined or- igin early yesterday afternoon left in ruins the Abilene coun- try and so- cial center of the city for al- most two decades. BUILDING TOTAL With the exception of furniture from the ladies lounge and a small (mount of locker room equipment, officers of the club said last night the building was a total loss. "A portion of the south wall Is ilill J. P. Bohannon, vice-president, said, "We might get or salvage out of the razed building." The loss was estimated at about Including the building, fur- niture, equipment and additions. Flames destroyed everything in the ballroom, dining room, kitchen and much of the locker room. The club carried insurance scattered aicon? a number of 1 Abilene agnctes totaling atout on the bulldinc and 500 on furniture. Bohannon said last night that a directors' meeting had been called for Monday and plans would be made then for construction ol a new club house. The club had been reserved every night but one between now and New Year's for dances and social events. The Paul Jones club dance, scheduled for last night was can- celled. CUSTODIAN GIVES ALARM Origin of the blaze was stil in definite last night. R. F. Joyner, manager of the club, said no noe was in the building when the fire started. He was called to the scene by a negro custodian, and found the entice east wall of the ballroom ablaze. "When I got into the he said, "the draaeries and the See FIRE, ff. 3, Col. 2 Nazi Interest In Ukraine Rises BERLIN. D2C. Ule Balkans already in Germany's eco- nomic orbit, sgins lo increas- ing nazi interest in the Ukraine. This Interest in the Ukranlans manifested itself today in' numer- ous ways. 1. Press announcements asked all "stateless" Russians n-ho declined to become Soviet Russian send their names and personal data to "the Ukrainian confidential office which lakes care of the interests of state- less Ukrainians living within the German reich." 2. Editorials the situa- tion of the Ukrainians and (here were radio broadcasts, from Ger- many In the Ukrainian language. 3. Nazi economic writers indicat- ed Germany would hold to a steady course in her economic push to the East even In llic face of a possible British-subsidized trade war. CLUB BURNING NOT TO CHECK ROUND OF YULE ENTERTAINING Paul Jones Club Dance Called Off But Next Event On Calendar Reset The holiday social picture In Abi- lene likely will not' be change! a great deal by the fire that destroy- ed the club house at the Abilene country club. In spite of the fact that the club house was to have been the senceof parties nearly every day from now New apparently will be little let-up In entertaining. Telephone'lines were busy yester- day afternoon calling oil (he Paul Jones club' Christmas dance last evening at the club. The party was too big and it was too late to find another place, said Mrs. Bob Hopoe, one of the hostesses, last night. Re freshments already prepared were lost In the fire, amounting to a loss of The next party on the Count- club calendar, merely has postponed.'It was a "dance, to have been held Tuesday evening wltlrtlr. and Mrs. Dan Gallagher, Mr., and Mrs. Bob Hankln and Mr. and Mrs. See PARTIES, Pf. 3, Coi. 8 Pammount's Goodfellow Party Billed For Friday The Paramount theater Friday announced its annual GoodfeHow which everyone can be entertained and at the same time do a good turn lor the needy, The patty Is open to everyone though meant particulary u an opportunity for kiddles to enjoy themselves and do their part to help the Goodfellow cause. This Is the fclan; At a. Friday morning, December 23. the Paramount w.H screen a program for which admission be only the contribution of canned goods, groceries ol any kinds, fruit, toys or old clothes. The Paramount is furnishing the program free. Goods taken In ill be turned over to the Good- felfows for distribution to the needy in regular Goodfellow baskets. Remember the admission "price: Just whatever one has on hand that might be used by the needf. The program will include "Earth- worm the feature picture, with Joe E. Brown; 'Mick ey's Amateurs" with Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck; "Roamin' with the Our Gang kids; "I Likes Babies and with Popeye. Plenty of laughs? Sure. Contributions to the cash end of the Good fellow fund came slowly Friday, amounting to only Contribution) Friday O-'h ,.J 7.00 AWUne Pan-Hellenic MJn. L. Allen 1-acy Mr. and Mrs. W. K. Millrr Esthtr Bible club Cash anfl Mn. W. W. Hair Cash (Kit Club. SleMutrv Boy Scouts. Troop 13 Mr. anrl Mrs. Jns. A. Pc-zAer J. E. Bumam Five Are Killed As Train Strikes Auto DRESSER JUNCTION. Wis.. Dec. persons were killed and-two others, one of them 6 seven months old baby, rere seriously In- lured when their automobile was struck by a Eoo line passenger irnin late today on a grade crossing a mile a half bortii of here. FaTTilly SocL.iL club" legion AuxItUry Dance (idc3i'Uo 2..SO 00 6.00 1. 00 2.30 2.00 IVOO Express Messenger Plunges To Death CONNELSVILLE. Pa. Dec. express messenger, clinging desperately with a companion to the side of a blazing car plunged to his death tonight as the Balti- more and Ohio train sped on, its crew unaware of the tragedy, E. D. Owens. 45, of New York City, the messenger, had held on almost five minutes, with flames licking out of (he door, and the train going 50 miles an hour before tvs grip slipped. His face and hands were burned and so were those of his companion, Martin Bgan, ot Gales Balk Rescue Of Boat Survivors JUNEMJ. Alaska. Dec. Gales on tJie Alaska coast bal'Md rescue attempts by air and sea to- day, leaving 18 survivors of the grounded molorship Patterson ma- rooned for the fifth successive day at their isolated beach camp. Customs officers announced hire tonight Pilot PCS Cook of Northern airways might attempt, when wea- ther permits to land a whecl- tquipped plane on Ihe beach near the shi-pwrcclced men. 21 Lions Run Up Lead In Bowl Score at 9 p. time night In the Lion's club Christmas Cheer boirl tfame was three-touchdowns to noth- ing In favor of Christmas Cheer and against Empty In Addition to the dimes required (o make the three touchdowns, 16 dimes had been placed down on the drive ward 3 fourth tully. The Lions are gunning for 10 touchdowns, and at present Ihcy arc going (hat way hand- ily, with an average of two touchdowns per day in the day and a hair the game has been underway. Bandit Fox Dies In Gas Chamber SAN QUENTIN. Calif., Dec. Southwest's bandit "fox died loday as defiantly as he lived last ot five men who pall with their lives for the "bloody Sunday" riot at Folsolm prison 1 months ago. Santa Annan Lays Ruin To Patents Holder Bottle Company Denied License, Probe Is Told 8. A. Coleman, former presi- dent of Knape-Coleman glass manufacturing concern of San- ta Anna, told a monopoly in- vestigating committee in Wash- .ing-ton Friday that ruin of his firm was brought about by ,the Hartford Empire company, OWBW of vital glasj machinery atents. SLOW DEATH' Coleman told the Investigators .hat the Hartford company, subject C the Investigation, had put the {nape-Coleman company out of uslness by "a sort of slow death rrangement." The Knape-Coleman company fhlch employed 25 men at Santa tana and was capitalized for is no longer In existence. The anta Anna factory had been aban- oned and some of the equipment old. Coleman said his concern be- gan miking milk bottles In 1934, at which time no other Teiai concern manufactured them. Within iwa months, be said, Harlford Empire charged in- fringement of patents. He was "invited to Hartford" to dlscnil the matter, he added. Coleman said Hartford officials efused him a milk bottle license In Texas, at the same time refusing to dmlt that an Oklahoma plant had n exclusive license for milk bottls production for the Texas territory Coleman sstd .negotiations with lartford Involved a sort of "third degree" and that he warned Hart ord officials' that "In Texas, during my lifetime, I had seen men hang ing to trees .tor doing ..-less than Hartford wiu doing; to m; mall company." SETTLED OVT OF COURT He said he kept out of the courts year, but finally hired an atlor ney. Hartford arrived with "half a rain-load" of legal said ind he tried to sfttle. The infringe merit suit was settled out of court Coleman testified, under an an jemcnt which permitted them o operate for six months, after which they were to ship their feed er machines to Hartford. After losing the machinery, rh. company attempted to continue dp eratlon by means of hired hand ;atherers to feed the glass, replac ing the machines, but found costs excessive. Other testimony at he trial show ed that the Hartford company ha1 earned steadily increasing profit after 1932, when virtually all th glass contained Industry had com under its licenses. In 1931, it wa shown, Hartford Empire's return o capital and surplus amounted to 35.43 per cent and its return on Tie capital employed in operations t iS.11 per cent. The Knape-Coleman company ha been out of operation for about Its closing down has resulte n all except two of the, former em ployes moving out of Santa Anni Coleman retired as president of th :lrm three years ago. Operation of the plant began 1934, Oscar cheaney, Santa Ann bank official, recalled last nigh Sand was obtained from the Sanl Ann a. mountain, at base which the plant and the entfr town of Santa located Although the plant at times pro duced other types of bottles an lugs, production of milk bottles wa [he backbone of the business. The Knape-Coleman company ha been dissolved. Machinery In th plant has been sold for scrap Iro aud the metal building housing th plant will either be wrecked or con verted into a wood warehouse, cording to Santa Anna sources. Eleven minutes after in California's the fume. new 51 chamber Ed Davis. 38, elusive mem bcr of an outlaw gang, was pro nouncrxi dead. Almost his last act. completed lab oriously, was lo write a note say ing "I never have and not now as mercy either from God or man.' Rayburn Discounts Congress Coalition DALLAS. Dec. "111 be no coalition of Tlier democrat and republicans in the coming con gress. Congressman Sum Raybur ol Bonham, house majority leade said here today. Rayburn, on wnose shoulders wl. again fall the task of carrying ou th> legislative pro jrram snrt keeping parly member In line, predicted harmony woul prevail m legislative halls at Wash Inglon. Three Brothers Are Put Under Bond Authorities Dig Up Bizzore Past Of Family Behind Drug Company Hoax NEW YOEK, Dec. Donald Coster, an incredi- le dual personality of evil financial genius, who wiped out his arlier identity as Convict Philip Musica to become head of an drug concern, killed himself today at his Fairfield, country estate. He fired a bullet into his head at the very moment a squad federal authorities was knocking on bij ornate door to rear, est him in the investigation of a great financial scandal involv- ng his and Bobbins, Inc. While Coster was dying in the Connecticut mansion, au- horitiea in New York identified George Veraard, Canadian gent of the corporation, and two of its other employes as brothers of the financier. They were "George assistant treasurer of the firm, and "Robert Diet- a purchasing agent. ARRAIGNED IN STOCK CASE Late in the day, Vernard was arraigned on a grand jury In- dictment charging him with filing false Information on McKesson and Bobbins stock listings, Robert Dietrich, youngest of the brothers, was arraigned on a simple charge of violating the SEC act. They were held in each. The same bail was required of George Dietrich upon his ar- raignment In New Haven. Coster, Vernard and Dietrich already were under Indictment for making false statements to the New York stock exchange In con- nection with McKesson and Robbins securities sold to the public, and New Yorkers Cheer Eden As He Sails NEW YORK, Dec. Ai thoriy Bden. former British foreis secretary', sailed for home toda with the cheers of several thou sand New Vorkers ringing in h ears. "Keep it up Tony." some shouts when his party arrived at the lin Queen Mary on which he was re turning after a week's visit. Californian Pleads Guilty To Bigamy SAN JOSE. Calif.. Dec. Boyd Burke. 52. the milkman two wlvi's. glumly pleaded guilty charges today before a Jud: who commented the defendant p? haps has loved "too well." The wives. Mrs. Evelyn Burke an Mrs. Lillian Burke, each 18, we not In court. Dancer Improves HOLLYWOOD, Dec. Eva Tanguay's condition was so Im proved tonight that ner pttystcla for the first time, expressed conf ctence the 69-year-old actress wou recover from a grave illness. NEW YORK, Dec. of JtcKesson Bob- bins, Inc., plummeted to juflr lows In "over the counter" markets to- day. The common stock wu quoted at 75 cento a snare bid, 91 asked, compared with the final sale at on the New York stock exchange before dealings lit McKesson Robbins Issues were suspended De- cember 7 last Preferred slock was quoted at S7.2S share bid, asked, contrasted with the last stock exchange price of 535.M. their for Coster and Dietrich and lor had been'set at comparatively low figures. But the hour o( Csoters unmasking as Philip-Musica, a nun with a criminal record jolnj back 30 yean or more, had come last night, and this morning the process of revelation had cone on until the novtrnmfnl decided to re-arrtst the three and ask bond. Piling on top of disclosures that more than one Musica brother had made a new name and a new life were other developments that completely overshadowed for the moment the central purpose of a four-sided investigation that for more than a week has sought to dis- cover the reason for an apparent overstatement of Mc- Kesson and Robbins assets. These'developments includes disclosures that was innlnd 25 rears ago In the million-dollar collapse' of the United States Hair suspended ef (hipping arm] to bellfertnts abroad in cases labeled "milk of magnesia." It turned out, too, that he might have been the hidden backer for the Spanish government ship Cantabrica which was sunk about a year ago with a cargo of munitions which the TJ. a government had vainly tried to keep In this country. It developed, too, that Coster at one time in his life had even a third during the world war he was an investigator In the attorney general's office, engaged principally on crimes of espion- age under the name of "William Johnson." From Iht description of Assistant U. S. Attorney Art Gorman of the visit of the federal men to Coster's home. It apDured the elder- ly promoter hid his lost decision jolt their arrival. "I arrived about noon In company with about ten other men connected with the United States marshaU'a office in New said Gorman. "We had come to take Coster Into custody for the nurpose cf raising his bond before the (U. S.) commissioner in New Haven. "As we stood at the door we heard from upstairs. The house- hold was in turmoil. I have seldom seen such hysteria or heard cuch weepinsr as was set up Immediately. "U. S. Marshall Bernard Fitch ran upstairs and found the body of Coster in the bathroom, a bullet through, his head. He was dead-, thoroughly dead when Fitch found him. "Mrs. Coster was panic-stricken and hysterical almost beyond control. "With us was Dietrich. When he heard the shot he ruddenly became a broken man. He wept pitifully and carried or when he had Bee MTJSICAS, fg. 3, Col. 3 FDR, Garner Confer Today On Legislation President Silent On Successor To Roper In Cabinet WASHINGTON, Dec. 16 Roosevelt and 7ict> president Garner will ave a chat about legislative robiems tomorrow for the irst time congress ad ourned last summer. UNCH AND TALK Garner has a White House ap- wtntment for lunch and a talk with Roosevelt afterward. The conference will give them an pportunity to exchange previews f the new- way re- ised party lineups will function nd prospects for the adminlstra- lon program and for individual measures. Since the senate, over which Gar- icr presides, must approve major residential appointments, specula- tion arose over whether Mr. Rcose- elt would consult Garner on pros ective cabinet and supreme cour elections. The president was silent at his ress conference today on his pos ible choices. He gave no indication f when the appointments, might be xpected. HOPKINS, CHIEF TALK Later In the day, the chief execu tlve presided at a cabinet meeting attended by Daniel C. Roper anc Harry L. Hopkins, who Is mention -A as a possible successor to Rope j commerce secretary. Hopkins who sits In on cabinet meetings be cause he runs the WPA, remained with the president after other cabl net members had left. The arrival of Ambassador Josep Kennedy from England brough ills name Into the abpi new there 'was jom talk Kennedy mlghFtiVi-the'com merce Secretary' War Harry Wbodrtng might go London as ambassador, and Lo Johnson might move up from j slstant secretary to secretary u war. Kennedy told reporters, how ever, that he expected to eontlnu his envoy's post. O'Daniel Calls Trip Success CLEVELAND, Dec. as' Governor-Elect W. O'Daniel, who campaigned with hill billy music, left Ohio tonight alter a busy day singing the praises of his native state. O'Daniel. accompanied by his wife, his 16-year-old daughter, Mol- ly, and Carr P, Collins, Dallas in- surance man, boarded a train for St. Louis, where they plan a brief stop tomorrow to inspect shoe fac- tories. They expect to arrive in Tex- as Sunday morning. The governor-elect, character- izing hfs self-styled "food-will" tour as highly successful, said he would continue his campaign to "sell the on the ad- vantages of Texas." O'Daniel came here to take the train after spending last night and today as a guest of Russell A. Fire- stone, manager of the mechanical goods division ol the Firestone Tire fe Rubber Co., who escorted him through the vast Firestone plants. He denied he was attempting- to ''take any of the rubber business out of Akron" but said Firrstone was "very interested'1 In Texas as an ex pansion site. 'Of course .nothing- definite was done." O'Daniel said, "we were just sowing the seeds on this trip." Reds Arrested ATHENS. Greece. Doc. Athens police announced today wha; they termed a decisive blow at the remaining communist ele- ment in Greece with the arreit of >A persons and seizure of docu- ments, leaflets and a printing ma- chine. See Third Bid OMAHA, Neb., Dec Sen- ator Edward R. Burke   ircb jcuthtait lo north on Ifte t, >VEST TEXAS: Generally fair, In fcatral ind :calb SjtaidAj; San- fttr, Karmrt !ti north portca, HOCR P. M. ........._ usid trmpfratares m. 1! amj vmif dat 'FEATURED BY SIDE ISSUES- Snyder Trial Near Close LOS ANGELES, DFC. testimony dealinj with ait issues marked the virtus! completion today of evidence-takini! at the trail of "Colonel" Mirtin Snyder. accused of attempting lo murder 30-year-old Myrl Alderman, former accompanist of Snyder'j divorced wife, radio sinser Ruth" tinj. Jimmy Fidler, who broadcasts Hollywood movlt colony news and gossip, and John Swallow, radio program director, denied Alderman had seivtd M a procurer of women foe them as Snyder Inti- mated on the stand yesterday. The 44-year-old Snyder himself insisted he knew nothir.g of a letter addressed to him at his Holly- weed hotel by a New York girl staying at the hotel nt the time. The letter, skned said she had surrendered to Bnyder two nljhls before Vhe Alderman shootine and upbraided him tor neglecting her the next day. Prosecutor A. U. Blalock pounded at Snyder for an answer as to whether statements in the letter were true. All Snyder would ;ay was that he had never ieen It before. Alderman and Miss Etting. who f'.ew to Las Vegas. Nev.. and married Wednesday, and Miss Snyder all denied Snyder'.-, testimony of yesterdav that AMerman produced a pistol just Snyder shot him. In the music room of Alderman's home, Thcv said Snyder's pistol wis the only one la the room at the time.   

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