Abilene Reporter News, November 5, 1938

Abilene Reporter News

November 05, 1938

View full page Start A Free Trial!

Issue date: Saturday, November 5, 1938

Pages available: 18

Previous edition: Friday, November 4, 1938

Next edition: Sunday, November 6, 1938

NewspaperARCHIVE.com - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions
About Abilene Reporter NewsAbout NewspaperArchive.com

Publication name: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

Pages available: 1,081,878

Years available: 1917 - 1977

Learn more about this publication
  • 2.04+ billion articles and growing everyday!
  • More than 400 years of papers. From 1607 to today!
  • Articles covering 50 U.S.States + 22 other countries
  • Powerful, time saving search features!
Start your membership to the world's largest newspaper archive now!
Start your genealogy search now!
See with your own eyes the newspapers your great-great grandparents held.

View sample pages : Abilene Reporter News, November 05, 1938

All text in the Abilene Reporter News November 5, 1938, Page 1.

Abilene Reporter News (Newspaper) - November 5, 1938, Abilene, Texas • Massachusetts Wins Ruling in Green Estate Tax Case; Texas Stands to Lose $4,685,057 - - See Page WEST TOMI I NEWSPAPER VOL LYU I, NO. 158. tribe Abilene Reporter-Ste f ★★★ ‘WITHOUT. OR VV ITH OFF FN SF. TO frifnhs hr entre \r/ir ci'i.-ifV >    ~ .  ...    IfcTtnlnW WW Frees (ti?) ‘WITHOUT. OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKK J CH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT COES,"-Byron ABILENE, TEXAS,    SATURDAY    EVENING,    NOVEMBER    5,    1938    —EIGHT    PAGES HERE'S HOW STATE TAX DOLLAR GOES, WHERE IT COMES FROM AUSTIN. Nov. 5—(UP)—How the state’s dollar Is sliced for division among public activities was detailed here today by State Comptroller George Sheppard in a table prepared for his official report. Items were: Parks and monuments .........................................im Education ....................................  -me Highways ..............................................J043 Public welfare ..................................................... Eleemosynary    and correctional .............  0595 Relief bonds    ...................................................0230 .regulation of    business ..........................................0189 Conservation . ..................................................... Executive and administration ..................................0142 Protection ..........................  0118 Courts ............................................................ Health ........................................................0069 Legislature ...................................................0010 Miscellaneous    .................................................0030 Total expenditure for government was $157,747,877. A companion table showed 28 revenue sources from which the state dollar was obtained. Such receipts totaled $175,311,069 after deducting Associated Fret* (AP) SURGEON STABBED— PRICE FIVE CENTS Reported Attempt on Greek Kine s Life Proves Fals LONDON, Nov. 5.—(UP)—The The report that an attempt on I basis for the renort th.t u»iu. ..... .    -.....VA    AO mysterious stabbing of a leading London consulting surgeon in fashionable Bond street caused reports today that an attempt had been made to assassinate King George of Greece. At STIN, Nov. 5.— (I    P) — Austin motor    cur driver* compt— d today    from comptroller * report* thai    the;    pay almost    rn third of the    slatr'fc runnlnz    rxpcn- lllahoay nmlor fuel tax makes up 24.08 rents of each state dollar received. • Incenses add another 4.08    rents.    These two    nmke a total    of 28.18 cents    out of each dollar the state collects. Iii    addition the    motorist pH-s    an att valorem    tax on his ant-mobile, a driving license fee and, {indirectly, a part of the state's oil tax In the lubricants for his car. attempt the Greek king’s life had anything to do with the stabbing soon was dissipated, however, by Dr. Sydney G. MacDonald, the victim, and by Scotland yard. An article In the Daily Mail was basis for the report that MacDonald was mistaken for the Greek monarch. MacDonald had Just turned Into Bond street from Piccadilly, Tues-day night, he said, when a man came alongside, muttered incoherently and passed by MacDonald said he felt a sharp blow in his back, and staggered. "As far as I could make out my assailant was short, dark, swarthy, about 25 years old,” MacDonald said. "I found that he had subbed me. His weapon may have been a stiletto. It must have been very sham be cause it made a clean cut through my tweed overcoat, dinner jacket, waistcoat, dress shirt and undershirt and penetrated three-quarters of an inch into my shoulder. It was deflected from the lung. Another inch to the right and I should have been dead.” AS WELL HEADS OIL— The Daily Mail asserted that Mac] Donald bears a striking resembles] to King George of Greece. It said that the king was staying at a ho] tel a few minutes* walk from Bond street and that the assailant plan] ned to kill him as he returned horn* from dinner. Wide Extension Looms at Avoca a tenth of a cent from each dollar for adjustment in tax collectors’ accounts. Pennies and parts of pennies going into the dollar were: Ad valorem tax ..................................................... Inheritance tax ................................................0063 Po11  .... Chain store tax ................................................OI 13 Gross receipts taxes ................................................ Insurance c-'cupation .............................................. Occupation taxes ..............................................#024 C igarette stamp tax ........................................... [9388 Fur tax ............................................................ Fish and oyster tax ............................................0000 Liquor stamp tax ..............................................0210 Wine stamp tax    ................................................0013 Note stamp tax    ................................................0022 Highway motor    fuel    tax ......................................2408 Franchise taxes    and    penalties .................................0086 Insurance maintenance tax ....................................0017 Beer stamp tax ................................................0109 Automobile licenses  .......................................0408 Other licenses .................................................0052 Fees and permits ...............................................0181 Land and leases ...............................................0361 Sale of commodities and properties ........................... .0040 Court costs, fines and settlements .............................0010 Interest and penalties .........................................0295 Miscellaneous county, federal and other aid ....................1459 Teachers’ retirement contributions ..............................0127 Employers' unemployment contributions .......................1127 Stay Liberal, Urges FDR on Election Eve Business Shows Signs of Lining Up, Says Chief Gifts Smashed, House Wrecked- WEDDING PARTY RIOT LEAVES ONE GUEST DEAD STURGIS, Sask, Nov. 3 — (UP) —A riot that broke up a wedding party for John Noroski and his bride left one guest dead and the house practically wrecked today. John Balbiuk, one of the guests, fled from the celebration when the riot was at its height. Five others followed, halted his car and beat him. He w*as stabbed In the stomach. He crawled two miles to his home and died. Two guests started the fight and soon all the men had Joined in, while the women and children fled in panic through doors and win dows. The wedding gifts were destroyed. Cooking utensils containing food were used as bludgeons. William Michaliuk suffered three broken ribs. The Noroskis were married in Windsor, Ont.. and came here to the home of Noroskis parents for th reception. Doomed Slayer •Asked for Eye Imbecile Attacker of Girl Still Fails To Understand He's to Be Executed • CANON CITY, Colo., ov. 5.—(UP)—Friends of a blind lawyer today asked authorities if they could obtain the sound eye of a feeble-minded, condemned murderer. They were advised by a specialist who performed one operation on the lawyer that the concentrated cyanide gas § of the death chamber might ruin the corneas. Apparently there was no way they could get one of the man s eyes—before or after his death—unless he gave permission. It has taken prison officials a year to make him under-^ stand that he must die for a brutal sex slaying. They said he yet doesn t realize that he is to die 13 days hence in the gas chamber. He sits in a screened hospital ward of the state penitentiary, pushes a toy automobile around the floor, or spends HYDE PARK, ov. 5—(AP) —President Roosevelt’s election appeal to the nation’s voters is a call for support of candidates "who are known for their experience and their liberalism.” “We all remember well-knowm examples of what an ill-advised shift from liberal to conservative leadership can do to an incompleted liberal program,” he said in a radio address from his home last night. LINKS UP THREATS Any weakening of the power of a liberal government in the elections. he said, would “resuirect false hopes on the part of some business men. now beginning to change antiquated ideas, that, if they can hold out a little longer, no adaptation change will be necessary.” In his only political speech of the 1938 campaign, the president: Linked “old line tory republicanism” to possible fascist and communistic threats to American democracy: Endorsed the New York state demmocratic ticket; Took a few inferential slaps at the New York republican gubernatorial candidate. Thomas E Dewey; and Praised Gov. Frank Murphy of Michigan for his handling of strikes last year. Murphy, democrat running for reelection against former republican governor, Frank D. Fitzgerald, was the only candidate outside of New I York state who was mentioned by name in the half-hour talk. WAGE CUT ABANDONED— Rail-Labor Meet Monday Seek Proposals For Legislation CHILD WINS DRINK DAMAGE SUIT I hours polishing a tin plate to •see his reflection. The prisoner is Joe Arridv, 23, an ‘‘erotic imbecile” convicted of the ravishing and axe slaving of Dorothy Drain. 15, of Pueblo. Colo after escaping from a home for gfeeb’ -minded. Frank Aguilar, a \VPA worker convicted of aiding Arridy in the crime two years ago was executed last year. A younger sister, also attacked, testified'against bot’’ men. Doctors who examined Arridy said Vie had the mentality of a six-year-old. But he could determine right from wrong, they said, and after several delays, the execution was set for Nov. 18 "He acts like a child,” said £ Warden Roy Best, who has talked for hours with Arridy, trying to make him understand his fate. “We dread more than any duty we’ve ever had the necessity of executing him.” Best believed that Arridy’s inability to comprehend questions put to him would block the suggested operation, even if At'y. Gen. Byron Rogers decided the request was within the law. The eye was vsked for William -Lewis, young republican candidate state legislature from the Den ver district. He was blinded last year when a tear gas bomb he lie; exploded. A Denver surgeon performed one operation, using the cornea oi a womans eye. It was € axially successful but'the surgeon elieved another operation was necessary. H3 said it would be necessary to have the cornea from a living person.    6 Best thought the proposed operation "involved too much % responsibility, even though it was for a worthy purpose.” He did not believe Arridy could be made to understand before Nov. Local Baptists To Convention Fourteen members of the First Baptist church will attend the annual convention of the Texas Baptist association which starts Tuesday at Dallas and lasts until Friday noon. Messengers to the convention with power to vote or the church were elected Wednesday night. They were Dr. M. A Jenkens, J. D. Riddle, Dr. R. N. Richardson, Mrs. M. A. Jared, the Rev. W. A. Nicholas, Mrs. E. O. Keeton. Verna Lee Carson, Mrs. C. M. Caldwell, R. E. Dudley and E. M. Collier. Others who plan to attend are Mmes J. B. Buckley, C. C. Compere. C. B. Ball and Miss Ida Kelley. The Rev. C. A. Powell, pastor of the University BaptJest church, said that messengers would be elected Sunday for his church. Dr. Jenkens is chairman of the plans and policies committee of the association. The committee outlines the year's work for the organization. Dr. Jenkens will speak on women’s work in the church Tuesday night. Riddle will leave early Monday for a meeting of the Baptist Brotherhood which is being held prior to the formal opening of the conven-tio j. «ondition of Rice rid Star Critical HOUSTON. Nov. 5—(UP)—Jack (Red) Vestal of Sherman, injured Rice Institute football player, was reported in a critical condition at a hospital today. "We have not given up hope,” an attending physician said, “but his condition is desperate.” Burial Saturday for Mrs. C. W. Wolsch STAMFORD Nov. 5.-(8pl)-Funeral service for Mrs. C. W. Wolsch. 40, who died yesterday morning from injur.es received when a storm demolished her Sagerton farm home, was to be conducted Saturday afternoon at 2 from St. Paul s Lutheran church, Sagerton The Rev. A. H. Muehlbrad was to officiate and burial was to be In Old Brandenburg cemetery. Old Glory with Kinney Funeral home in charge. Mrs. Wolsch is survived by her husband, one daughter, three' sons Two brothers and six sisters also survive. By The Associated Press Candidates throughout the nation pressed today toward a thunderous climax to the most Intense and vote-rousing off-year election campaign in national history. The great popular interest, reflected in predictions of an unpre-decented ballot total Tuesday, spurred Republicans and Democratic leaders in their efforts to turn the tides of victory in scores of apparently close races. Former President Hoover and National Chairman John Hamilton will speak for the Republicans tonight. Hoovers address to a Spokane, Wash., Republican rally will be broadcast from 8 to 9 p. rn. (Abilene time) over the Mutual network. Hamilton will speak over the "Red” network of NBC from 9 to 9:30 p rn. (Abilene time.) In Washington, the senate campaign expenditures committee warned that its investigators would keep a vigilant watch on the voting in Pennsylvania. New Jersey and North Dakota. Charges and counter-charges have been made by both main parties in these states. Criticism of the adminLstration’s fiscal policies had a prominent place in most Republican broadsides against the New Deal. Alf M Landon, 1936 Republican presidential nominee, told an audience at Mangato, Kansas, last night that adoption of sound fiscal policies by the government would be a step toward substantial economic recovery. Speaking at Dayton, Ohio. Dr. Glenn Frank, chairman of the Nation Republican Program committee, said the New Deal was leading the nation down a "tragic blind alley” of unpaid bills. On the Democratic side. Secretary Ickes told a Philadelphia audience that a return of the Republicans to control of Pennsylvania wounded mean handing the future of the state ovei to Moe Annen-berg, publisher of the Philadelphia Inquirer. Roosevelt Pledges Congressional Aid To New Program WASHINGTON, Nov. 5.-(AP) — Railroad labor and to management, their wage quar-I rel composed and a strike threat dispelled, will confer here Monday on proposals for legislation to rehabilitate the carriers. President Roosevelt grre assurance of his support for an effort to ‘ put through a constructive program cf legislation at the next session of congress.” FDR APPLAUDS Executives of the major roads decided yesterday at Chicago to drop their proposal for a 15 per cent wage cut. Nearly 1,000,000 workers had voted to strike rather than accept it. J. J. Pelley, president of the Association of American Railroads, notified Roosevelt that the action was taken because rail management officials "recognize the gravity of this situation and because they hope that out of it will come, through cooperation of all concerned, a sounder and more equitable policy.” The roads did not abandon wage cut, Pelley told the president. because they agreed with conclusions of the fact-finding board appointed by Roosevelt. After weeks of hearings the board reported that It believed no reduction should be made. After receiving Pelleys message. / Roosevelt declared that “everybody j in the nation is happy that the 1 railroads will withdraw the notices of wage reductions.” Athenians May Open Two-Mile Spread to Field Outpost Hits Pay To Southwest On Town's Outskirts Because the mother of Arlene Richine lost a $5 bet that she could drink a pint of whisky in an hour , the three-year-old child was awarded $2,500 damages by a Chicago Jury. The mother died of acute alcoholism and the girl s father. Victor sued the tavern ow-ners who had bet Mrs. Richine. Father and daughter are shown. STAMFORD, Nov. 5—Heading oil from the Palo Pinto lime at approximately 15-minute intervals, the Ungren A Frezier et a1 No. I J. M. Griffin estate in Jones county today indicated a two mile southwest extension for the prolific Avoca field east of Stamford. No. I Griffin struck oil saturated lime in the basal Canyon early this morning, and drilled approxl mately three feet from 3.247 to 3.250 feet, present total depth. TO LOWER PIPE Operators today had a bull-plug in the hole to stop flows of the well, and were preparing to underream approximately 250 feet for lowering six-inch casing to the top of the saturation. The outpost is half a mile east of the town of Avoca and nearly two miles from nearest production in the Avoca field, northeastern Jones county area discovered in the summer of 1937. Its natural flow was estimated good for 200 to 250 barrels per day. Location is 466 feet from the northwest corner of the south half of section 199-BBB&C survey. The test is a partnership project, contracted by Ungren Si Frazier of Abilene and in which ownership is held by Eason Oil company and Grisso Royalty Company, Enid, Okla., Jon ca & Stasney of Albany and C. W. Byron of Houston. Surrounding and offset acreage is held by Iron Mountain and Humble Oil Ac Refining company, Bert Fields, Lewis Production company and I. J. Allen. In the same general area, prospects were bright for the opening of a new Shackelford county pool about eight miles northeast of the Avoca field and two miles north of the Ivy pool. Fortex Oil Corporation et a1 No. I J. S McKeever, a farmout on acreaage from Forest Development Corporation of Abilene, struck oil saturated Palo Pinto lime — the same Canyon lime pay as that of both the Avoca and Ivy Pools—at 3,240 feet and drilled ten feet of the SPC f inn fr\ rasnt.av    #___  i.    _ ON PROGRAM FRED E. YOUNG * * * Legionnaires To Meet Here Two Divisions' Gathering Due To Assemble 300 Rains Halt Spread Of Forest Flames By Associated Press Forest fires consumed Umber on additional thousands of acres today but rains checked    the    spread of flames in many sections of the nation’s 16-state fire area. Drenching rains    in    the South broke a prolonged drouth and helped control hundreds    of    blazes but permanent relief    depended upon continued precipitation. The damage to timber stands and farm crops was estimated in the hundreds of thousands. The fire area extended 'rom Michigan to the Gulf and from the Atlantic to the Mississippi vatershed. Wealthy Rajah i Seriously III LONDON. Nov. 5—(UP)—The Daily Express reported today that the Maharajah Gaekwar of Baroda, one of the richest nun in the world. was critically ill and unconscious at his palace at Baroda in India The newspaper added that the maharajah was taken ill suddenly 1 three days ago and that two specially chartered airplanes, one bearing the maharajah and her daughter and the other a famous specialist, ; were on the way to Baroda. • • • His highness the Maharajah Gaekwar Sir Sayaji Rao III of    _________ Baroda is 75. He rules over a ter-    w111    **    overland    to    Cad- J. S. Knott, 78, ; Dies in Hospital J. S. Knott, 78, a resident of Abilene since 1919. died at 2 o’clock this morning at Hendrick Memorial hospital. He had been ill several days. Funeral will be held at 2 o’clock Sunday afternoon at Macedonia cemetery, near Caddo, in Stephens county. The Rev. Meles Ray. Baptist minister fiom Weatherford. will officiate Burial, with Kiker-Knight directing, will be beside his wife who died in 1912. The con tin Removed from Throat of Girl British King, Queen To Canada in May LONDON. Nov. 5.—(UP)— Newspapers reported today that King George and Queen Elizabeth would make their Canadian trip approximately between the first week in May and the first week lr June, according to tentative arrangements, and would travel by warship, landing at Quebec. ritory of 8,164 square miles tabling 2.443.007 people. He receives a salute of 21 guns under the British government ratings for maharajahs. His revenues total nearly $10,000,000 a year. He ascended the throne when he was 12 years old. His wealth Is legendary, including gems worth untold millons of dollars. One diamond necklace is worth more than $1,000 000, and a gem-studded crown is valued at $1 200 -OOO A 17-year-old weetwater girl left the Hendrick Memorial hospital >esterdav with only a sore throat after physicians had played hide and seek in her esophagus for two and a half hours searching for a safety pin. Dr. L. F. Grubbs inserted an esophog&scope in the girls throat. From the outside Dr. Donald McDonald directed movements through the flouroscope. After many trials the pin was finally closed and then removed. The girl, Fairy Faye Green. 1103 Hickory street. Sweetwater, said she „_____ w,„, „W_I1 In*    pln ,!n her mouth thunder testimony to and accidentally swallowed It. novel. Alcatras Pair's Trial Recesses SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 5.—<JP) —A 4-day recess began today In the morder trial of two Alcatrhaz prison desperadoes, after the prosecution s first inning which was packed with enough blood and fill a dime do, leaving from Kiker-Knight chapel at 11:30 Sunday morning. Mr. Knott was bom in Bell Buckle. Tenn , July 7. 1860. He came to Texas in 1879, settling near Caddo. where he engaged in stock frrmlng and ran hing until he retired and moved to Abilene. He was a member of tile Baptist church at Caddo. Survivors include nine children: Floyd of Odessa. Ransom. Ida Mac, Nora and Mildred all of Abilene! Mrs. J. A. Little of Abilene Mrs. A. . Johnson of Odessa, James of Amarillo and Aaron of Dallas. section to recover some free oil on bailing. It was reported that oil rose partly in the hole. Six-inch casing will be run in the test to the top of the Palo Pinto section, logged at 3.214 feet, and will be cemented In preparation for treatment with acid. The wildcat is approximately a quarter mile west of the Ungren Sc Frazier No. I McKeever, which indicated a spread to the Ivy pool but was abandoned last summer, and is located 330 feet from the south and 300 feet from the east lines of the northeast quarter of section 15-H&TC survey. Offset holdings and acreage in the block is owned by Forest Development, Fortex, Humble Oil Sc Refining company, Ungren A: Frazier et a1, and the Ambassador Oil corpora-i tion of Fort Worth. I A    one-location    southwest    extension    prospect    for    the Avoca field was    showing    as    Danciger    Oil Si Refineries Inc. No. I C. J. Peterson cemented a string of casing at 3.246 feet atop the Palo Pinto and prepared to core into the pay zone. It is    located    330    feet out    of the northeast come of the south half of the southeast quartrer of tion 195-BBB&C survey. On the north end of the field, Iron Mountain No. 7 Jones Si Stasney completed for a gauged flow of 762 barrels of oil in eight hours and 40 minutes, and the same company skidded rig 990 feet to the south. With an expected attendance OI 300, the annual officers’ conference of the fourth and fifth division of the American Legion in Texas will| convene here Sunday. M. Shaw, past commander of Par-1 ramore post, has arranged a full! day s program for the occasion Post! commanders, vice-commanders, adjutants and service officers from the | two divisions, which include about! half of the state, will be here for! the conference. Vincent Chiodo of Houston, de-1 partment commander of the legion in Texas, will be the days honored| guest and principal speaker. Fred E Young, state adjutant, also will| be prominent in the days sessions. Purpose of the conference is to I train officers of American Legion I posts for better service in the or-1 ganization during the next year. Opening feature of the day win I be attendance of the visiting American Legion officers at the Victory! Mens Bible class at the Paramount theater at 9Jo Sunday morning. A most impressive program has been arranged for thai occasion. After luncheon at Hotel Hilton hie visiting legionnaires will go to i ay lor County Veterans clubhouse for Ute afternoon business session. Besides Chiodo and Young, other legion leaders to attend the conference here include Wynne Goode of Austin, state service officer; Ed Re-dell, fifth division commander; Larry S. Daniel of Abilene, assistant national executive committeeman* Ernest Goens of Tyler and H. H. Dudley of Austin. Hungary Marches Army over River sec- Investigate Blast Aboard Nazi Steamer OAKLAND. Cal., Nov, 5.—(UP)_ Federal agents today investigaated the possibility that the Nazi steamer Vancouver was wrecked by an explosion of munitions she carried. Royal Ambassadors In Called Meeting The C. L. Owens chapter of Royal Ambassadors met Friday night at Temple Baptist church, lith and Sycamore, in a called session. Work for November was planned, a report on Knightly deeds of the past two weeks made and two new members wcie recognized. Aubrey Duncan, Ambassador chief, premed at the meeting. Two members admitted were Richard Ayers and John D. Ayers. By Associated Press Hungarian troops marched across the Danube river today to start octupling another slice of dismembered Czechoslovakia while Japan pressed her economic campaign in China over foreign protests and civil war armies in Spain fought a major battle. Foreign circles in Shanghai reported that the United States, Great Britain and France were preparing new protests against exclusion from the rich Yangtze valley while Japanese merchants were arranging economic monopolies. Japanese, accused by foreigners of attempting to hang a “keep out” sign on China’s open door, insisted that military necessity required the Yangtze to be made virtually a Japanese river. A week’s fighting since the fall of Hankow. Generalissimo Chiang Kai-Shek’s former provisional capital, has seen Japan’s army fan out deeper into Central China. Spanish insurgents, locked all week in a bitter battle with government troops holding the Ebro river salient ii lower Catalonia, reported they had captured two important bridges at Mira vet and Benisanet, just south of Mora de Ebro. Trial of Naxi Spies Will End Next Week NEW YORK, Nov. 5—(UP—The trial of three alleged nazi spies will probably end by next Saturday, attorneys said today. Attorneys for the government expected to rest their case Monday, and the defense may occupy the rest of the week. ;

RealCheck