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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: October 12, 1938 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - October 12, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               WISTHXAS' NEWSPAPER VOL. LVII I, NO. 134. Abilene Reporter- "WITHOUT, OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKtt'JUJ YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT ABILENE, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 12, PAGES" Allred Inviles Anyone Else To Write AUSTIN, Oct. James V. Allred gasped when he opened his mall today and read: "Governor take our off the pension roll. We are able lo lake care tl ourself. BenUmln Clarion, Mertlldr Clay- Ion, Leah Thompson, Gentle Cos." The letter was mailed frcm Cedar Creek. Bastrop county. He sent It to the old age assistance olllce. adding laughingly that else who wanted Ihelr names withdrawn should write him. PRICE FIVE CENTS Negro Charged In Slayings Of Women SAN ANTONIO. Oct. 11-W-CUfUm Wheeler. 32-year-old negro was charged with murder today in connection with the mysterious slay-' Ings or two women wlileh officers have attempted to link with the sui- cide of Joe D. Ball, tavern keeper, of Ba" lRMiv woman and that her body was burled near Ingleslde. dismembered boriv tigaiinj; Balls death. Hazel Brown was an employe at the tavern. Riders Of Electrocuted Horses Escape Use Caution On Wage Law, Bosses Told AMARH.LO, Oct. story of a freak accident In which two WACO, IA', Texas emdovm t k riders escaped death when their horses were electrocuted was tola here eaultauiv th.ir .t 'Wroach today by M. c. Hancock and W. B. Harris both of Hereford cautiously their administration of the new federal wage-hour law today. Hancock and Harris were horseback riding on Harris1 place near' Smethurst of the National Association of Manufacturers told .u... tne Texas Manufacturers' association employers should first get coc an arrs were orseac ring on Harris1 place near Hereford. Approaching a pool of water, they decided to ride through t Instead nl around As the front feel of (he horses went !nto the water h .v n.-> nit; jiuui. icti uie liursej went :nto oest icgai neip oota.nable In order >f the water hoih animals fell and both riders were thrown clear, falling yet not clearly defined In all its phases t fin me hrcMp fhp twit ._______j- i_ .L. PLACING FATE IN HANDS OF FEDERATION MEMBERSHIP- Jon the ground farsMe thp pooi Both horses were the best legal help sbta.'nable In order not to Jail afoul of the law ns vet not. elearlv Hpfinivi in oil ue His remarks were made in the course of a round-table discussion on labor problems convention delegates posed. Green To Resign Is 'Fraud' O'Daniel Shies At U.S. Farm Program Fight Tells Farmers He'll Stick With State Problems CORSJCANA. Oct. eommltal on the AAA-domestic al- lotment farm conflict now racing In Texas. Governor-Nominee W- Lee O'Danle! today told a meeting ot dirt farmers he would have nothing to say with reference to federal legislation. After asserting he wanted to know only what the state government could do that would be beneficial to agriculture he went down into the rodeo arena where he had spoken and scuffed his cowboy boots in the dust with, overalled farmers who told him their troubles. G. E. Lawson, Ellis county far- mer, told him 85 per cent of the farmers In that county were for Sec- retary of Agriculture Wallace the AAA plan. Another told him the farmers wanted a graduated tax in Texas under which the man with 2.000 acres would pay a higher rate than the man with 200 acres. A farm wife told him to take care of his health while governor. He listened to all. and asked few O'Daniel appeared on the same proaram with J. E. McDonald, state agricultural commissioner, who took the occasion sponsored by the farmers union renew his attack on the AAA. McDonald again explained the domestic, allotment plan he Is ad- vocating, under which farmers wouM be allowed their share, of the domestic market with a subsidy to assure a parity price, and then use their own Judgment In regard to how much they would raise for pos- sible foreign consumption. Not on the program, but in the crowd and passing out literature, was Alexander Boynton of San An- tonio, republican nominee tor gov- ernor and O'Danlel's opponent in the genera] election in November. The literature vis a mimeographed sheet containing a six-point attack on ODanlel's candidacy. "I didn't come here lo tell you farmers, how to O'Daniel said. "I shall have nothing to say with reference to federal legislation. We have problems big enough in Texas to take all of our time, j want to know what Ihe state government can do that will be beneficial to Texas farmers. Select Nine Taylor FSA Clients Today Tentative Choices Meet With Group Final selection of nine Taylor county tenant farmers who will be gh-en government loans for par- chase of farms will be made today. The county committee for selec- tion o[ the tenants will meet with Robert Fisher, district rural super- visor for the Farm Security admin- istration: Lent Taylor, district home supervisor; Clarence Symes. county rural supervisor: and Gladys Wright, county home supervisor. Members of the committee are D T. Pctree ot View, chairman. J. P. Keith of Caps ana H. R. Clemmer oi Elmdale. Tlie nine tentatively approved ap- plicants will meet with the group along with their families. Final np- proral is expected in the meeting. Find Skeleton Near Motley Courthouse MATADOR. Oct. It-OV-A skele- ton. the skull of which was fractur- ed. was found beneath six inches of DENOUNCES LINDY Vastly Molokofr civil aviation chief, with 10 Soviet air heroes, called Charles A. Llnd- berg a "stupid liar, a lackey and a flatterer of German Fascists" and accused him of spreading lies about Russia's air strength after his visit to Mos- cow. (Associated Press story on Page Textile Group Tackles Wage Union Leader Asks 40 Cents For Minimum WASHINGTON, Oct. Members of a 21-man textile com- mittee tackled today the task of establishing minimum viges for textile workers under the new wage-hour law. The first step was to classify the Industry in 15 branches. Then It was decided to invite employers and la- bor to report the possible effects of establishing various wage minima. from 30 to 40 cents, in the branches. Emil Rieve. of the textile workers organizing committee, said before the meeting that he would ask for a 40-cent minimum wage, effective Immediately. But cerlain other com- mittee members said their task would take them three or four months. The wage-hour law. which goes into effect Oct. 24, provides for a 25-cent wage minimum anl B max- imum work week of 44 hours In in- dustries In interstate commerce. However, Ihe textile committee, first to be appointed under the act. Is under Instructions to recommend the highest minimum wage, above 25 cents, which it believes can be paid without cutting employment. Donald M. Nelson, chairman of the committee, estimated It would be January or February before the committee could recommend a wage above 25 cents. AFL Attacks Order Of Labor Board WASHINGTON. Oct. American Federation of Labor told the supreme court today the Na- tional Labor Relations board "has brazenly and by official act declar- ed itself as a proponent of the CIO." This statement was made In a brief filed with the tribunal attack- ing validity ot a labor board order directing the Consolidated Edison company of New Vork to abrogate a collective bargaining agreement with a federation affiliate. The court will hear oral argument on the case late this week. >e- Recall Boosted BURGOS. Spain. Oct. II m oin. uivtitu D u opain. f foil within a block of the Motley The insurgents announced officially rounty courthouse toway by work-1 today that 12.000 Italian volunteers mm excavating for the foundation troulrf be repatriated .vx-.i instead of a building. lot the 10.000 previously estimated Negro Attacks Couple, Beats Man To Death Womari Crawls Quarter Of Mile To Main Road RUSTON. La., Oct. Sherirt Bryan Thlgpen said a young man and woman parked in an automobile on a side road three miles east o! here were attacked tonight by a negro who beat the man to death and seriously Injured his companion. The sheriff said the young wo- man, suffering from head wounds inflicted by a club, crawled a quar- ter of a mile to the main highway end stopped a motorist who took her to a hospital here. Sheriff Tnigpen and night Mar- shal Hal Posey sped to the scene and found the young man dead, his face and head beaten, and one arm smashed as Ihough he had used it in an attempt to shield himslef. The couple was not Immediately identified. Feeling was reported high in the section, where a similar attack oc- curred Sept. 13. On that date a negro attacked j. W. Breedlove and lib compjnlon. a Louisiana Tech co-ed, at a spot two miles rrom where tonight's attack occurred. Breedlove was beaten with a club and suffered a fracture skull. The li still unsolved. Physicians at the Huston hospi- tal said the woman, about 20 years old. suffered a severe gash In her scalp. She was reported to be a waitress of Jonesboro. La. Sheriff Thigpen. aided by depu- ties and state police, threw a cor- don of men around the scene and awaited the arrival of bloodhounds. Publishers Protest Barring Of Briton NEW YORK, Oct. Strachey. British author end lec- turer barred from the United States, received sympathetic at- tention of a group of American book publishers today. Twenty-one officials ot book pub- lishing houses wired Secretary of State Hull and Secretary of Labor Perkins: "As publishers, we vigorously pro- test cancelling John Strachey's vfca. The preservation of American democratic tradition depends on the LOSERS IN MEMBERSHIP LOCAL LEGIONAIRES FETE SWEETWATER BUDDIES WITH FEED Buddies they and budldes they are-members of American Legion posts of Sweet water and Abilene. They live a scant 42 miles apart. One gang .suppuris a football team known as the Mustangs. Another is equally as strong for an outfit going under the name of Eagles. But they were buddies end test; at the Taylor county veterans club- night Abilene off an honest debt to the Sweetwater post. The two posts engaged In membership contest. house last night Larry S. Daniel, division five com- mander, presided over the Informal get together. Daniel called on the present commanders of the two the Oscar McDonald post were posts, M. Shaw, Abilene, and Ernest guests of Parramore post at a feed I Odor, Sweetwater. for talks. Other friendly Sweetwater won and as a result 21 members of speakers were Dr. John Majors, L. N. (Ople) Oeldert, w. E. Smith, L. A. Eberle and Arnold Dresler. all former commanders of the Sweet- water post; and Ruck Sibley, Jesse Warren, past commanders ot the See LEGION, Tt. 12, Col. 6 TO CUT LAST SEABOARD Japanese Launch Canton Attack freedom of the people to hear any survey point of view. We ask that this--------- View Extension Well Is Gauged Taylor Outpost Flows 94 Barrels On 12-Hour Test A. R. Porster and Charter Oil Gas company No. 2 J. C. Frederick- son, extension well of the Taylor county View field 12 miles south- west of Abilene and the opener of a new lime pay horizon, came up to expected production on its first test reported yesterday. The well flowed 94 barrels of oil in 12 hours through two-inch tubing. Before the gauge, the well had headed at the rate of six lo 70 bar- rels hourly through open casing. Production Is from the upper Cook lime, found at 2J32-80 feet, total depth, and acidized with l.OCO gal- lons. It is Jocatcd 960 feet from the south and 300 feet from the east Jines of the Frederlckson 198-acre tract In subdivisions 17 and 18. Guadalupe county school land sur- vey No. 120. Humble Oil Refining company- No. 1 Chittenden, second well for the new Swastika sand pool in wes- tern Jones county, was reported to have swabbed 44 barrels of oil In seven hours on initial testing, but will delay for a week an official potential run. It is producing from sand at 3.010-22 feet. In southern Haskell county. Saw- yer Drilling company No. 1 A. J. Rowland estate, wildcat north of ihe Ivy pool, was shut down yesterday at 3.2o9 feet, total depth, in the top of the strawn series alter the Palo Pinto section had failed to show oil in coring. It Is in section ENGINEER CASEY JONES HONORED The widow and son of "Casey" Jones, engineer Immortalized by song and story, inspect the mark- er to his memory dedicated at Cayce, Ky.. 38 years after the wreck of the "Cannon Ball." In which he was killed. (Associated Press visa be restored immediately." Panhandle Receives Additional Rainfall AlfARILLO. Ocf. Addi- tional moisture for the western part of the panhandle was reported to- night, adding materially lo the op- timUtic outlook for plains ranges and the 1939 wheat prospects. While heavy clouds hung over mast of the showers were reported only along the western fringe, including Far-Jin supporrt of all democratic can- well and Adrian in Texas and didates. conservative or liberal FDR Free To Back Non-Demo Liberals WASHINGTON. Oct. 11. _ _ President Roosevelt apparently kept his "hands free today to support non-democratic liberals for public office If he considers such steps advisable. At his press conference, he re- frained from taking the same stand as democratic, chairman James A. Parley, who recently Informed re- Charge Ibex Youth In Cattle Rustling Probe ALBANY. Oct. catlle theft, complaint naming Bob Compton. 18. of the Ibex community. 10 miles southeast, was filed here to- day by ShacXeltord County Attor- ney Thomas L. Blanton Jr. Compton is one o! the three men held by county officers since last week as suspects in a cattle rustling racket. Sheriff John 1 held pending further investiga- tion, according to the sheriff. Meanwhile ranchmen continue identification of cattle In two herds being held by Shackelford county officer.! east of here. T. W. Lee of Albany has claimed 33 head of cattle from the herds, and Henry "-----of Albany has recovered 13 Albert Atorm of Moran and Key Rail Point Falls To Japs Papal Nuncio To Reich Takes Up Cardinal Attack By The AvoeUled Preu Japanese began their long- heralded attack on Canton in south China today to cut China's last Im- portant link with the seaboard, and simultaneously announced the cap- ture of a key city on the Pelplng- Hankows connection with Sian and her source of supply trom So- viet Russia. A joint Japanese army and announcement in Shanghai said i landing had "some where In South China" and i Hongkong dispatch quoted reliable Chinese sources as saying a land- ing, after a heavy bombardment had been effected it Hachung, in Bias bay, about SO miles from (he lallway connecting canton with Hongkong. At the same time the Japanese news agency. reported the capture of Slnyang. loo miles north of Hankow, the Chinese military capital. SPANISH WAR FLARES Spanish war dispatches, too. told o; the renewal of fierce fighting. Government forces were reported to be scoring successes in a drive that recovered the PandoLs moun- tains and again threatened Gan- desa, vital Insurgent communica- tions center on the Ebro river front. Meanwhile, Hungarians In Czech- oslovakia received the Hungarian army with flowers is the troops marched into Ipolysag, one of the See POWERS, Pr. IZ, Col porters he would go down the line A. Holland. The others are being jaclc' cabine.u of Cisco 'also four.d j attack. Oil Driller Found Dead At Albany ALBANY. Oct W. (Bill! White. 45. an oil driller, was found dead in his room at the Mc- Lemore hotel at this morning. He was lying face down on the floor when found. White had lived In Albany two Death was attributed to an ico and Clovis in Xew Mexico. The Weather next month's election. More Rain Needed For Texas Ranges AUSTIN'. Oct- 11. _ One Fatally Burned In Waco Hotel Fire i cattle that had strayed from their j pasture. i Largents And Frost Win Fair Awards Suruvors include his mother, who lives at Cushlng. Oklahoma, three brothers and three slsiters. i Funeral arangements are Inr.om- plete. pending arrival of relatives. Lewis Refuses To Speak On Radio Hookup AFL President- Unopposed For Reelection Friday HOTISTOlf, Oct. William Green of The American Federation at Labor tonight placed hii future as head of the federation in the) hands of work- men. He called John L. Lewis' offer to resign aa C.I.O. chair- man, if Green would step down ai A. of L. president "an at- tempted fraud on the public." BROADCAST CANCELLED "It U Green said, "that even if he (Lewis) resigned as chairman of C.I.O. he still would remain Its dictator." A projected broadcast tonight with lewis and Green discussing Lewis' offer to resign if Green, would, was cancelled late today by the National Broadcasting com- pany after Lewis declined to speak. Green, u yet unopposed, is up for reelection Friday. In Wish- ington today Lewis offered to re- tire as C.I.O. chieftain 1! Green would relinquish the AP. of U presidency. Lewis' offer came er. the o( L. convention yea-- (erdiy adopted s resolution sayinf imnuil iwould help to bring libor. peace. "The presidency of the Ameri- can Federation of Labor la in elec- tive Green said. chairmanship of the CIO. is in entirely different proposition. officers of the C.I.O. not elect- ed by the workers they presume to represent. They are self consti- tuted, self appointed, self perpet- uating. CIO HEAD 'DICTATOR' "I conceive It to be my duty u president of the of L. to be the spokesman for the majority of the workers who rule federation. I have never sought I do not now seek to Impose, my personal views on the mem- bers of the federation, nor to con- trol or dominate Its policies. In every statement and in every act ol the A.F. of L. I have sought earnestly and honestly to present the majority viewpoint. "On tile other hand, the chair- man the C.I.O., as everyona knows, is the dictator ot the CJ.O. He has not once even consulted membership of the C.I.O. during his regime. "Now he offers to resign if I will. "Well, the Torld series is over, but the chairman of the C.I.O. is still making grandstand plays. Bis offer is in attempted fraud and deception on the public. To any- one familiar with the labor situ- ation, it is obvious that even U hi resigned as chairman ot the C.I.O. he would still remain its dictator behind the scenes. Because hs would remain as president and dictator of the United Mine Work- ers of America. Uie union which U the financial angel of the C.I.O. See LABOR. 12, Col 6 ,loti4, i Insure frrass. the u. S, de-: WTST TEX warwr In I Trnmrift; NT.1V MT and Thursday Itirt. TEMPKRATfRF.S HOI H WACO. Oct. H.-.T.-Or, wrson live-stock L, enjoying good grazing burr'rrt 10 and a'PictinS this fall but more rains are needed wsre injured sncl 30 roomers were resources of Texas viewed by forced 10 fire in their more than persons durin? when Ore o! origin Dallas day at the state fair here to- destroyed the hotel in day, downtowr. Waco H B ,hp The bod. of Tnm Barker. ?i. ,'r.ie Hereford cattle. The HarrMale found sn ;he smo'.derinu embers two farm. Fort Worth, owned by Dr. C. hoars the started. H. Harris, won top honors 'in the Mrs. H E proprietor of Hereford ti.c ho-.cl. a two-story The miry of jack Frwt, Dallas oil sp. a.nro ar.n.e over .1 man and rancher Lady Anxiety ba.conv m csrapnt the [tamos and ,as chwen reserve champion It- her ;on. Jor.n. suf.crcd burr.i not malf. Frost's rar.rh i.- 3'- Blaricwell. n West Texas. C. M Laritcn'. and Sons. Mer-cel. >h ipartment of agriculture reported to- ,ijij: day. Northwest ar.d Weft Texas and the coastal plains received good i precipitation in September bat oth- >i. er area.? .suffered. Generallv the Io01' for Sraz'nK on grain fields was m not jjood. Justice Stone 66 OTHER PRODUCE Thanksgiving Turkey Market To Be No Higher--Possibly Lower-Than In 1937 Prices on turliev.s Thanksgiving market higher, and possibly lower, than las year, acceding to local produce WASHI.VOTO.V, Oct. Harlan F. stone, a.wxiate Justice of the supreme became 6S ?Mrs today. He part o! ;he ri.iy to at'omcvs Tr.f o'clock, Although the current crop of tur- keys over the nation is about the same ss last year, and the cold stor- d'irin? the i according to general opinion. Forag- will be no inj has been good for tiie birds this year, and fewer will sell as No. 2. Marketing of turkeys will begin in Abilene the [trst wee's In November, when the Thanksgiving market Thanksgivir.s Is five days enrliet 'his yaer than last, fallinj on Xov- ,-H hv i-u DM age carryover not as sreat. prices I ember 24. Movement of turkevs from and bu.i award wiih Publiran Domino1 expected la be affected by prevailing 1 Abilene usuallv begins lower prices on o'.her produce. Iwi Turkeys In We.s: Texas are In bet- 77th. 22 old. beer, to J M, for SJjOO. with delivery next spring, iter condition than a year ago.' head of time, amoving shlp- -1 merit to northern ar.d eastern mar- Columbo Sails Again; Or, Discovering The Queen's Pawn Tickets A one-act drammer with no beginning, a lott ending and a hidden climax. Children under the aire of 16 years shouldn't read It for tear of damaging their mentality and those over RO years couldn't possibly stand lo read it. SETTING: A bright Octoner IZ, 193S, In New York. A dust storm would be blowing if a heavy (of had not settled down over the barber. A larre crowd has gathered at the wharf. Today is the day Columbo completes his fifth vojaire lo America, But the crowd Is gathered because a typographical error in Ihe newspaper jald that ('dumbo was arriving m the Queen Mary Instead of his own little craft. Ihe Aonl Marj-. With one last whctie the lil-lle boat chargrs uj> to wharf. There is a of air brakes and thp partittr-whrtts srrccrh thry skid from to appears at the top of the jang plank in chair and waves at the bewildered crowd. COT.fMBO: M.v Friends a Hyde Tark Ills Indeed A happy :or me to tip nilh jon ajaln on Irm s.icrtct spot. CHAIRMAN' OF THE COMMITTEE: Hi, chum. What jjors on here? C'Ol.l'MBO: (irrctintv And lo whom rlo 1 h.vve the honor of spoakine? CHAIRMAN': Smith. John Smilli. Hut don't srl sentimental. it on dnun and lot's fft this parade ovrr with. I'vp start so many thrm lately that 1 can't 1-iok a decent noodle in the eye, COI-l'MRO: Oh. 1 re-[ member you. America's first Casanova weren't you? I remember RKPORTFR: Kt( pardon. My name KiacVsiwarky. from the Evening Blurb and i Rubble. How about i Well, lefi sec. numbered fcS >ouls the dark and dritzlr Friday rnorninf on August 3. I54J when we wtllb-ed anchor and itood for the Canary blinds. The boj'n wu In hU bunk with a bad hangover and the ship doctor came to me for J uld lo him you can quote on this, lo him. 'Sail on, salt on, sail on." REPORTER: Yeah, t know. We rot all Um dope from jaw publicity man, VThlt the toyiire oter? Dkl jou see pciiRUlns? COLUMBO: Welt, we See cOI.niBO, Tl. 11, Cot 7-   

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