Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: October 21, 1938 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - October 21, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               WEST TEXAS' MEW5MKR VOL. NO. 143. TO OR WE swi WUR WORLD I fm ON CZECH ABILENE, TEXAS, FRIDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 21, PAGES HungoryWarned Nazis Indicate Hitler to Give Final Decision Czechs Outlaw Red Party and Round Up Jews BERLIN, Oct. (AP) The Hitler government raised the stop sign against Hungary today in a friendly but unmis- takable objection to any hasty partition of what is left of the republic of Czechoslovakia BORDER INCIDENTS Hungary, remnant of the pre-v ar Austro-Hungarinn empire. Is anx- ious to obti.ln some sizeable portions o; Slovakia in (he wake of Ger- many's acquisition .of Sudetenland. Poland, created out of western ItLssia by post-war treaty, is re- ported to went a division of an- other portion of liiithcnta-among herself, Rumania ami Hungary. To all the rumors of Imminent trades which would remake the map of eastern Europe, Germany has replied unofficially that the re- maining mlmvHles quei'lons will be readied In good lime. Moreover, informed nazls have indicated that when that time comes, the decision will rest with Germany and Italy, and will be guided strictly by a determination ol predominant nationalities. While rci >rts cf border troubles Issued from Hungarlan-Slovaklan as well as (rom Sudeten-Bohemian borders, the Czechoslovak govern- ment took action which was regard- ed as an added Index ol a turn to- ward the i Ifllca! right. In Prague the police outlawed the communist party and suspend- ed its newspapers In Bohemia, Mo- ravia and Silesia. Prague also rounded up an un- cstimctcd number of Jews In an cttort to meet the vexing refugee problem. Former residents of the Sudelenlanc by the thousands, flte- inj sectors Into which the German" military marched alter the "peace ol have streamed into Bohemia. Though the Czech general staff and DNB. the official German news agency, said a halt dozen persons had been killed In disorders on the Sudeten Bohemian border, the German administration in the newly-acquired areas prepared to take control from the hands of the military and give H to the civil authorities. The warning to Hungary was contained in Ihe foreign office mouthpiece, Duetsche Diplomatist) Poltttsche Korrcspondenz. Milk Fund Benefit Tickets in Demand Sellers Come Bock for More Bristliest day in several weeks for Ihe Parent-Teacher associa- tion's milk fund was yesterday, ac- cording to a report from sales leaders of the high school group selling tickets for the Booster milk fund benefit show October 27. "It was Ihe best day we've both Jimmy Barlow and Dorothy Jean Shaw agreed. They said 20 more students came to them volun- tarily and asked for tickets to sell. About was turned In by stu- dents that came back lor more All of Die 1.600 tickets prepared have been distributed to high school salesmen. Several blocks of tickets were sent to elementary schools Close to 200 students that are PRICE FIVE CENTS FOURTEEN LIVE AFTER RIDE IN THIS AIRLINER This tail of a big Eastern Airlines transport was all that escaped destruction when the ship came down In flames near Montgomery. Ala. Eleven pas- sengers and three crew mem- bers stepped out ol the burning ship after it had been landed. (Associated Press AS STATEMENT IS Girl Weeps In Spy Trial Rumrich Ended Jenni Hoffman Described as Payoff Agent NEW YORK, Oct. 20-A frighten- ed-eyed German girl. Frauleln Johanna Hoffman, M, al- "payoff" agent of a German ring, wept today as a state read in federal court quoting her as saying she helped steal American military secrets be- cause "I believe I was doing my duty to my Fatherland." If convicted, the red-haired Iraulein and two co-defendants face a maximum sentence cf 20 ,'ears in prison. The statement, described by As- sistant U. s. Attorney Lester C. as a quoted Miss Hoffman as admitting she icted as a courier of purloined U. 3. army and navy secrets to her superiors in Germany. The statement, introduced over protests ol Miss Hoffman's attorney. George c. Di.y. who asserted his client was an "Innocent tool1' and the victim of a quoted, the Dresden-born fpulein as ad- milling she knew the inner work- Ings of the spy plot. ACCOMPLICES NAMED Girl Admits Assault Story is Hoax to Spite Father lor Refusing Her Dates FINDLAY, Ohio, Oct. 18-year-old girl who was found last week in a ditch, her body daubed with obscene words In red paint and who said she had been driven around the countryside for 24 hours, attacked and kept in a pig sty, admitted today that her story was a hoax. was Betty daughter of a beet field worker She told Sherllf Arnold Isch that "I hatched up the whole thing Just to spite my dad for not letting me have a date with my bov friend." The sheriff said that Betty had done good Job of acting The painted words.had'appeared on all her body except her rlght'hand. Betty Is right-handed. Suit Challenges Baird Election Property Owners Refused Bo Hots, Petition Soys BAIRD. Oct. Suit to declare invalid the recent munici- pal bond election here was filed to- day in 42d district court by a citi- zens committee, A few minutes earlier W E. Mar- tin. Abilene attorney, had given utOMPLICES NAMED Mayor H. Schwartz written notice. Naming Karl Schlueter. by law, that the suit defendant, and Guenther Gustav was to be Weather Boosts Fair at Haskell Street Dance and Fiddlers' Contest Attract Throngs HASKELL. Oct. Clouds rolled away a sun supplied warmer temperatures to give the needed Impetus to the Central West Texas lair on Its sec- IN N. M. JURY REPORT- WPA Probers Indict 73 Eastland Files Petition Under Bankruptcy Act Total Indebtedness Outstanding Set At The Citv oi Eastland, through its attorney Prank Sparks, Thursday filed with Ida M. James, United States deputy court clerk, of Abi- lene a petition In municipal bank- ruptcy proceeding under section 81 of chapter nine of the bankruptcy act. The petition set forth that the city of Eastland "Is unable to meet Its debts as they mature and de- sires to effect a plan lor the com- position of its debts." The petition was authorized. U Is stated, by the Eastland board of commissioners of which C. W. Hoff- man is chairman. Members are C B. Wellman. L. J. Lambert, C. T Lucan and H. o. Satlcrwhite. Financial statement or Ihe city as given In the petition showed that In 1937 the total assessed val- uation of property SUW.854. the tax rate per total taxes assessed and total collections Total Indebtedness outstanding was listed at Jl.034.700. with ma- turity dates of bonds and warrants ranging from 1932 to 1965. The gross deficit In the interest and sinking fund account as of Seo- lember 30, 1933 Is listed at 628.55. The petition states that a plan Of composition dated November 19. 1937. as modified September 12. 1938, has been prepared and ex- ecuted by and between the city of Eastland and Glenn M, Dunne of Wichita. Kansas, a principal creditor.. Tne plan of composition as modified has been accepted by the Brown-Cm mmer Investment company and J. V. Abrahams, et al. agents representing creditors of the city, who with Dunne own In excess of 91 percent of Ihe se- curities affected by the plan. In the petition the City of East- land asks that an order be entered fixing the time and place for a hearing for the petition within SO days from the date of said order when and where anv creditor af- fected by the plan of composition as moditled may file fat least ten days prior fo the date of hearing) an answer to the petition, contro- verting any material allegations therein and setting up any ob- jections he may have to the plan of composition. 20 T'-e P'an proposed says the pe- nid an autumn tltlon. will "result Iri a settlement not only of pending litigation but will also provide a method for set- tling and discharging Interest al- Rumrlch sergeant 32, former U. s. army who has confessed ani The suit was brought by T. Powell. Ben L. Russell Sr. C. testified for the government, the Cart and R. E. Hall, all citizens of quoted Missi Baird. Attorneys are Martin and purported confession Hoffman as saying: "Schlueter In my presence ob- tained from Rumrich a signal code, army and navy registers and put it in my the confession other data, and handbag." In another fa Id: part, told" "Schlueter tolcT me Rumrich would be paid S1.000 for the plans ol the U. S. aircraft carriers En- terprise r-nd Yorktoxn." Rumrich has testified he plotted to steal the plans by forging Presi- dent Roosevelt's signature on bogus White House stationery, or- dering the navy department to de- liver the plans to the ring. session marked the end port, several have already re- ported selling tR0 and three dozen tickets. The tickets are SO cents for adults, 25 cents for students, while 103 special reserved scats are be- ing sold lor M.50 each These special scats arc for Abilcnlans wlshinfi to make donations to the fund and sec the show at the same time. Newel Thompson, chairman of the Booster milk fund --cTmittee said last nirht that donations be- ing placed (n the milk fund bot- ties were rapidly becoming numerous and generous. AFTER SURPRISE his arrest Miss Hoffman bitterly reproached him and accused him of being an American spy. Ben L. Cox of Abilene, and Ben L. Russell Sr. of Baird. The petition filed today alleges that 136 persons were refused priv- ilege ol voting In the September 30 election because Ihey had not paid city poll taxes, although they were property owners and had paid property taxes. Question of whether or not city poll taxes are required in such Elections is in dispute in (he courts. The suit was filed on the last day of service for the district court term opening in Baird October 31. The election held September 30 had shown a 200-127 vote In favor of ksuancc of a Jl 60.000 bond is- ipal electric system. ond clay today. A "norther" ham pered first day activities Wednes day. AH Haskell stores closed lor the i p, cipal amount of Indebtedness of the city now outstanding will be substantially reduced, and under which the city may continue its fair this afternoon from 2 o'clock until S o'clock, and the exhibit buildings and carnival attractions divided Interest of spectators dur- ing in the afternoon. Fair officials reported paid admissions to the lair grounds exceeded those for the previous year. Judging of all exhibits had not ready past due and accrued. In- terest that will accrue during the life of this contract, and will also irovlde a means whereby the prin governmental functions and finan- cial relations to the best interest ol all parties." Approval of the plan of com- position as jet forth in the petl- oi an exniDits had not 1.1 ...t been completed Thursday night, ac- I acceptance of the cording to M. P. Vannoy, associa- efrmsMby 60, "nt ln amount ]of hoWer! of (hc outstandinB Methodists Assign Circuit Preachers tlon secretary, due to keen competi- tion in all divisions. Rodeo performance Thursday af- ternoon attracted a much larger at- tendance than on the opening day. but contestants turned In only a mediocre progioi.i because o! wet grounds following hard shoaerj early Thursday morning. An old-fashioned street dance and old liddlers' contest staged on the' east side ol the public square to- night attracted more than 200 COM-'' pies and an estimated 2.000 spec- j off. The Haskell band furnished i orchestra music for "modems" while fiddlers played for old time square dancing. Feature attractions Friday will be! a trench silo demonstration during the morning, afternoon rodeo and a night football game between and warrant indebtedness. Window Soaping Prizes Offered ITASKA. II: Oct. Halloween soapin? of store win- dows is encouraged by mer- chants herewith cash prizes ol- ferfd for most artistic designs. Merchants, resigned to their fate, started the competition. The competing children must sign pledges to commit no other deviltry, said Postmaster George J. Ptaff. sponsor o[ the scheme. SAYING MASS AT CONGRESS The Rev. Nagem of San Antonio Is shown saying miss at the Eucharlstic congress in New Orleans. He was speaking In Aramaic, the language spok- en by Jesus Christ. (Associated Press ENDING LONG Law Scores PILFERfR PEGGED MANDAMUS TO ICC TO REVISE AREA FREIGHT RATES URGED WTCC Traffic Committee Also Asks Rates Be Brought 'Closer Together' of comrrittee, meeting In ni.1 Phrased a strong recommendation to the organization that It champion a legislative mandamus to the Interested commerce commission to relieve the discriminatory freight rate mTddle fa Weft The committee's action Is considered equivalent to the big regional chambers policy even before the board of directors has passed upon it That step is expected to be taken at an early meeting of the board The committee urged that the West Texas chamber of commerce champion an amendment to the Interstate commerce act which amend ment would detinitely instruct the------------------ interstate commerce commission to revise the Intra-terrltorial freight rate structure" It further favored that the amendment instruct that Irelght .........British Round amendment instruct that Irelght rates of various territories be I 1 brought "closer together in I I m bi'ih level and scheme, said level j UU not to exceed a maximum of five I By The A_wodated prcs., not to exceed a maximum ol five I cent as between any of the re- i with intra-terrlto, M structures.- j up A proper administration of this i cupatlon or the old city section of formula should correct our acute j Jerusalem, were herded Into freight rate dilferentiats, should a concentration camp on the site place us on par with other re- of Herod's palace gion-t. while, at the same time, pro- vide "the railroads with their need- ed revenues." the recommendation i continued continued poking into d.Wt recedes _ ot the old city to clean out list ves- The commit ee assorted that 'the tigfs of time has now arrived when there i -n. ihould be a complete overhauling! occupation started at dawn "yesterday after Arab snipers held Scores High in Federal State Politics Billed Conspiracy Counts Returned Against 63 of Defendants ALBUQUERQUE, N. M., Oct. A federal grp.nrf jury today returned indict, meats against 62 persons for conspiracy to violate the fed- eral WPA laws in New Mex- ico, among: them assistant Unit- ed States District Attorney Stanley W. P. Miller and scor- es of men and women of high political place in state and fed- eral government. DISCRIMINATION CHARGED Eleven other indictments, other (han conspiracy, were returned for political dlscrminatlon against WPA labor, diversion of WPA funds' and services and Illegal political activ- ities. Federal Judge Colin Neblett, grim and low-voiced, ordered the) United states Marshal to arrest ths 7.1 defendants and bring them to court Tuesday morning to main bund. The 33 grand jurors, who have labored since Sept. 7 on the state WPA investigation, were or- dered In recess pending call o! tha -ourt. One of the most sensational and sweeping court actions ever to take place In New Mexico's 33 years of statehood, the grand Jury found true bills against, -men and women long associated with governmental matters. i Among them were Milter, who la son-In-ls.w ot U. a. Senator Chavez; Mrs. Anita Tafoya senator's slater; his cousin, Salomon, his nephew, Salamon Taf- Mn. J. A. Werner, wife of Albuquerque postmaster; Martaco Werner, the brother; former itate WPA Administrator FT.JC! G. Healy: Fred Sganzlnl, Head ol the ttate drivers' license bureau; Jot Martinez, secretary to Senator Chavez; Richard Duran, of the de- partment of Internal revenue, and scorn of WPA administrative em- ployes. PENALTIES STIFF The 62 conspiracy carry a maximum penalty of two years imprisonment and TOO fine. The non-conspiracy Indictments carry a maximum penalty of year Imprisonment, and fine. The grand Jury, standing quietly before Judge Neblett, declared la making Its final report that "we do not say all investigations have bsea and recommended that federal agencies take up where ;ury left off. The selfish alms and ambi- tions at Individuals entrusted with tbe admiaistntfon of the WPA unued jour grand the foreman, A. R. Combi of Carlibad, said. "It is apparent that too many persons seeking personal ind political gains have violated legal and moral codes." The Jurors declared that without c.uestloning the alms c: the WPA program, it was clear "that many of those positions of honor and trust have failed In creating and maintaining respect for themselves and the government which they are under oath to represent" The statewide WPA Investigation "vas launched without warning Sep- tember 7, when United States Dis- trict Judge Colin Neblitt instructed the grand jury to consider charges against "certain persons.'' which he said wer-j contained Li affidavits isented to the court. The Ho'.y Land lapsed Into Television is Ready, Sarnoff Announces NEW YOHK, Oct. vision Is ready for home use. David Samoff. president cf the Radio Corporation of America, announced today. He also said his ccmpany was ready to nur'ie; receivers. Other mar-u'actursrs were expected to fellow. He didn't give i defiru'.c date, said setd ar.d prugram service j would be available the cper.- mg ot the Xew York world's fair rexc Apn! 30. i WITHDRAWAL OF PWA AID FOR REBUILDING SCHOOL LEAVES CLYDE UP IN AIR Oct. bv thr locjl sr-ionl _r Staff CLYDE. Oct. 20_Wittidrawal of the public vor'fr, administration Brant of 520.713 for rehabilitation or the Clyde public schools, wreck- ed in the June 10 tornado, left the ntlzpruy wonderinc "what It's all about.'' First Mme irord there was no use to expect s grant; then out of D' me II (no clear sky the application approved, but to the was surprise of __ yone the approval backfTred- to that effect being received Oct. by >hr JOCJI All of which left Clyde just as H was that after tbe calaslropbc without a school building. Classes are be- I fng conducted In the and for the Ifilrd lime In 25 years Ihe town Is without a school building. However, work is (o be started immeoiately on repairing the wreck- ed school. A contract has teen re- awarded G. C. of Ode.wa. The first on advice w Just [our days alter the repair Charles L South and Dtomr i contract of tu.600 was let, the Mihon. the grjrit was turned lown! ji 1r3S Im-1 because "evidently the school dis- i mediately Douglas released the local: trlct hss sufficient lur.ds to rr.s'f school board and members hurried I replacements without aid of the' to Port Worth to explain the situa- i federal government." tlon. However, the application i Thzl ih, off route.' t. local school pat rom' equipped with necessary expUns- tory remarks, only to be rescinded October i Over bitter opposition by Sena-1 they felt no project could be more urgent thin rrplaclnf Ihe Clyde Khool. They had con- tracted for repair work be- ramt Ibfrr apparently nn other alternative. ntficlal, said there a chance for Ihe approval, a, projects okeyed In I9J" had drained the Texas share of the appropriation dry. The pro.'fct receded in Worth Jane 26 and assurance was Siven that wcuM receive rrce over all :-.i the state H to Wjjhingtnn 5. and on 20 word was See SCHOOL, Pj. 19. Cot with the additional' subdivisions l.ave Erown up and have been es- "tabiished under !aas now enacteu and under rules and regulations of Src ft. 10. 5 AUred Plants Texas Flag on Pikes Peak COLORADO SPni.VGS Co'.o Ocs lone SUr f'.as of Texas was planted atop PiXes peafc ifV.ay. Gov James V. AUred ol Tey.r.s jabbed tri? fla; ;r.to a 14.100 fee; above jca level as a wker, ot Texas' claim the Ailrrd "won" the peak from Oov Teller Ammons of Colorado on a Some observers believed the covm- "rv be brought back to nea-- norwaj a mwh if the pace of 'he ".-e-conquest' were main- j talned. Corporation Profits Recover Sharply NEW YORK. .r-Ov- poratirn rcor. ereri sha.-plv from rccr.'sion lows ir, a by m :'r.o period more fivuritlv .v.'r. tf.an riirt which a as hind last vear. Ihe Weather wj KHU-. -if ni: HOT K   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication