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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: October 13, 1938 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - October 13, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               WKSTJEXAS' HEmnTpER VOL. LVIil, NO. 135. Abilene Reporter- WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKE'icM YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS AS IT ATTEMPTING TO EVADE HIJACKERS- ABILENE. TEXAS, THURSDAY MORN ING, OCTOBER 13, 1938, -FOURTEEN PAGES PRICE FIVE CENTS Abilene Business Man Shot In Hotel Room Holduo ENGINEERING'S GIFT TO CITY OF TOMOR ROW_ SUPER-HIGHWAY SYSTEM CUTTING THROUGH SKYSCRAPERS ENVISIONED BY TRAFFIC EXPERT CHICAGO. Oct. for street traffic research said rnr fh. _..... CHICAGO. Oct. Engineering's girt to the me- tropolis of tomorrow was pictur- ed today as a system or super- ot elevat- ed, and many or them driven through buildings to reduce the number of supporting struc- tures on busy streets. Dr. Miller McClintock, direc- tor or Yale university's bureau of motorists and make it dif- ficult for drivers to go wrong if obliged to do some emergency thinking. Dr. McOlinlock. in .Chicago for the national safety council's sliver Jubilee, explained that the principles of automatic traf- fic underlying the super-high- way plan evolved from studies begun several years ago and completely supported since as to accuracy and propriety of construction. An engineering term for that kind of thoroughfare Is "limited way." The highway is divided, has no access Irom abuttingr properly, no grade crossings and Its efficiency and safety are heightened by segregation of relatively slow and fast traf- fic. "Our belief." the Yale expert said, "is that all American cities of anv xlze must provide for the major movements of RAGING OUT OF Inferno Threatening 'Oil Village' Blast Of Tank Sets Off Fire (raffle by routes of that kind. The cost will be less than it has been for the minor and abora- tlve types of changes that have been made, notably the futile widening of streets. "There actually Is nothing fantastic about these principles of construction We are apply- ing exactly the same principles as those governing railroad op- erations, which have an almost 100 per cent safety record." The laying of a superimposed grid of routes would entail a collateral development of ade- quate terminal facilities. Dr. McOlintock said Existing city streets, he wenl on, would in the future be used primarily as feeder routes. SPOTTING 'ENEMY' PLANES IN U. S. WAR GAMES Army anll-slrcraft crews on the alert as they attempted to spot "enemy' planes in tensive war games at Fort Bragg, N. C. Observers looked tor planes coming In from the to attackJhe fort and gun- nergs prepared to defend it, in this Instance with a three-Inch anti-aircraft gun, partially con- cealed in a hastily constructed log Preu Photo.) Name Taylor FSA Clients Nine Approved By County And District Officials Names of nine Taylor county farmers who have been approved by the farm security administration as recipients of loans to buy places under the farm tenantry program were revealed Welnesday. They are O. T. Adams, Gulon .star route: Jesse L. Davis, Gulon star route: John C. Grain Trent route 1: Wondle D. Hopkins. Abl- Itne route 3: Edwin E. King, Tye route 1; George C. Stewart, Abi- lene route 3; w. O. Dawson. Abi- lene route 5; Iris Touchstone, Tus- cola route 1: and Eugene Downing, Abilene route 2. farmers were fir.iliy ap- proved at a meeting with the coun- ty committee for approval or the applicants and county and district ofiiclals or FSA Wednesday. Each will locate a farm which he wants to purchase. These will be approved by the committee and an appraiser Irom the Dallas FoA of- lice. Clarence Symcs. Taylor county FSA supervisor, said Vie expected farms could be bjught by January 1, allowing moving In for the 1933 crop year. Sheriff Killed By Suspected Robbers NOW AT A, Oct. Two suspected highway robbers shol and killed Hugh Owen, 48- year-old county shrrifl as he attempted to arrest them at a farm ten miics cast of here this aitemoou. The siispeclj. who fled through a tack door ana escaped in an auto- mobile, had brcn traced to ihe farm hourc by Sheriff Owen. Bill I-upfer and highway patrolman Roy Kannady, w.io were Invesllgat- Inc J> robbery here last night. A posse was formed quickly and Rn acarm broadcast askln? ps- iicc in nearby points be on the lookout for the pair. Forest Fires Begin To Spread Rapidly By The Associated Press Fires which had been temporari- ly in check, after taking a toll of 20 lives In Monday's widespread conflagration, were spreading ra- pidly late Wednesday nljht In the International Falls. Minn., and Fort Ont.. areas. Fire lighting forces along the Minnesota Ontario international bolder redoubled efforts as less fl- vorable n-catiirr conditions accel- erated Dreading of flames. North Carolina Area To Be 'Blacked Out' Today In Biggest U. 5. Air Defense Test FORT BRAGG. N. C. Oct. 12.......m-An area of 8.000 square miles in eastern North Carolina will be "blocked out" tomorrow night In what U. S. army officers describe as the biggest air defense test of its kind ever staged in America. At the first word of warning from the civilian observers, every llgnt on the Fort Bragg army reservation and scores of nearby towns and cities with an estimated population of SoO.OflO will b? snuffed So far in the gigantic war games here the amateur physicians, lawyers, coast guardsmen and the worked with deadly efficiency and accuracy in spotting the "enemy planes" flying from Langley field, Va., to attack Ft. Bragg. Nazis Express Ire At 'Methods' Of Cardinal Shift In Wind Spreads Flames To Sinclair Farm LINDEN, s. j., Oct. 12 (AP) An eight-acre inferno of naming oil 'and bursting tanks raged out of control to- night as firemen and volunteers toiled to keep the fire from enveloping one of nation's largest oil centers. 15 TANKS BURN Flames burst 300 feet in the air from 15 burning tanks In the cities Service company's "OH Village" where the fire was touched off by an explosion of a. tank today. A half-dozen more explosions fol- lowed, shaking buildings over a wide area. Lakes of water spouted from scor- es of hnsellnes to keep the fire from spreading to the company's huge oil distillery across the railroad tracks. As far as could be ascertained, no one was trapped In the blaze. A brief and sudden Ihlft in the wind tonight blew names into the adjoining "Unk farm" of the Sinclair Oil company where a pipe house and oil stnrajf house were consumed. Btjond the Sinclair lies the massive plant ot the Standard Oil company, fire officials for i lime feared a (eneral conflagration until the wind shifted again. The flames flared suddenly again when the nth Cities Sen-ice tank buckled in the heat and spewed fuel oil into the flaming iake DAMAGE Unofficial estimates of damage already done ran from upwards. Trucks and fire apparatus sped from storage depots many miles away, bringing fresh supplies. There were numerous injuries among fire fighters, but only three were hurt seriously enough to be recorded by physicians. The cause of the Initial explosion 'I HIT THAT PRETTY FACE' "Boy. I hit Mm with every- thing I had." said Elinore Troy as she showed her itjter Ruth Just how she did It. Einore. former Hollrirooct ac- tress and "bubble was talklnj how she biffed Jack Doyle, prize-fighting Romeo, sometimes called the "Irtih Thrush." in a New Yorlt club. She said he failed to keep a date with sociated Press AFL Rejects Solon Censure Report Construed As Attack On New Deal Returned To Executive Council or movement current government activities affecting the of thSee was undetermined. crM of :My defended the committee the present adminls- tiation." but his motion to adopt was forgotten in the brief but ex- citing deba'e that followed. VIENNA. Oct. sermon last Friday and'Now Seamen warned tonight "an end must be the subsequent storming of his I JCamen WOH Baths The warning was published in the windows, much Interior damage wound to the cardinal from e carna rom a thrown stone, and the injury otone nail organ. Wiener Neueste Nach- thrown stone ai Tichten under the signature ot the'- of the cannons >-'erday jiawvawas dinal for a remark there still are youns people who "are not so easi- ly templed to listen '.o deceitful catch words and hypocritical rhetoric." Neuesre iVac.Vicriten's attack said. "We are going on our way even the consent of the Find Coat, Beret Of Attack Victim e consent of te last adherent of Austrian clericalism who has not found his way over in the.'e new times. 'We co no' intend, however, to LARCHKO.VT. N. Y. Oct. 12.- coat and beret which n year-old Mary Coyle WOK un 'r.e last night of today by the the clues sney nopcd would I lead to the man who ravished and j Cardinal Mlct! her- I editorial was nn: liic only Near the bloCKi-covpre.l "-1''' displeasure. picked up in the shrubbery along j The lan of the Kirchliclie the pathway leading frnm I Wandzeliune. a diocpse p-jblication WASHINGTON. Oct. 12 Recognizing the "existing inclina-1 (ion of mankind toward nakedness and Idleness." the navy announced i today that It is all right for sea- men to take sun baths. Trunks were designated as the official uni- form for such baths. "Neither nakedness nor underwear are authorized navy outer uniforms at present." said a ruling drifted by Rear Admiral G. J. Rowcllff. commander of cruisers, scouting force. Un-American Quir Back To Capital DETROIT. Oct. 12. Instead of approving the report as they had previous reports manding the revision of the r.ev; deals Wagner act and wage-hour law. the delegates voted unani- mously to sertd the report back to the executive council "for further arj ooyie WOK un '.r.e >ve do not intend, however, to of her life were found i permit ourselves to be conlmuoui- he police and added to ly In a state of ancpr. An end must rhich they hoped would i be put to the methods of the Hcrr man who ravished and i Cardinal, x x x __ house Dies committee, which open-'' f ed an investigation of un-American TO purs majority must '.can pconle The controversial document was offered an analysis of present day Iremis and tenden- cies in the development of jtor- frnmrnt philosophy to extend the domain of the slate. It railed for a "halt" on for- ernment encroachment on wlf Jtovernmenl and self-action In the labo- movement and added: "We must fay that it should be !ion of Labor were "clearly illegal." clear to every American that Ihe The board filer! a brief in the philosophy which is being developed ir action, by which ever-increasing domain Is giv n tn the slate, expressive of the philosophy anii AFL Contracts Labeled'Illegal' Labor Board Files Brief in Supreme Court WASHINGTON. Oct. The National Labor relations board told the supreme court today that contracts between the Consolidated Edison company or New York and affiliates of the American Federa- One Suspect Is Picked Up At Fort Worth J. E. Pilkington Given Fair Chance To Recover; Slug Rips Through Body John E. PiUrinfton, prominent in Abilene business and civic circles was seriously wounded yesterday afternoon about 3-30 o dock m an Abilene hotel when he was shot in the back by one j of two holdup men. when he attempted to evade the hi- jackers by sUppmg into an adjoining room. One of the men fol- owed, jammed a gun in his back and fired. The slug ripped throughi tn, body diagonally from the left side of his ticket above the kidney. Attending physicians late last night ac. corded him i fair chance of re- covery. CAE TALLIES About four hours after the hold- up. Port Worth officers piclted up car fitting description of that in which the two gur.men and ac- complice fled. They took into cus- tody the driver, believed one of the two who raided the poker game. Officer! there Immediately started to Abilene with their prUoner and were being met to Caddo by three Abilene otficen, Chief of Police T. A. Hacicney, Deputy sheriff Elmer Lowe and R. T. Redles. Abilene fingerprint e.ipert Trace of the other two men had not been found late last night. PlUctagton was shot after two men walked into the unlocked room on the fourth floor of the hotel (Hil- Five or sli Abilene men were playing poker In the loom, one of the group told a reporter. The man arrested 'in Port Worth, officers said U an ex-con- vict, who served a two-year term ior assault to murder. Thj car he was driving when arresteS was a 1938 Oldsmobile sedan, license numbers 615-039. S. R. Simpson of Houston, who he was owner of the automobile, reported Ita low to police ute right, He said he had parked the car on n Dallas street at 1ft o'clock Tuesday i-.isht. with keys In the lock Witnesses to the shooting gave officers detailed descriptiona of the two gunmen. One, they said, was a short, heavy-set man, weighing 180 to 175 pounds, with dark hair brown eyes and ot dark complex- ion. The other was Uller and of slender type. He. they said, shot PUldngton. GRAB MONET IN SIGHT Immediately after the shooting the two men grabbed up all money in sight, about 1135, and fled. They were seen to leave the hotel by a rear exit. The getaway car, with third man waiting at the wheel parked between the Hughes Motor company building and the hotel. The driver headed the car out north Walnut, and according to officers, sped to the Albany high- way, turned south on the dirt road that divides the A.C.C. campus, and athletic field. The turned east before speeding reaching the g e Texas Pacific, right-of-way was not seen again. A group of Colorado citizens met a racing Oldsmobile east of Ranger little mare than an hour after the holdup. The car was making at least 90 miles per hour, the Colo- radoans reported to Abilene police and tn Deputy Sheriff Clarence Nordyke of Balrd. who talked to them briefly as they passed through See HOLDirp. pr. n, Col. 5 Fon Woring Not New Soys Solly f (i n LAO j- itrtuuis ironi ncr n UHA. houseboat home to the Boston Postj delayed on fril'.eti. road, detectives discovered a crank i churches, was seized tonight. handle that might have been u.sed' No rMson uas given for the con- locations. The cardinals residence catholic churches were still under guard by pDlice .ir.c! .'.orm troopers. Anne Lindbergh's Book Out Today SEW YORK, Oft 12- Washington. Chairman Martin CVes iD-Teil said the hearing here would be arf- journrd to permit thf committee to open an investljatlon or sit-down strikes fit the capital Monday. that course. The e But the Amer- rr. be forced, bv See AFL. Pf. II. Col. t case in which the utility and the; International Brotherhood of Elec-! tricai Workers seek to invalidate a labor board order abrogating the brotherhood's contracts. Th- A p. of tiled a brief ye.s-( 'prday attacking the order ard sav- ing that labor board "has braz- enly ar.d by official act declared It-: self as a proponent of the CIO." I The bosrd s ordpr was ixMied in November. 1337. aftrr the CIO brought charges ot unfair tabor practices. CHICAGO. Oct. Rand, who's gone a lot farther with a bunch of feathers than an ostrich ever did, motored Into Chicago today with a Pekingese dog. her dimpled smile and an answer for the rival fan dancer who U .mirier, her. "I'll bet Cleopatra waved fan a long time sally said. She had no takers. "And I was fanning long be- fore the Chicago Cubs got good at it." shj followed through. Silly professed to know little about the star. Of Faith Bacon [or MTj.ooo on the grounds Sally sto'.e the fin dance idea from her. County In Need Of Road Funds Commfssioners Call Session To Debate Problem Money will be the topic of worry when Taylor county commissioners' court meets in special session Mon- day morninp. The court faces the necessity of supplementing the 1938 road and bridge fund, already depleted and It is likely that a resolution to bor- row J8.000 or will be ap- proved at the meeting. Whatever Is borrowed will he for a short time only. The 1919 budget provides for the erasure ot the 1938 deficit in this fund. As soon as tax payments start moving, the loan will re repaid. More money is necessary. Judge Lee H. York has pointed out. not only to maintain roadc but to match federal grants for WPA. projects. For this reason, the prob- lem is half one of relief, half of road-maintenance. the meeting the commissioners will also discuss furnishing the new two-story county agricultural build- ing. Reconstructed from materials In the old county Jail, the new of- fice building Is ncaring completion. Bottom floor of the new build- ing will be turned over to county farm and home agents and their staffs. Top Boor will be given to same of the other state and fed- eral agencies for which the county must furnish housing. Storm Warnings Go Up On Gulf Coast NSW 9RLE.VNS. Oct. The New Orleans weather bureau, charting the course of a tropicll dis- turbance of moderate intensity tn the Gulf of Mexico, ordered north- east storm warning disptovrd to- night from Port Arthur, Tex, to "arrabelle. Fl.i. The bureau said the disturbance, at 6 p. m. iCST) was central stout 290 miles south of New Orleans moving northward about miJes hour and might curve to north, northeast, or irci alter. It i- v.ended by st.-rn? di  er "N'orth to The Orient" which machines langlpd on a curve at thp of J r fairgrounds and crashed A. I.tnSb-r'h s-irr rVvJ'r through a guardra.L Watfr, w.no.' The Weather I INTERPRETATIVE BULLETIN WAGE-HOUR CHIEF PLANNING 'WIDES1APPLICA1ION' OF LAW WAHHINtiTON (Vt _' Ml R WASHINGTON. F. A Uon' of ihf labor "ThL u........it TTiU summary of the "The admlinsrrawr in interpret-! by the oftlce o! his gen- ing the statute for the p-.irpoje counsel: .performing his administrative duties. I-The act requires worier, en- should properly lean toward a broad gafecl in commerce or in production .interpretation of the key roods for commerce to paid m commerce or in the pro- a minimum wage of 25 cents an Rnod-i Mr SIP hour beslnning Oct 24 But it "be- said in first Internrvatiie hulV- romfs an ir.riivid'.lal matter J< to the tin on twonirs ef- nature of the employment of the Oct particular employe.' category of included in act applies r ......._ ly but n.r to employefs days :fmo-.-.i'. of jocciit, in the telephone, telegraph, radio be p.-.-m.i ihil .ar.d transportation industries ard In th; %-orVer :n jwarehoiisfs the storage ficlittfei of ticn of 50005. ire inea in interstate distri-j subject to the actjre i ballon of gvxxis. J entitled to rs benefits whether they 3--Thesecond category applies.for.perform ilirir a: home, in example, to workers in manufactar-' factory, or elsewhere, ing. processing or distributing p'.snLv ac: not llr.-.it.-d to em- a part of whose gcods moves out of .ployes sorting en WIM the state where the plant loaded VVorsers rr.ti.'t be paid it t'-e t-Thf act proof that a of not less than a'ceritj hour in a place, the first yen.-.   

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