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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: October 18, 1938 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - October 18, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               WIST TEXAS7 VOL. LVIil, NO. MO. "WITHOUT. OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR KOES WE SKIi'JU] YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES BEFORE PACKED ABILENE, TEXAS, TUESDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 18, 1938.-TEN PAGES "-Byron PRICE FIVE CENTS Informer Reveals Nazi Spying In U. S. Reich Officials LEADING ACTORS IN SPY DRAMA UNFOLDING IN NEW YORK COURT A widespread and insidious spy ring Is expected to be re- vealed as prosecution of the above accused "small fry" got under way. High German gov- ernment officials, also indicted, are beyond reach, star govern- ment witness is Guenther Gus- tave Rumrich, light, who con- fessed complicity as the trial opened in New York federal court. An army deserter, Rum- rich was caught trying fraudu- lently to obtain passport blanks for use of associates. Erich Glaser, left, air corps private of German origin, is charged with stealing the plans for an army plane, otto Herman Voss, shielding his face, was a me- chanic In the Seversky airplane factory. Judge John C, Knox, shown arriving at Hew York federal court to preside over the spy trial, warned jurors not to be 'prejudiced by speculations, as '.he government's evidence has been kept highly secret. United States Attorney Lamar Hardy, plctureo outside the courtroom where he Is prose- cuting the alleged spies, has conferred with President Roose- velt about the problem of alien prying into U. S. military se- crets. AS INVADERS NEAR GOAL- Japs Warn Neutrals To Leave Hankow County Borrows For Road Fund 'Script Will Be Issued On Two Abilene Banks Taylor county commissioners court Monday voted to borrow 000 from Abilene bank's to supple- ment the road and bridge fund for the remainder of 1938. The money will obtained by issuance of script, to be divided be- tween the two local banks. The ecript will be issued and money bor- rowed in small lots, as needed to carry on work financed by the road and bridge fund. Six per cent Interest will be charged by the banks, accumulative from date of Issuance of any piece of script. County Judge Lee R. York said the loans could be repaid by April 1. 1939. at the latest. Provision was made In the 193D budget to care for deficits occurring in the 1938 budget. The commissioners were meeting In special session, called for pur- pose of arranging for the money. During the day the group drove out highway 36 to inspect two sites where the highway department has asked the Taylor-Callahan counties special road district la buv addi- tional right-of-way. Unnblc to agree with landowners on the price of the additional right-of-way, the court decided to cease negotiations In the matter. It will probably bo taken up with the attorney-general's department by highway department. Voting Starts Today AUSTIN. Oct. (ft The business of voting in (he November genera! election starts in Texas to- morrow when cbEcntce ballots may fce cast. Such balloting will continue un- til Nov. 3. the election bclnz on Nov. a. 'PRETTY' TOPS OFF ESCAPE WITH CAB RIDE NEW YORK. Oct. 17. F "Pretty" did pretty well today. Pretty ran away from the rodeo livestock at Madison Square Garden, was chased policeman, and took complete pos- session of a hardware store for half an hour He ended up the glorious day with a taxlcab ride. Traffic Policeman William Kip-who up to that moment knew nothing about minaing hii business when the proceedings The goat took an Instant dislike to Kip and tried to butt him. Klpp dodged in time but fell down, soveral taxi drivers, whose goats Kip had had lor some time, laughed. Pretty trotted half a block beyond and turn- ea into Frank's Hardware supply company Ig- noring large numbers of Innocent bystanders crowding into protective doorways. Patrolman Kip had arrived by now, all out of breath. With him he brought one of the taxi drivers who had laughed, Alej Bilverman "Now you try getting somebody's or- ocred Kip. And Sllverman did, dropping nsatly from the basement stairs onto the goat and pinning it to the floor. Then. In Silverman's ta.xl the policeman and tne goat rode to a police station where Pretty ivas permitted to gnaw on the bars of a cell un- til the S. P. C. A. wagon orrtved. Plan Motorcade Group Leaves Wednesday For Haskell's Fair PRAGUE. The Boosters club and the cham- Czechoslovakia's ber of commerce will cooperate in sponsoring a motorcade of Abilen- Czechs Report Border Attack Thousands Arrested As Martial Law Is Invoked To Quell Hungarian Terrorism :t. along most of the length of frontier with Hungary- were under martial law to- sm pending resumption of territorial negotiations Hungarian army officers and according to Czechoslovak arrested on charges ing day of the Central West Texas tag net? KraTuv Open "3ht' The bulletin asserted Hungarian soldiers opened fire there on Czechoslovak troops on patrol and threw grenades across the border it saia the Czechoslovaks obeyed orders not to reply to attacks, Officials said martial law was j imposed especially in a determina- tion to prevent a chaotic situation which might offer Hungary a rea- son for military occupation of the ians to Haskell Wednesday, open- fair there. In a meeting iajst night, the Boost- er club named c. W. Moss, Dem Waddington and Jack Simmons members of committee io arrange for the trip. The group will leave at 10 o'clock] Wednesday morning, and will con-1] gregate on the outskirts cf Haskel! I to parade into town. The chamber of commerce will regions she demanded. Official circles still were without L-umiLLfci oi COmmerCC Will .jt.it provide for transportation of the I oft'cial information on when nego- Abllene Christian college band with Hungary, which the the event, Merle Graver, sccretary- manager. sski last night. Those interested in making the I trip have been asked to contact a I member of the committee, or to call either the Booster club office or the chamber of commerce office. Nancy Grissom has been selected as Abllene's duchess in the queen- crowning extravaganza. latter broke off at Komarom last Thursday, would be renewed. Roii Cat BEAUMONT. Oct. JV-The Texas state federation of Labor convention today voted unanimous- lv ti support an> effort to resist wage reductions for railroad work- ers. WITH ALDERMAN IN Radio Singer's Ex-Mate Arraigned In Shooting LOS ANT.FT.F.q i- LOS ANGELES, Oct. After a day cf charges and counter- charges lopped olr by a complicated marital tangle. Martin iMoe) Sny- rier. Bm.irimr and Chicago fig- ure, was arraigned today for the shcoiirijs of Myrl Alderman. 30- year-old at !hc home of Rulh radio finger, Saturday nijht. After the shootinr. Alderman and MUs sjlrl were srrrellr married in Tij-jana. Mexico, four months ajo but Inquiry there (ndjv did not rtis- a rrccrti fif the ceremony. in a hospiiaf.r- infar tously but not dangerously wound- ed by one of four Both Miss Etting and Snycler's daughter Edith Snytier. figured in the shooting against her father. About tho time of Smder's ar- raignment late today. Alderman's former wife. Alma Alderman sued MLM E-tini! for jl50.000 damages, alienated Alderman's affections last winter. She divorced him Dec. 2. but the tierrre does cerorr.o final ;mlil Dec. 2 Alderman charged Miss Ett- ing won Alderman away from her Oct. 24. I937. nearly three years after Alderman ami Mrs. Alma Alderman were married at Tijuana Snyder was arraigned on charges of kidnaping and attempting to murder Alderman and of carrying a pistol without serial numbers lachrrl. His ban was reduced from S20.000 to 410.000 and preliminary hearing was set. for Oct. II. Just outsld> Alderman's hos- pital room lorlar. Miss Eltinjr. nho ran for her pistol .Snvrtrr Atrirrman. 1 would gladly have Catholic Priests, Official Arrested VIENNA. Oct. Cath- olic priests and one official of Theodore Cardinal Innltzer's bur- I eau, who is not a priest, have been arrested. It was learned tonight. It was believed the arrests were in connection with publication last week of an anonymous leaflet which was circulated to give a full report of the an'l-church demon- stration at Saint Stephen's palace j when Cardinal innitzer was wound- ed by a stone thrown through the j window of his palace. Nothing published in the I Vienna newspapers concerning the disorders until several days after. Groups of nazii smashed windows in the second district tonight when the Jewish feast of the tabernacle was ended and Jews leaving their prayer houses were insulted. Nazi quarters retried that per- mits of Catholic bishops to Inspect religious classes In elementary schools probably would be with- drawn throughout Austria. Green Invites CIO Rank And File Back Chinese Stop Canton Drive British Prepare To Subdue Arab Holy Land Rebels By The Associated Press The Par East and the Near East dominated the international scene Monday with undeclared war gain- Ing force In Ihe former and virtual civil war stalking in the latter. In. the far eastern conflict, in- dications Japanese were preparing to close in on Hankow were seen In a warning by the invaders to ves- sels ot neutral powers to move up the Yangtze from the Chinese mili- tary capital. Japanese reports of sweeping gains in their three-way drive on Hankow were offset somewhat by advices from the south that 100- 000 well-equipped chines: fighters had halted the invasion toward Canton, South China's chief metro- polis. Palestine in the Near East wit- nessed zero hour preparations for a concerned campaign by 20.000 Brit- ish troops and police to subdue 10 000 Arab insurgents spreading death and terror In the Holy Land. The British drive touched off a burst of terrorism among insurgent snipers and bomb throwers who added to the estimated 800 dead counted in the past 12 weeks of Ihe Jewish-Arab feud. SOLUTION SIGHTED Hungary and Czechoslovakia were believed nearer return to the con- ference table in their Interrupted negotiations on Hungary's demands Tor cessions of territory where macyars live. Budapest heard Adolf Hitler had promised to support Hungary's de- mands provided she grants increased national cultural rights ;o some WO.OOO Germans within her borders. Hungary continued military pre- parations In case of a turn for the worse. Premier Brla Imredl, taking ccgnlzancc of the restlessness, call- ed upon the nation to maintain discipline. Are Named As Plot Directors 'Soldiers Mode Life Tough' Says 'AWOL' Defendant NEW YORK, Oct, Guentber Gus- tav Rumrich, 32, confessed spy and U. 8. army deserter, began hia wavering-voiced story in federal court today of how the jibes of "soldiers who made life pretty tough for me" led him into complicity in a spy plot in this country. ROLD COUNTRY OUT The witness saw he sold oul his country after reading a book or spies written by Col. Walter Nicolai famous head of German espionage during-the world war. He went "A.W.O.L." from his army post on Governor's island, he said "because my English was very bad and the soldiers were very prejud- iced against me." Rumrich took the stand after United States Attorney Lamar Hardy, white-haired former Missls- slppian, bluntly charged "high offi- cials of the German war ministry' with directing an espionage plot that included attempted forgery o: President Roosevelt's signature on White House letter paper, a thwarted plot to murder u. 8 army fort commander and the theft f vital American defense secrets. Before a packed courtroom, Hardy told the jury of io men and two women that the plot operated for three years. The government, he said, would prove that the three defendants on trial worked as paid agents of naz Intelligence officials, ferreting out confidential Information on the army, navy and air force 'for the advantage of Germany." He said "damaging admissions' had been wrung from Pauleln Johanna Hoffman, 26 tltian-halred former beauty 'salon assistant on the North German Lloyd Liner Europe ana alleged pay-cfi agent .of the ring at the time of her arrest last spring. BEAUTY LISTENS Miss Hofmann listened stoically, See TEIAL, Tg. 10, CoL 6 Germans Arrested For Canal Spying CRISTOBAL, C. Z., Oct. Germans, one of them a 19- year-old girt secretary, were Jailed today in default of S15.0QO bail each on a charge of photographing fortifications in the vital Canal zone in violation of the United States espionage act. Arrested yesterday at Pott Ran- dolph, which defends the Atlantic entrance to the Panama canal the quartet was arraigned today before Judge E. I. P. Tateiman in magis- trate's court ordered held for a preliminary hearing Thursday. Pictures taken by the four Ger- mans, It learned, showed posi- tions of anti-alrcvraft batteries at Port aRndolph and the big disap- pearing long-range guns at Caleta Point, overlooking Cristobal break- water. United States District Attorney J. J. McOuigan, to whom the case was turned over by Military au- thorities, said the men suspects had served in the German army nr navy and were well-versed, in'mlli- tary tactics. Rains Cool Texas As Heat Hits East By The Associated Press A record-breaking fall heat wave put the eastern half of the nation baci on a summtt weather stand- ard yesterday. A 30-year-old high temperature marlt for the date was shattered in New York City when the thermo- i meter ascended to the 87-degree level. I Rains in parf.5 of Texas were the i only reports of precipitation in the area. No heat was reported i in Texas. i KEY WITNESS Called a "woman of mystery" an reported to be a member of a once wealthy family of the old German regime, Miss Senta De Wanger, above, h expected to give valuable testimony for the federal government in its trial of lour alleged Nazi spies In New York. Miss De Wanger owned a liquor store near the army flying field at Hempstead, L. I., and postponed a visit to her home in Germany to testify at the trial. Milk Fund Show Tickets On Sale Students Launch Canvass Today; Features Told Canvass of the town by repre- sentatives of the Abilene high school students association with general admission tickets for the stage revue for the benefit of the PTA Milk Fund will begin today. The revue, sponsored by the Abi- lene Booster club. Is to be presented Thursday evening October 27, at fair park auditorium. General admission for adults will be 50 cents; for tcbool children 25 cents. Later, members of the Boos- ter club expect to call on down- town business men with reserv- ed seat tickets, priced at These will be for tie center section at the front of the home. Principal features of the revue were revealed yesterday. Jimmy Wroten of the talent committee an- nounced Dr. Clinton E. Adams, president ot the Lions club, will be master of ceremonies. Among features will be: Buddy Martin's dance studio ad- vanced pupils: m a I5-minute se- ries of numbers: Dick Sherwood and Rupert Phillips, vaudeville act; the Shaw Sisters, Hugh Price Fellows. McMurry' college dramatic arts professor. In Imper- sonations; Charlie Pond of Hard- in-Simmons southern AAU tumbling champion, in com- edy tumbling. At intermission time the "B 
                            

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