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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: November 17, 1938 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - November 17, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               WEST TEXAS' OWN HEWSMKR VOL. LVIII, NO. 170. "WITHOUT. OR WITH OFFENSE OR TOES WE SKE'.UJ YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS rrru (tin Banker Scores Pensions, Cost Of Government New President- Sees Additional Business Burden HOUSTON, Nov. A. Benson of Brooklyn. N. Y.. newly fleeted president o! the American Bankers association, In hts llrst public utterance since his 'elector) today, cried out, tonight against ol( SBC jpensons and the mounting cos of government. "Prom time Immemorial there have been those who wanted some- thing lor he said. "The painful road toli had no appeal. Give us, they say, substantial pensions and we will agree to spend the money and consume goods." Benson said apparently those who sought state old age pensions had lost sight ot Ihe 'act they would be taking something they had not earned. He charged the government was taking a larger and larger share o( the products ot Industry each year. "No one would curtail the ordi- nary and necessary functions of gov ernment." he said. "Our lives; liber- ties, fortunes and well being depend on them. But to extend government beyond Its regular sphere, to widen Its activities, to Increase greatly the number who derive support from It, creates an additional bur- den on Industry and one that 11 should not have to Dear." ELECTION UNANIMOUS Benson's address was delivered to Ihe savings division of the ABA a few hours after the convention had unanimously elevated him from the llrst vice prcslaency to succeed President Orval W Adams of Salt Lake City, Utah. Robert M. Hants of Winston-Salem, N. C., was elect- ed first vice president and P. D Houston of Nashville, Tenn., was elected second vice president. Houston won a th'ree cornered race In which he was opposed by W. Laird Dean ot Topeka, Kas.. and Frank P. Powers of Mora, Minn. Dean offered the motion miking Houston's election unanimous. from old age pensions to Ihe rising tax collections of local, slate and national governments, Benson said: 'True, some of this money goes for relief and for public works, but regardless of Its use, the burden rests an all wage earners and all property owners. I know there are Mme who think the rich pay all the taxes, but that Isn't so. It Isn't true either that government has "some magic way of. getting money Government hasn't discovered how la get somelhlng for nothing. "The country as a whole' can not be helped by the purchase of vast quantities of a storing II away In a vault. On the contrary, the country jj harmed by ABILENE, MORNING, NOVEMBER 17, 1938.-SIXTEEN PAGES. JUDGE OBJECTS TO HER SLACKS When Helen Hullck, 28-year- .old Los Angeles kindergarten teacher, shown above with a load of lawbooks and attired In her slacks, persisted In wear- Ing that garb in the courtroom ol Municipal Judge Arthur Guerln-the Judge ordered.her sent to jail for five days for contempt, she was a witness against two negroes charged with robbing her house. The Judge complained that witnesses and prisoners 'alike paid more attention to women thus attir- ed than to the court. (As- sociated Press Photo.) Allre'd Commutes Death Sentence Negro To Serve Life For Killing AUSTIN, Nov. stroke of Governor James V. Allred's pen today commuted to Imprison- ment the death sentence assessed Sam cash, south Texas negro, a little more than 30 hours before his scheduled trip to the electric chair. The chief executive followed the recommendation of a majority of _Lf_., Olll-t yaiuieo m .1 did not Cash gullly of Ihe murder of Paul Henlg, wharton county merchant, Dec. The board's recommendation came alter long Investigation of a statement from Fobte Grays, an- other negro also convicted ot the robbery slaying who In a death nouse statement claimed Cash had nothing lo do with the murder of Henli; who resided In Olenflora. Japs Bomb Capital Of Shensi Province SHANGHAI. Nov. IS.-wy-Japa- nese planes today raided Sian, capi- lal of ShDnsi province, in a new effort lo sever communicalions be- tween thc Soviet union and China The airmen reported they had cut the Lunjhal railway there, some 300 miles from its western terminus blasted the railway station and In- flicted heavy losses on Chinese troops. Ballinger Jury tote-Men Two Indictments' Charging Cattle Theft Returned BALUNGER, Nov. rwo liquor control board Bob Oambell of Abilene and Bill Strickland of San no- billed loday by a 119th district court grand jury Investigating the shoot Ing October 31 of Dan Uvcrman. Gambel! and Strickland had been charged with murder, and were a liberty under bond. The grand jury a action clears them of blame in the case. was shot October 21 as a group of liquor control men sought to serve a warrant to him, and died October 23. Twelve imcbllb were returned. Those persons Indicted who are In custody Include: Walter Hoelscher and Erwln Klaus, two cases ot cattle thett and one of burglary; O. O. Barton, for- gery and passing; Dan Hoelscher. forgery; Hugh Caffcy, forgery and passing; and Virgil Bates, burglary. District Judge O. L. Parish set the date for the Whit Jones mur- der case, which was transferred from Concho county to this county, for Monday, November 21. Members of grand Jury for this term ot court were Hamp Byler. foreman; D. T. Gardner, H. M. Roberts. Leo Moulter, Reese Jones. J. R. Harris, s. At. Seay. E. N. Dean, H. J. LIsso, L. M. Hambrlght, R. H. Broughton and W. H. caalhran. High School Girl Drowned In River SHREVEPORT. La.. Nov. Lee Bison, IT-year-old Shreveport high school sophomore, fell to her death late today into the Red river from the new Huey P. tang bridge at the foot of Texas :addo Parish, authorities found a note in her pocket book nearby on the bridge. In which the girl said she was friendless and could not return to an orpranage here in which she had lived since she was three years old. AS WAVE OF INDIGNATION MOUNTS- PRICE FIVE CENTS U. S. Scourges Germany On Violence I I t I I f% _______ 4 _ Advance New Hitler Charges FDR Imagining Menace To U. Reaction First To Arms Plan; Jews In Fear BERLIN, Nov. (Thurs Adolf Hitler's Voelkischer Beobachtev in cap tions said today President Roosevelt in hi: White House press conference pictured an imaginary menace to America to further an armaments pro gram. DIPLOMATS RITES TODAY "Roosevelt's Imaginary 'menace to the caption read In ono-of the few German morning papers to print a brief account of Tuesday's Interview. "Suspicions cast on other powers In the Inter- ist of United States armaments." U was the first reaction printed n Germany to the United Slates president's announcement that air force plans contemplated defense of both North and South America Yesterday was s. Protestant holi- day, the Day of Atonement, and most government officials were en route'to DuesseldorMor the funera of Ernst vom Hath, slain diplomat The Lokalanzelger, another of Ihe post-holldaj newspapers to carry an account of the Interview, print- ed Ihe headline, "President Roose- lust of power." German of them In se- clusion and an estimated un- der arrest, tonight fearfully await- ed, their ultimate fate. These were Immediate factors in Ihelr fears and hopes: 1. Funeral tomorrow of a naz! llplomat whose assassination by a young Jew In Paris last week slart- ed Ihe latest wave of anti-Semitic violence and repressive decrees .2. A United States protest on be valf of American Jews following President Roosevelt's denunciation of antl-Jewish "actions. 3. The suspension of normal gov- ernment business today because of he Protestant Day of Atonement "EAR NEW HESTB1CTIONS The Jews believed the government rould use.the funeral of Ernst vom lath as an occasion to Issue fur- her restrictions promised by Field Marshal Goerlng and Propaganda Minister Ooebbels. Some Jews professed lo have re- ceived a what way they id not another spontaneous demonstration" such as last Thursday's might be organ- zed In connection with services for Rath, a secretary of the Ger- man embassy In Paris slain by the 1-year-old Herchel Grynszpan. Von Bath's body was brought to Duesseldorf. his home, today. Chan- See 16, Col. g Methodists Reelect Wright Secretary 400 Turn Out For Conclave Opening MEMPHIS, Nov. The ev. ca) C. Wright, presiding elder the Vernon district, today was i-elcctcd secretary for the eleventh onsccutive sear at the 29th annual orths-est Texas Methodist con- irence. The Rev. W. B. Hicks of Wei- Ington and the Rev. M. B Nor-  nd ihA.T.alorIhy "-cord-breaViny number of Nlmrods roam- eo the cedar breaks of the Central Texas hill country- while other ft? ,'hejr Jn brush South Texas, the timberlands of the eastern portion of the state the p No reports of kills of which the Mason also opened, reached department headquarters, Warden A. R. Williams of Alpine said about 200 black tall deer were taken In his area, the kill being light because the trom drouth' Deports from South it for there but It was anticipated hunting would pick up later T.V, toSA toy kill in Colorado county of Bou'lheist T 4 becn was reported by Warden vyaddeli .who estimated the season's total in that district wuw.run about SCO.: Goliad. arid counties where several years MO the species' wert non-ejlstant. also re- ported encouraging kills. .The department has-been 90RideH-SU Train Section Rex Felker's Trick Horse Goes Along; Cowboy Team To Work Out At El Paso Ninety-odd persons and a horse left Abilene by train last night, that thc "lach" AMene aete gallon would be made Into a separate train at El Paso Riding in the baggage car with the football equipment, band instru- night on ge." Discussed In Advance By WEIRD SIORY OF ABDUCTION, TORTURE TOLD OLYMPIA. Wash., Nov. IS.-W-A weird story of abduction and lonirc-planncd In minute detail werks ihcad, diseased by nearly a dozen persons, and II- "aiid rr'ctl thc nlEhi Ust W', Berry ini three co-defendants -harged with kidnaping and assault ot the physician boast- systematically ar- ,-anred the attack on Irving Baker, lieutenant Dr. Berry accused of ravishing his Robcrt H. Smith, and are namca co-defendants in thc case LM of Wash.. the physician even represented in advance his pretty wile would witness the "honor beating" although apparently she did not Dramatic highlight was thc testimony ol Susanne Baker brunette wife of thc attack victim who tear dimax ot thc forced ,M 'hat Smllh and McAloon had lorced Baker to leave with them alter displaying at McAloon' she MW- held a am5 to'h', w men pinned her arms to rns side, then drove away with him brokc lnto tein to describe j four diff" t wkM S, >stS) Mrs. Baker home tmiwcd. a' m had been d Dr' hart said her husband sta into hk re no "He was covered wkh Se said! tunts as a part of the Cowbo> and's hipper-dippcr programs. This morning at 8 o'clock thc rain is scheduled to arrive In E A two-hour stop will bt nade Ihere, while the Cowboy grid- men workout. Arrival In the west coast city is scheduled at o'clock Fri- day ,u (hal iirac Texans and former Hardln- Simmons studenls in Los An- seles will be hosls for a break- fast lo welcome the group. The cowboy band will high-step through some of the city's main horoughfares intermittently dur- ing Ihe rest of the stay, just to how the Calllornians that some- ne is ir. town. Mora thsr. 2-i hours will be al lowed for sight-seeing before the klckotf at o'clock Saturday afternoon. RETURN SATURDAY Return trip u-iil begin early Sat- urday night. Kith the train arriv- ing In Abilene Monday morning. At least three automobile loads of fans are en route to the coast. One of the firs', parties to leave consisted of six youths riding In a coupe, with three of them in the turtle. There was no rumble scat. Included in this party, which left Tuesday, was Charlie Pond. Har- din-Simmons head yell leader; Tex Allen, Bill Amo. Karl Bormeaux and Vernon Ragsdile, students; ar.d an Abilene youth named Alex- ander, not a student. A car leaving Wednesday con- tained six: L. Wil- son (furnishing jack kins. Armon Beauchamp. Aaron Grant. Raymond Austin and John Singlctary. Several other Hardin-Simmons students waved gcodby to campus mates Wednesday and started west- ward without exactly savin? what the mode of travel was to be. Electrocution Set COLUMBUS. O. Nov. if, _ Ohio's supreme court today set lor Dec. 7 thc electrocution of Anna Marie Hahn, convicted of the poi- son slaying of Jacob Wagner, ased German resident, ot Cincinnati. In what thc state oiled a murdcr-for- profit scheme involving several old men. Abston Wins Third Trial AUSTIN, Nov. (Puny) Abston today was granted a third trial on a charge of murder ol Rebecca Coursey near O'Brien. Kiskeli county, May 6, 1936, be- cause confessions, he asserted were made through fear were used at former trials. In the confessions Abston tudj has been fie-.'Uted for It, At his first trial Abston was given a death verdict. New trial was or- dered and a later confession of- fered as testimony. A 59 year sen- tence resulted. Tht court of criminal appeals fn reversing fcilh sentence cue noted tint it wu ad- roillfd by officers thai one of Ihem suddenly placed shirt around Abston's head and bumped him wilh his knee. Abslon's statement was noled thit he was kept standing for hours without while of- ficen questioned him in relajs; that he finally was unable to sUnd the "torture" and nride i written statement Ir. i'EVirsing the 50-year sentence today the court noted as "signifi- cant'' Abston's statement that from thc time he was arrested until the statement was made nobody ot- fertd to protect him until the trial court told him if he would state the fact.? "he would see that the rangers didn't get hold o! me any- more or something like that." Accord Applies To 40 Per Cent Of World Trade WASHINGTON, Xov. IS- Tha United States and Great Britain drew closer to- gether today by announcing the ccmclnsion of their recip rooal trade agreement, while the United StaUs and Germany drttUd farther apart. AT WHITE HOUSE The state department said Ihe British and hew Canadian trade pacts would be signed at the White House tomorrow afternoon at 1 o'clock. Prime Minister Mackenzie King of Canada will come here for thu signing. Secretary of State Hull, Mr. Xing and probably the British ambassador, Sir Ronald Lindsay, ill speak after the ceremony. The Anglo-American agreement links two countries enjoying forty per cent of the world's trade, makes the 19th agreement conciudei) by Secretary Hull and brings, within trade agreements about 60 'per cent of our total trade. At the same time It has the ef- fect of excluding- Germany further from trade with this country and deepens the abyss between the reich and the United States. CONCESSIONS Officials estimate that tariff concessions are granted, by both sides in the Anglo-American agreement. Sir.ce Germany Is on the United States economic black- list because she discriminates agalnsi American trade, she will not be en- titled to share In the tariff reduc- tions granted Great Britain as oth- er nations enjoying most-favored- nation treatment from thi govern- ment will be able to do. Rumors reached the capital to- day the German ambassador, Hans Dieclthoff, might be ordered back to Berlin by his government as a protest against President Roose- velt's declaration that Germany's treatment of minorities was unbe- lievable in'a 20th century civiliza- tion. These reports were uncon- firmed. It was announced at the Whit" House today that Mr. RoRosevslt's remarks applied to treatment of Catholics in the reich as well as Jews. Youth Hurtles 26 Stories To Deoth BATON ROUGE. La.. Nov. young man fell lo his death today from a parap- of the sky- craper ;apltol building. Assistant District Attorney John 'ridge tentatively Identified the ictim from a note found on thc rushed body as Keith Parham of lew Orleans. Dr. Harry Julinston. coroner. frmetl thc death suicide but sched- uled an Inquest tomorrow morning. Pictures Evidence IK Alegfrax Trio! Niv. 16- Jurors In tLe trfcl of two Atcatraz guard in. an attempt to escape, will view tomorrow a screen show- ing of color plates asscrtedly pic luring the room where the guard Ing, was slain, and the blood-covered hammer used to kill him. warden, said the pictures were tak- en by John H, McFadden. prison superintendent of construction, af- and the convicts on Thomas Limerick made dish for freedom last May 23. their YOUNG STARLET -----j i ivf m j dancer who went to five months from itfncoln, b shown singing after she was slven a.seven-year movie-' contract calling for to J7M. a week. Her first picture'will1 with Bin? Crosby In a dramatization o( the We of Gus Edwards, "The Star-Mak- er." She-will be known profes- sionally as-, Marilyn Kay. (As-( soclated Press'.Photo.) Two Arrested in Poker Shooting Officers Will Bring'Pair To Abilene Today. Two additional suspects' In the October IS holdup shooting of John E- Pllkington have been arrrested and will be brought to Abilene 'today Deputy Sheriff Ruck sibley and Police Captain W. W. West left yesterday afternoon from Houston bearing a warrant for A. C. Bar- ms'. En route home they will stop at Waxahachle to pick up George Brown Knight, who has been In dieted In 42d district court for rob Sery with firearms In connectloi with the case. Barrow, newest figure In the case SAN nUNCISCO. Mw. said that they had state- iclons charged with the murder of ments for various parties throwing A Cliarrt in an afrtomnf _.. _ 6 suspicion on parties. Brown will probably be presecuted as Ib trigger man in Pilklngton's shoot Edward Miner associate prison arden. .sam the ..__i_____. Two others have been Indicted Gtllard Berry Butler fa held In Tay- j mar arraignment ln district court on an son ndtctment charging robbery with firearms. S. R. Simpson, owner of a, uy me DtlH trial, dib, U free under Jjfl Obond afte, arraignment on an Indlctmen: charging him as an accomplice. Body To Be Youth Succumbs lo Complications From Broken Neck Received In Pool Mishap Prank Duncan cloud. IS-year-old Abilene youth, died Wednesday af- ternoon at o'clock in a Fan Worth hospital (ror-. complications developing trom a broken neck re- ceived August 2. 1937 when he slipped from a diving board at the American Legion swimming pool here. The boy's death came is a shock to his parents and Abilene friends. He had undergone an operation In a Waco hosplul --veral weeks azo to remove pressure from the spinal cord, and It appeared success !or Worth hospital Armistice Diy further treatment. Only his mother was al the bed- side when death came. His tithe- R. R. Cloud ot 1218 Sylvan drive' and an older brother. Raymond were In Abilene at the The> went Immediately to going by way of Albany where Mr Cloud's father, Frank Cloud join- ed them. An Elliott Funeral home coach lo Port Worth list night to return the body to Funeral arrrnjtments Proposals For S Radio Speakers And Methodists Denounce Nazis NEW YORK, Nov. 16 The mounting Ameri- can wave of indignation over Germany's anti-semitic cain. paigns today swept in new proposals for resettling Jewish refugees in this country and Africa as well as demands for economic and diplomatic re- prisals against the nari regime. CATHOLICS SPEAK .Meanwhile, six Catholic dljnltar- les on a nation-wide radio broad- cast voiced what their master or ceremonies, the Rev. Maurice hy of Washington, said was ''firm Indignation against the atrocities visited upon the Jews In Germany.'' Other speakers were: Alfred K, Smith, papal chamberlain and former governor of Hew Yorlc; Archbishop John'J. Mitty of 'San Francisco; Bishop Peter L. Ireton ot Richmond, speaking from Balti- more; Bishop Joh'n Mark 'Gannon of Pa., from Cleveland; and Msgr. Joseph Corrlgan, rector ot Catholic university, from ton. More than 100 bishops, minister! and laymen ot the Methodist Epis- copal church, here for the annual meeting of Us'board of for- eign missions, unanimously adoptql a resolution condemning "unspeak- able persecution" in Germany.- rROPOSES MIGRATION Mrs. Mary Rlfa, widow, of Jacob Site, the philanthropist, proposed! .In an open letter to President that an com- mittee lie'' established to flnano mssi-. Immigration or the ehtin GfeMin, Jewish population of 000 9'itn. M. ateraberger, eieciitivi dlrietor of World Peiceways, sug- gested that British areas In South Africa, be. set isida' for refugees and credits for the colonies nlshed by the United States, Prance and the lands. .In support of an. Misting program, approximately sons in New York, which has largest Jewish population of any city In the world, bought tickets for the 5th annual "night of benefit at Madison Square Garden. Proceeds of the benefit, than celebrities will go to the united Palestine ap- peal for ,the settlement la Pales- tine of Jews from Germany, Aus- tria and Poland. Quota, limitations on Jews arriv- ing hei-e were being strictly en- Immigration officials re- ported. Germany has a quota .'of annually and Austria but. only 10 per cent ot .the total may enter each month. While Catholics, Methodists and non-denominational groups con- tinued to scourge Germany tonight, most Jewish leaders In this country maintained silence, fearing further expressions of bitterness might bring greater sutunng to Jews la Germany. Goodnight Buffalo Herd To Be Sold HIGOIJfS, Nov. Buf- falo, the last survivor of the old West, will suffer a fate Ignoble compared to his glorious iwat, 150 head of the famous Goodnight herd are sold at auction here Sat- urday. The herd, composed of old cows, calves, yearlings and two-year-olds, will be sold to buyers for re-sale or butchers for slaughtering for the Chrlitmas trade. Buffalo meat Is sold both locally and In eastern markets during {he Christmas sea- Acrors Wed Today HOLLYWOOD. Nov. or Louis Hayward ar.ci Actress Ida Luplno. promising young members or the screen colony, will be mar- ried tomorrow In Santa Barbara, he bride-to-be's mother. Mrs. Con- nie Luplno. said tor.lsht. Ihe Weafher r d lho TtMPKRATlRES HOIK n, M 1appcarEd fMiwral arrnjements had not ful. Physlclani there predicted he been made last nltht but 
                            

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