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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: November 25, 1938 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - November 25, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               Most Thankful: Texas, Upset Victor Over Aggies; Breckenridge. Oil Belt's New WEST TEXJLS' HEWSMKR VOLLVIII. NO. 178. "WITHOUT. OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR WES WE SKgKJH YOURWORLD EXACTLY- AS IT ABILENE, MQRNING, NOVEMBER 25, 1938____FOURTEEN PAGES. mit PRICE FIVE CENTS FROM HOME AND ABROAD- COMPLETE ACCORD AFFIRMED- U. S. TOLERANCE BRINGS THANKS _ TJ T t t Britain join in Defense theme of the prayers nrnl addresses of Ameri- liavc strayed from (lie nrecenls of (he 'Ker- -----------------------________________________ theme of the prayers nrnl addresses of Ameri- cans nn both sides of tlic Atlantis in Thanks- giving Day observances. Ambassador Joseph P. Kennedy, speak- ing at the Thanksgiving dinner of American society in London, praised the democracies for their respect .for the rights of minorities. The failure to rec- ognize these rights, he said, leads to "in- ternal decay, external weakness and dis- content and, perhaps, to civil conflict." In Plymouth, where Thanksgiv- ing Day originated, a young rabbi, Sam. uel F. Friedman, spoke in the church of the pilgrimage at the invitation of the pastor, Rev. Carl Knudson. The sermon, said the Christian minister, was to he. "our answer to anti-scmitism." "We are said Hnbbi Friedman, "in living in a country where law ami order abide for I lie welfare of its inhabitants; where its enjoy liberty, and the right to pursue happiness The very fact that Jews are present in this church now, nml a ruhlii is swcr which true Christians give to those who liavc strayed from (lie precepls of the 'Ser- mon on tlic A message of gratitude was sent to President Roosevelt by the 600 delegates to the annual convention of the Junior Hadassah, young women's Hebrew organ- ization. 'We are they said, a government and a nation that condemns by word and act the terror and vandal- ism that certain other lands wreak upon their own citizens. We are thankful for the spirit and humanity that have stirred millions of Americans to speak loud and told against persecution and to offer their help in rescuing the victims of un- paralleled The president and Mrs. Roosevelt, spending dation and their families, radio talk at 7 p.m., nnd after dinner patients presented ail entertainment in his honor. NO VIOLENCE REPORTED Abilene's Holiday Quiet Food Baskets Given Needy Breck, Austin Gridiron Games Chief Attractions Abllcne's unusual holiday spirit prevailed yesterday. _ The parking meters were If they had not been, few nickels would have gone Into. them. irere no There were no automobile accidents. were no sudSm deaths! There were no traeriencf it the hospitals. There- were no planes landing at the airport. There were only a few drunk] the police utation. Newspapermen, policemen and firemen went about their routine duly. Everybody else slept until noon, ate a big turkey dinner and then left town. Outside of a few cafes, the city's six theaters were the only business houses open. Movie house man- agers reported a good business, not unusual but Just "good." A fair crowd gathered to see the Abilene Black Eagles shellaclc an El Paso football team, 31-0. Police arrested two persons for shooting craps down on China street TREKKERS RETURN Toward night the Influx of Abl- lenlans from the Breckenrldge- Sweelwaler game began to flow Into town. Later on. a number re- turned from the Te-xas-A. A: M. game, Capt. Harry Hutchlnson of the Texas Highway patrol reported last ntght thai little traffic congestion was experienced on the Sweetwater and Breckenridge highway. Six- teen highway patrolmen were pa- troling the dlslrlct. any yesterday morning Abilen- lans of different organizations dis- tributed baskets of food to the needy. Even with that, many fami- lies went through the day of na- tional thanksgiving on less than lh- bare necessities of life. For thankful and unthankful alike. Thanksgiving wore to an end last night. 311 years after the day our forefathers offered quiet prayer for tolerance and freedom from all oppression. Austria Starts New Roundup Of Jews VIENNA. Nov. new roundup of foreign Jews and those unable to produce satisfactory citi- zenship documents was under way fn Vienna tonight with an estimated 300 already arrested. Prisoner Turned Magistrate Takes Look At Cold Outdoors, Gives Self 90 Days IttUll- ----I---------V l-umgJll. tucjj He made a short accord on national defense and diplomatic collab- oration "for the preservation consolidation of peace.'1 BO.VD REINFORCED This display of strong French- BrltUh friendship tied the nations together In a manner similar to the Rome-Berlin axis. By their assurances of mutual cooperation and unity of purpose Uie British and French reinforced the bond started by Premier Dala- dier's first, diploma tic trip to Lon- don which brought a military un- derstanding April 29. It was strengthened by the sum- mer visit of King a corse and Queen Elizabeth to Paris and fur- ther heightened by close collabora- tion during the Czechoslovak crisis Ttic president and Mrs. Roosevelt, spending lne Associated Press. WITH FAVORABLE the day at "Warm Springs, Ga., were hosts last PARIS. Nov. (AP) m f t n ijflil at a turkey dinner fur aljont 500 ot the Great Britain af- f tm fm crippled patients of the Warm Spring., foun- flrmed PiW'oly tonight their LJ.J.1. J.LJ J fl dation and their families. He made a short accord on national 300 Homes And Cabins Burned NEW YORK, Nov.. Styles, SS and homeless, was given a "Thanksgiving special" chance to Impose his own sentence for vagrancy In West Side court today. "What will It asked the magistrate. Styles took one look at the cold, grey skies outdoors. "Ninety he said, and hurried off to chicken dinner In jail. AUTHORITIES TO PROBE USE OF ARMS BY SCHOOL BLACKSHIRTS Oklahoma City Prosecutor Expresses Belief Cult's Activities Not Unlawful OKLAHOMA CITY, Nov. Morris, county attorney safd tonight he did not believe unlawful the activities ot a high school students' Blacltshirt organization which Its leaders said planned a "blood- rnimlnHnn less revolution." Morris said that In communist Russia or fascist Germany and students are protected. In their right, to free speech and secret assembly. "However" said Morris, "we plan to check Into the use of firearms and I'll probably have the boys questioned tomorrow to determine whether there is anv law vlnlatinn nr tonn- there is any law violation or Jeop ardlzing of lives there." Morris' announcement fol- lowed disclosure leaders o! the C C (Curlocitr club) kept ren- dezvous In the country for pistol and rifle practice and have been inTej'.lji'.id for carrying con- cealed weapons. High school officials, who already had conducted their own Inquiry, announced they found .-tate laws provided Inadequate penalties for persons "contributing to Juvenile dclnqucncy" and had given the mat- ter publicity In an effort to Influ- ence parental action against the blackshirted. antt reilglous and semi-military organization. Too Much Stuffing, Officers Diagnose PHILADELPHIA, Nov. Two policemen saw a man ambling along clutching his midriff. "Whats the matter, inquired one. "Yeah, I'm awful sick." Just then the man's overcoat opened ano two turkeys tumbl- ed out. "Too much Thanksgiving was the officers' di- agnosis. They took the man to the station for questioning. Historian Dead BERLIN, Nov. Birch C. Marcks, historian noted for his worfcs on the Blsmarcklan era, died today at lhe age ot 77. THANKFUL FOR 16 Weigh Elbows On Salvation Army's Table For Annual Thanksgiving Feast Thirty-two elbows weighted down lhe table. There was no sound but lhe clink of forks against plates and the shipping ot cooftce. It was Thanksgiving supper at lhe Salvaton Army citadei. To most of the 15 men about the table, the date meant little. They were thankful, to have food in their stomachs again. Long hours of walking and inade- quate protection asalnst a chilling wind sap the energy. Their ages ranged from 16 to 40 years of age. There was not a bum" among them. They were men who had wandered off the j more prosperous paths of life. Joe Schlollcr. custodian nnd chef of the citadel, looked admiringly at the group. "See. Look how they eat. There will be 100 percent more manhood them when they get stom- achs full." Joe's seen a lot of the world him- self. He's Been cafe cook, oil field worker, day laborer and a little of everything. "But Mike this job best or all." See S-ARMV, 13, CoL t Teacher College System Praised DALLAS. Nov. "the periodic attacks on the teach- ers college system." Dr. W. J. Mc- connell Of North Texas State Teachers college tonight declared such schools In the last 25 years have had more significant pro- gram than any other type ol edu- cational institution. His remarks were prepared for delivery at a reunion of former students. He said there "is perhaps more lack of Information with reference to what constitutes proper educa- tion for teachers and prospective teachers, and where it, can be found Ihan In almost any other line of cducatronal endeivor." The regular arts and sciences schools, he said, have attempted to pattern their courses for teachers along the lines used by advanced teachers colleges. Recent years have seen a marked emphasis on teacner training by Institutions which sidestep the name "teachers college." he said. Dr. McConnell. turning to his own school said that a great in- crease In winter enrollment at the Dcnton school, which this fall pass- ed had created a classroom emergency which must be remedi- Rail Clerk Drops Dead In Lubbock LUBBOCK. Nov. 24 -J- Doud, 60. chief clerk to the general manager of the western lines of the Santa Fe railway, dropped dead here this afternoon. Here to attend the Lubbock- Amarillo high school football game he expired a little more than an hour before game lime. He swooned and tell on the side- walk alongside Hilton hotel here and pronounced dead upon hl> arrival at a sanilarivim to which he had been rushed in an ambulance Death was attributed by an In- vestigating physklan ailment !o a heart Former Editor Dies NEW YORK. Nov. Chamberlain And Daladier VoiceStands Detailed Points Of Discussions Not Announced The Associated Press. CHAMBERLAIN nd negotiations peace of Munich. leading to the British Pr'ime Minister Neville Chamberlain and Premier Edouard Daladfer, at the close of conversa- tloas which followed the arrival lere yesterday of Chamberlain and his foreign secretary, viscount Halifax, read statements at Qual D'Orsay In which each stress- ed total agreement on all subjects considered. Neither ot the two leaders, how- ever, mentioned i their discussions, JOINT DIPLOMACY Chamberlain ft r s t announced mentioned detailed points In or peace. In his o u u euilUJLUlCea Britain and Prance had reached complete accord on national de- Joint diplomatic action declaration, read to French and foreign newspapermen he said that: "With us, national defense Is one of the steps to be taken for preservation and conser- vation of peace iniEurope" The British prime minister, In t broadcast declaration said his gov- ernment fully approved conclusion ol a Franco-German pact of non- aggression. Chamberlain and. Lord Halifax were due to return to London to- morrow morning. Dismiss Charges Against Physician HOUSTON, Nor. 24-W-Charxes of unethical practice ajatast Dr Raymond E. Selders of Washington p. c former Huustonlan. have been dismissed by the Harris coun- ty medical society. Dr. w. A.Coole secretary of the society, announced The charges were filed about a ago on the request of the Dis- trict of Columbia medical society the. of Dr- Selders conntc- on with the group health associa- tion clinic of Washington. The Weather HOi'R r.. M, lonVf.e sotwl todij! PARIS. Nov. ish Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain and the Duke of Windsor conferred here to- night on what informed British sources said were plans for the former King Edward VIII to return to England with his American-born wife. The meeting was the first between Windsor and a chief of the British government since he. as king, had 2 last tate with Stanley Baldwin, then prime minister and now Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, shortly before abdicating Dec. 10, 1M6. Almost without .notice the prime mlnlsler, here for talks on defense plans with French statesmen, hurried Into the duke's hotel for a 20-minute conversation. His only compan- ion was the (all British for- eign minister, Viscount Halt- fax. Chamberlain and Halifax ar- rived at the hotel a few minutes after announcing results at their conversations with French officials. The two went Im- mediately to the Windsor apart- ment. Hitler Expected To Give OK To French Accord Spread In Santa Monica Hills Is Halted By Breeze LOS ANGELES, Nov. 24 the aid of favor- able winds, firemen believed they had deflected disastrous brush fires in the Santa Mon- ica and San Bernardino moun- tains today from further se- rious property damage or dan- ger to lives, loss HOOO.MO A westward breeze checked a new spread of the Santa Monica hills blaze which flared up this morning. Danger to1 the San Ber- nardino mountain communities of Crestline and PInehurst was avert- ed when the fire in that region turned west after moving up Devtt canyon. -r- 'T Starting yesterday, the fires had destroyed possibly 300 homes and cabins, mostly in the Santa Monica area, Arrowhead Springs hotel, near San Bernardino Damage may total between and or more de- pending on the havoc wrought on watersheds. The fire-denuded canyon slopes may become serious flood menaces during winter rains, which are due to start soon. Homes reported destroyed In" the Santa Monica area included those of Sam Wood, film director Otto Camllo. brothel- of Leo Carrlllo screen actor, and Laura Mathiessen, noted painter. The S2S.OOO estate of Actor Rich- ard Dlx was reported destroyed last night but It developed later that the names veered around this as well as 1M homes in the Topanga canyon community ot Fernwood, first reported burned ROGERS ESTATE SAVED Seventy five firemen with trucks and hose averted possible destruc- tion of the ranch estate of liic late Will Rogers, actor-humorist, white members of his family load- ed valuable belongings Into vans ready for flight. Possibly acres were burned over In the San Bernardino moun- tain fire which reached almost down to the city of San Bernardino last night. Six CCC youths four Red unre of men fighting this blaze were taken to a San Bernardino hospital for treatment for burns. VENOM USED TO COMBAT MALADY Three-year-oH Donald Rich- trdson (above) submitttd to a' scientific snake "bite" In a Kan- sas City hospital in the hope the. venom from the deadly cotton- mouth water moccasin' would halt capillary.hemorrhages that have left him weak from loss of blood. Dr. Hugh M. Swaney, an Interne, Is Injecting three drops of the venom in Donald's arm. Donald had been admitted to the hospital several days previously from continued nosebleed. (Associat- ed Press Photo.) Mercury Due To Start Rise 18-Degree Low Registered For Morning Hours Htslng temperatures were pre- icted for Abilene and vicinity to- day, following Thanksgiving morn- Ing's dip to f-e IS-degree mark The official forecast read, "fair auu iuur nea- and not quite so cold Friday" lands firemen among the hundreds Thursday temperatures, from noon 01 men llwnMntr t-l-_ A.__ rtn it..._ Burns Kill Woman FORT WORTH. Nov. Mrs. V. L. Logan 30, died this after- noon of burns received when her sathrobe caught fire from a small neater at the Logan apartment six lours earlier. Radio Probe Asked WASHINGTON. Nov. A sweeping congressional Investiga- tion of radio broadcasllng policies was proposed today by Senator White who said he had received Indications of democratic support. AT THANKSGIVING Roosevelt Tells Plans To Expand Infantile Daralysis Fighf To Every County In Land -Before a smiling group of elluw Infantile paralysis victims athercd about him at a homey Thanksgiving banquet. President Roosevelt tonight told of plans to xpand the national foundation -a ight the crippling disease of every o-anty of the land. With Mri. Roosevelt at his side and radio chains carrying his brief talk, across the country, the chief executive traced a twelve-year growth of the health resort ouncicd here and added: Jan. 30, 1939 he 57th we hope to have permanent chapters of this national foundation In all of the more than three thoiuanj counties that make up the United States. "This Thanksgiving day ae hate much to be thankful tor." the presi- dent said, -r vish that alt who hear my voice could be with us and sec this gathering of old and young in the big dining room at Warm Springs. "We are thinking not of our- selves alone but of tens ol thou- sands of other children and groin- ups and wishing for them that they may be having an equally happy Thanksgiving-lots ot turkey lots of fixin's." on, were higher than those for Wednesday, and lasi night (tie mercury was st: -ding well above readings for comparative hours Thanksgiving eve. Low reading for Abilene Thurs- day morning, la degrees, was- taken at 5. 7 and 8 a. n. At the airport bureau, a reading of 17 was taken. All over Texas, low temperatures prevailed. At Liibbock the mini- mum was 7, at Fort Worth 23, at El Paso 16 and at Houston 32. Defense For Lucas Relies On Jacket SAN FRANCISCO. Nov. attorneys today based their hopes of acquittal for two Alcatraz convicts accused of killing a prison guard on a missing con- vict 224. James Lucas, Albany, Tex. bank robber, one of the two convict de- fendants, said he wore Jacket last May when he and Rufus Franklin, co-defendant, "went over (he wall" in an unsuccessful prison break attempt. Lucas denied that he wore an- other Jacket, a blood-stained gar- ment with the number. 123. on its back, which the government had presented In evidence as the one he wore during the attempted break. Barcelona Bombed By Rebel Aircraft BARCELONA. Nov. Hebe! aircraft bombed this belea- guered city at regular intervals to- day leaving a fresh wake ot death and destruction. The populace was torror-strtcken party as one sir raid alarm xurccerfec! another. portant Paris factories. The wave at today's peak Involved more than 74.000 workers opposing the government's new de- cree law tor lengthening the 40- hour work week. premier ordered, and mobile guards and police carried out: J. Requisitions of railroad workers at the Anzin mines, near Valenciennes, for military service tomorrow to assure the transport of coal and protection of the pits. 3. Clearing of plants In the Parts region where occupation strikes brofe out this afternoon. At the height, there were more than 32.000 strikers here but most of the workers tonight had left the plants 3. Clearing 0I 25 factories in the northern region where 12.000 workers were engaged In "stay-In" strikes. This left 30.000 other strikers still occupying plants, mines and railroad yards. The premier still faced a new strike of coal miners In the Valenciennes region called for to- morrow night. Brownwood Man On Turkey Hunt Slain FREDERICKSBURG. Nov. 24 Dietrich. 29. Brownwood died In Keldcl memorial hosptt.ii here at 5 o'clock tonight from gunshot wound in the abdomen re- ceived while he was hunting wild turkey on ranch !S miles from here near Doss. The Brownwooc' man. employe of the Santa Fe railroad, was shot about 2 o'clock, while fitting on the ground by a fellow huntsman who mistook Dietrich [or a turkey. There Von Ribbenfrop To Visit Paris In 'Few Days' BERCHTESGADEff. Ger- many, Nov. Eeichj- fuehrer Adolf Hitler's appro- val of the proposed Franco- German peace declaration wai seen tonight in the announce- ment that Foreign Minister Joachim von Ribbentrop prob- ably would start "within ths next few days for Paris" to sign the agreement. tEADERS CO.VFEK The announcement was made af- ter a conference of the two leaders which followed receptions by Hitler of distinguished foreign gutsls Os- wald PIrow, minister of defense ot the Union of south Africa, first and then King carol and Crown Prince Mlhal of Rumania. Informed sources said the declara- tion would embrace three points: 1. A joint acknowledgment that peaceful and. good neighborly rela- tions between Germany and constitute an essential element to the consolidation of Europe' and maintenance of general worW peace. 3. A statement to the effect no territorial Issues exist between France and Germany of a lively to lead to conflict EicS country, It was said, will declare solemnly that the other's boundaries are Inviolable. 3. An agreement by both, that, Iff event of International diffi- culties or points of Issue concernlna both, to.enter upon joint delibera- tions. FRENCH WUBCTlTS German political clnlei said that the desire (for the declaration an- nounced yesterday In Paris minent and tuillar to the Ango- German declaration made sept 3d by Hitler and British prime Miniiter Neville Chamberlain, was first ex- pressed on the French side. The tenor of such a declaration formed the chief topic of conversa- tion between Hitler and. Francols-Poncet on Oct. la during the litter's farewell visit as retiring ambassador to Berlin. French Foreign Minister Geergw Bonnet and German Ambassador Count Johannes von Welczeclc la Paris nest took up the matter and it was continued by von Ribbentrop and Robert Coulondre, Francois. Poncefs successor In Berlin. The round of dlscuslonj was com- pleted Tuesday when presented his letters of credence to Hitler. Before he settled down with Ton Ribbentrop for discussion on proposed draft, Hitler conferred for an hour with PIrow and was wtthi King Caroi for three hours. Hitler and Pirow were stated to nave discussed, a number of general problems, Including relations be- VISIT cSLED 0rEat Br'Uln- Pirow s' European trip, which w Daladier Fights French Strikes Railroad Workers Are Ordered Into Military Service PARIS, Nov. 21. Premier Edouard Daladier, assuming com- plete control of anti-strike maneuv- ers tonight, ordered 4.CCO railroad employes at Valenciennes Into mill- tary service and the clearing of im- and Germany, was descrlb- ed as Informal tour of prlvata GERMANY, Tt. 13. CoL 8 SAYS GOODBYE Tlic bodr will be sent to Brown- wood tonight Dr. Kans Dieckhoff. German ambaisador. is shown at tfco stitj department in Washing- ton as he arrived for a brief Mil on Secretary Hull. Am- bassador Dieckhoff salt! ha came simply to bid farewell and did not hav: any messaje from hli fovcmmfnt. He is to Mil for Germany in a tew days to report on the attitude in Amer- ica toward the German i Associated. P s j Phoio.)   

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