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Abilene Reporter News: Saturday, October 15, 1938 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - October 15, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               WEST TEXAS' OWM MEWSMKR VOL. LVIII, NO. 137. "WITHOUT. OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH TOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS If (UP) _ABILENE, TEXAS, SATURDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 15, 1938. PAGES PROPHET QUEIN Jwo SuSDeds WITH FOREIGN CRISIS FRESH IN OFFICIALS' MINDS- r TT n TM mjr i Miss Laura Hale Rand, deb- utante. Is shown attcr her coronation as Queen of Love and Beauty at the 59lh annual Veiled Prophet ball in St. Louis. (Associated Press Reich, Catholic Cardinal 'Morally Assert Officials In Vienna VIENNA, Oct. mtnl officials said tonight nazi dif- ferences with the Catholic church In Austria "probably are over for some time to come." They said the party considered that Theodore Cardinal Innilzer, archbishop of Vienna, had been "morally executed" by the speech last ntght of Austrian Nazi Com- missioner Joseph Buercitel and by t rising tide of what they called "public indignation over a clergy that dabbles In politics." (L'Osservatorc Romano, Vallcan City newspaper, accused German authorities of delending the nazi rioters who attached Cardinal In- nitzer's palace Saturday ntght. It asserted the attack was "The poisoned fruit ot daily unpunished, encouraged champions of anti- Catholic accusations and vitupera- "Inniteer will not dare to strike back now." an authorized spokes- man declared, and then predicted E "new reformation" In Austria which he said would take thousands from the Catholic church. He sertcd many doubtles.5 would join the Protestant church. Buerckel in his speech last night declared: "Politics Is our exclusive right. Theirs (the clergy's) is ex- tlusively religion." The Wciner Neuester Nachrich- ten tonight said: "The efcnts of the last few coubhters that God has blessed the fuehrer's policy and the German people. MX The last few weeks have filled our nation with a new laith in God." Attempted Attacks Spur Slayer Hunt LASOtlMONT. N. Y, Oct. WV-Two new attempted attacks on woman Intensified today the search for the man who slew n-year-old Mary Imelda Coyle Monday night Police at nearby Mamaroneck received a report from Christine RoSlnshaw. 21. that a nude man had jumped from r. car near her. a sister and a friend late Tuesday night, but had become frightened end fed. A 24-year-old domestic, Hannah Moynihan. told police she was frightened by a man who tried to crag her Into his automobile. Hore-Befisha Urges Arms Output Boost LONDON'. Oct. Sec- retary Leslie Hore-Belisha broad- tail an appeal to Britain's arma- ment workers tonight "Io evceed anticipations" In their part rf the nation's vast rearmament program. The waf minister outlined a new scheme by which industrial work- ers bstween the ases of 33 and 50 would drop their tools and operate anti-aircraft guns to protect' their in raiders planS at broke through general defenses. Face Charges In Hotel Holdup Hold Auto Owner As Accomplice In Case; Pair Hunted Two men were In Taylor county jail last nlsht, under charges con- nectlni; them with the shooting of John E. Pilkington In a note! room holdup Wednesday. Oillard Berry Butler of Houston faced complaints charging assaull to murder, robbery with ilrearms and automobile theft. Examining trial was postponed until Monday on motion of the state, with But- ler placed under bonds totaling 16.500. S. R. Simpson of Houston, own- er of the automobile In which Butler was arrested in Port Worth lour hours alter the shooting, was charged Friday afternoon before Justice of Ihe Peace Theo Ash as an accomplice In the case. Simpson was taken Into custody by Dallas officers when he came to the police station to report "theft" of his car Wednesday night. BUTLER IDENTIFIED TK-o other men are being sought by peace officers throughout the state. Sheriff Sid McAdams said last night that three men who were In the hotel room at, the time of the holdup had Identified Butler as one of the two coming to the room. Attendants at Hendrick: Memorial hospital last night reported that Pllkington was resting well. Hunter Gets Aid In Fight For Shutdowns J. C. Hunter, president o! the West Central Texas Oil and Gas association, said today aid of the North Texas and Panhandle Inde- pendent operators' associations had been enlisted In the fight for con- tinuation of statewide Saturday snd Sunday oil production shut- downs. Representalives of the three or- ganizations will present their ar- guments to the state railroad com- mission at the monthly proration hearing tomorrow at Austin. School Pupils Attend Dawson Fair Big Spring Sends Delegation, Band LAMESA. Oct. M school day at Dawson county fair and over 3.000 school children were in attendance to make today's crowd a record for the fair. Final Judging of the agricultural exhibits will be held Saturday morning. Premiums on community boolhs will not be declared until points on general agricultural ex- hibits are announced. The livestock exhibit vis the outstanding section o( the fair this year and the new livestock building proved inade- quate to accomodate the large entries. Big Spring brought a dele- gation of about 100 people, includ- ing the high school band, to the fair this afternoon. Lubbock was also represented with good delega- tion. FDR Calls Attention To U. S. 'Generosity' WASHINGTON. Oct. It- _ President Roosevelt told the Amer- ican people tonight they always had been generous and that he had complete confidence they would prove so again in the community chest drives to be undertaken shortly throughout the land. Speaking by radio from the Whltr House, he said he .was not making an appeal or speech for the 1938 mobilization for human needs but wub vjidp.uc Ans teat-ration was merely calling attention "to nual convention today. the past and present generosity of the people of America.' Endurance Fliers At 65-Hour Mark RICHMOND. Ind.. Oct Bob McDaniels and Russ Morris young Richmond filers seeking a new unofficial endurance record for light airplanes, reported lonight "all Is weir as they soared over Indiana and Idaho. Another refueling contact rk midnight over Vanalia. Ohio. PRICE FIVE CENTS U. S. Plans Modernizing Of Defenses Oct. the feileral government, with recent crisis fresh in their minds, worked to- night oti n tremendous, four-fold program to slrenglhfii and modernize national defense metliods, President Koosevelt informed his press con- ference today that defenses were, being com- pletely re-examined in the light of tions. his aides made known that they were discussing these four points: 1. Larger appropriations for the army. 2. Largtr appropriations for the navy. 3. New techniques, especially mass pro- duction of airplanej, now proceeding on a large scale abroad. 4. Methods of stimulating a billion dol- lars worth of osnstruction work by private utilities, for the purpose of assuring power to vital manufacturing centers in war- time, and for spurring economic recovery immediately. Jf the ileins in the vast program receive final presidential approval they will gn before con- gress early next year, it was indicated, .Mean- time, the president is delaying his budget esti- mates for the coming fiscal year to see how much I fie drastically revamped defense pro- gram will c-ost. The primary aim of Die utility construction would he to link power lines together so that, if the power in one city proved insufficient, electricity from another could be "imported." Attention is on l.i prmcipal manu- TarliirJDK centers in tlie Kast, South and Mid- dle West. Economically, (he is designed to stimulate employment in Die heavy industries. President Roosevelt already is army and navy proposals to step up military expenditures some 25 per cent beyond the ap- proximately made available for the 12 months beginning-July J, IMS. The navy wants two more battleships, a score of lesser warships, funds to modernize five battleships and tvv.o aircraft carriers, and to develop more shore, bases. The army has prepared estimates calling for a heavier output of planes and munitions and closer gearing of industry to national defense through "educational" orders to private inanu- facturers. President Roosevelt made it clear the defense resurvey was at least hastened by Europe's recent crisis. He said the had been in progress for a year, but was forced to a head by events of recent weeks and technical information reaching the ad- ministration in that time. He declined to say whether the new pro- gram involved increasing the size of the army. ilr. .Roosevelt's announcement evoked by reporters' questions about his conferences with Bernard Ban.cli, world war head of the war industries board, who recently returned from Kcirope. The Xew Yorw financier, pictur- ing the ambitions (V'ermanv. Japan and flair as likely to lead, particularly jn Soiifh ica, to a clash with the I'nitf-d States for trade and prestige, advised that the, nation lonk In its. defenses. REBUFFED ON CZECH TERRITORIAL CLAIMS- Hungary' Colls More Troops To Colors Cabinet Decides Rites For Blast Two Succumb To Injuries In Well Explosion COLEMAN, Oct. Fu- neral for one of two men wno died of Injuries sustained In an oil well blast near Santa Anna Thursday afternoon wll be held here Satur- day. for John Sandera Simp- son, local oil operator, will be held at the home of C. D. Currle tomor- row afternoon. Other arrangements were Incomplete tonight. Puntral for John Knox Jr., Mid- land employe of an oil wel' acidiz- ing firm, will be held at his former home town of Bastland. Time and other details were not announced. Simpson and Knox died hospital at Santa Anna this mom- Ing at H-.55 a. m. 8 o'clock, respectively. W. P. lacy. 30, working with Knox. received i broken leg and was burned, but hosplUl attendants expect him to recover. Jimmy Bur- rage. Ranger, was not seriously In- jured. Two other men at the well. Alex Clark of Coleman and Roy Haynes of Santa Anna, were uninjured. Bulgaria Rounds Up Revolt 'Higher lips' SOFIA, Bulgaria. Oct. Hilllary police conducted roundups throughout Bulgaria today In a search for "higher ups" responsible for a revolutionary plot that failed. An estimated arrests were made but many were released upon establishing adequate Identification. The tip-oft to the abortive revolt :ame with the assassination Mon- day of Major General Yordan Pejeff. Woodul Governor For 21st Time AUSTIN, Oct. the twenty-first time, Walter P. Woodul ul of Houston was acting as gov- ernor of Texas today. The began substituting for Gov. Jamej V. Ail- red when the latter crossed the stale line en routes to Denver. Colo.. Io attend a convention of the Christian church. Graphic Arts Ass'n Selects Abilenian DALLAS. Oct. D. Evans, of Porlh Worth, was president of the Texas iraphlc Arts tednation at the an- PHOOEY, PHOOEY ALONG THE PARK PICKET LINE Irked by a playground rule which prohibited 'boys of 13 or older from a section reserved for girls, these boys .took: up duty as pickets in front of the section In San Francisco. Jane Hoel (right) shows her disdain lor the pickets. (Associated Press AS U.S. OPENS TRIAL- Nazi Spy Turns Informer Jury Picked To LANDING OF SECOND JAP ARMY ON SOUTH 5INO COAST LOOMS Casualties In Air Raid On Waichow Estimated At City In Flames Hear Testimony Ring's 'Contact Man' Changes Plea To Guilty NEW YORK, Oct. An unexpected plea of guilty by a for- mer United States army sergeant accused o! espionage provided the federal government with a new and Important witness .today as it opened its trial of two other men and a woman, charged with sell- ing military secrets to a foreign power. After Federal Judge John c. Knox mounted the bench to direct selection of a jury, Ouenther Gus- tav Rumrich, 32. Chicago-born son ot Austrian parents, announced vt pdicLita, amiuuuceu O.ner officers were George through his attorney. Paul G. Rell- llliuugd E. H. Anderson. Abilene, vice-presl- i that he dent, and J. H. Cassidy, Dllla-s, previous pie Storm Diminishes JACKSONVILLE, Fla.. Oct. weather bureau said at 3 p. m.. eastern standard time today i tropical storm in Ihe southeast- ern Gull of Mexicc ''has diminished n intensity and remains about .Utlonary ns miles west north- vest of Key West with the highest Jinds now only S5 to 40 miles an lour.'1 CORONER'S VERDICT DUE GUARD AI FABULOUS GOLD MINE SHOOTS SELF wished to change his, of innocent to guilty, j ing said Rumricli, whose f blundering attempt to obtain pass- j port blanks originally led to dis- covery of the spy ring, would tes- tify tor the government HONGKONG. Oct. second large-scale landing of Jap- anese troops on the South China coast appeared Imminent tonight while much of Kwangtuny province was engulfed In a maelstrom of misery, destruction and death. Japan's army of inva- sion stabbed deeper Into the pro- vince. Hundreds of thousands ot civilians were in flight. Japanese air squadrons delivered heavy aeri- al punishment and guns thundered olf the eastern tip of the province. Air raid casua'ties at Waichow alone were estimated at That city was reported in flames. Flank- ing the westward advance from Bias bay. where the invaders land- ed Wednesday, Waichow was the immediate objective. The force befoie Waichow appar- ently was Intending to strike ,.tu A Jury of ten men and two wo-itl0rlh and Ihen 'or an assault I ese men was picked to hear the Canton itself or Its communica- timony. which Ihe govcrnnwnt will! llons from lhe north. begin presenting Monday. It was reported from Swatow Q> Rumrichs change of plea nio-ithat 10 transports, rlOHS mentarlly diverted attention pa tolard Bla3 or 'he lone woman defendant. Jo- the Pfarl nvcr Delta to llnd hanna ijenniet Hermann. 26. pret- Clthcr ty former beauty shop attendant. If a landing in force were made, the Csnton-Kowloon railway would be caught in the jaws of a vise. The railway Is a lifeline for both Chin- ese armies and Hongkong, British crown colony. Warplanes droned over Canton, render of the metropolis by Satur- day at the threat of "complete and thorough bombinc." There started a mass exodus of an estimated 400.000 women and chil- dren. Authorities sought establish- ment of non-combatant safety zones and archives were being sent to Yungyuen In northern Kwang tung. Government officials were expected to leu.'e soon. Eighty Americans and more than 100 other foreigners remained In Shameen and the United stares Gunboat Mindanao, one French and five British gunboats were bot- tled up Jn the river port by Chin- prepj rations. On Mobilization Order To Bring Total Troops In Field To BUDAPEST, Oct. Hungarian government tonight ordered mobilization of five army classes totalling ap- proximately men after failnre to obtain from Czecho- slovakia satufaction of Hun- gary's territorial claims. DECREE TODAT It was understood the mobiliza- tion, to be decreed formally by the war minister tomorrow. would bring to the- number of Hungarian troops under arms in the border crisis intensified by the breakdown of direct negotiations between the two nations. Announcement decision was made after a cabinet meeting tonight. Reinforcements of troops in bor- der regions was ordered M Hun- gary got reports from emissaries sent to Relchhfuehrer Hitler and SUN FAILS, SO PAPER GIVES EDITION AWAY ST. PETERSBURG, Fla Oct. 14 St. Petersburg Independent gave avay a. complete edi- tion today for the second successive day. The Inde- pendent is distributed free of charge on. every day the sun fails to shine here. To- day was the 10th sunless day in 128 years. Hughes Quits City Tax Post G. P. Holland AppeTfTfedTo Fid Vacancy of Esrl Hughes. Ui- of the city of Abilene for more than five was presented to the city commis- sion yesterday, to become effective! November 1. In a letter to the mayor commissioners, Hughes stated he waj accepting a better position. Following acceptance of his resfg. nation by the commission Mayor WtU Hair's nomination of G. P. Premier Mussolini seeking support of Hungary's territorial claims against Czechoslovakia. Earlier, diplomatic circles had reported molbllzation hid been postponed at the request ot "great foreign powers'1 especially Ger- many. Fuehrer Expected To Settle Dispute By The Associated Press. MUNICH, Oct. pos- sibility that Hungary and Czecho- slovakia would settle their territor- ial dispute aided only by the me- diation ot Adolf Hitler was seen tonight after representatives of the two nations had presented their causes to the reichsfuehrtf. At the same time Field Marshal Herman Wllhelm Goertag's news- paper called on Czechoslovakia for quick, concrete evidence that she would follow up a pledge conveyed to Hitler today that she would as- sume "a loyal attitude toward Germany." The newspaper declared -ten- dencies of a nature hostile to Ger- are useless must be eliminated." On the Hungarian-Czechoslovak minority dispute, nazi circles said Germany considered herself so close and friendly to Hungary and EARL HUGHES so well linked up today with Czechoslovakia that Hitler's medi- i to fill the vacancy' was ap- ation was regarded as sufficient. I Holland has been engaged Hitler conferred here first with I for more tnari a year a special FYantbeic Chvalkovsk. Czechoslovak foreign minister, and then with Koloman Darani. Ian premier. former Hungar- Agency Pioneer Druggist Of Brady Is Dead BR.ADY. Oct. P Jones 72, pioneer Brady druggist, died at 1'is home today. He had been re- tired for about 20 years. The Brady Masonic will be collector cf delinquent taxes. Hughes' new position Is with the West Texas Utilities company, he said. He has been !n the tax business for 13 years, having as a deputy in the county collector's of- fice in 1920. For six years, tnrte terms, he wis county collector. On May I. 1933. he was appointed city tax assessor-collector by C. L. John- son, then mayor. He served the four years of the Johnson administra- tion, and was again renamed when WASHINGTON. Oct. ..-P- The wage-hour administration se The ex-sergeant who deserted his j pov. at Missoula. Mont, had been! accused by U. S Attorney Umar Hardy ot serving rhiff "con- Uc: man' in this country [or a The Weather John N. Bicr.ani Mid loday he had determined that the bullet wound fata, to W. F. -Pat) Moore. guard at the fabulous 'Lost San Saba" gold mir.c which leger.d says con- tains 120.000.000 in gold bullion, was selfinfllctcd. Whether it was an accidental death, he said, he had not deter- mined. Justice or the Peace Wallace Law I he would re turn a coroner's (he lonely ran about; they believed a storehouse his heart, witnesses said, j pottedly 40 yard.' through He dtitcned a Four persons, three of thorn guards, saw Moore's c. O'QuInrn former Texas ranger now in charge of the mln'; Mrs. O'QuInn; special Deputy sheriff Alex H. Harias o! Bexar county, and Steve Splara. foreman of the in thfl rrntury- Lhe bullion re- the cave bv Ihe in the Spaniards or Indlaru. Blgham averted hosevcr. he not Informed of (he nature of the Intend says the mine opened In the flftwnth or sixteenth cen hy three hiah n'.! '.he German war ministry. The German officials in- dined with 13 others. this xi'n country's extradition treaty Sl German did not authorize their A. M. being brought back. r- T un-liv n workers and from pro- visions of the wase-hour which beeomf.i effective October 24 The act authorises Elmer E An- drews. to prn- o' tl'.f'e crouds a- 'han the statutory 2.) cenr.s an th.it in charge of services tomorrow. j Hair came into the mayor's office. ON COMMITTEE Wheeler Contends Carriers Coald Save Million Daily By Elimination Of 'Waste' Oct H- fact Itn board testimony forf.iv co'i'.d MVC a million IAIS a rl.iy by elimiiiA'm? "indf irrR an KOVK tury by Spaniards, and that it was dent [operated [or 350 vears The Green To Capitol HOUSTON. Oct. H from hls tenl the Mexican ROV- hid lhe mine Green of th? Amen- I nlcht he planned to Irave Houston Sunday morning to return to ington. '.r} I lUlfl todlf, KIR r lt.f. f banit'r don f.Ke Senator Wheeler iD Mor.tV msr'iiei. chairman o( a jer.ate comnnf.ee :-i'.; Investigating railroad te that in view ot such iifccl the roads were not jusutieci in asking rail.-Md labor to weep; a AMARILLO. Oct. IS per cenl wi8e reduction. He s a_unit. members of the Pan- 
                            

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