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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: October 11, 1938 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - October 11, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               WIST TEXAS' WM MHBMKR VOL. 133. OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKEKJH VQIJR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT AFTER FIERY DEBATE BETWEEN GREEN AND TOBIN- ABILENE, TEXAS, TUESDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 11, 1938. PAGES PRICE FIVE CENTS Against CIO And NLRB BABY OPOSSUMS PROVIDE CUE FOR NEW METHOD 10 CORRECT DEAFNESS WASHINTON, Oct. new method of correcting human deafness Is developing from studies of the hearing of baby Prof. Olof Larsell, of the University ol Oregon, said today. He told the American Acad- emy of Ophthalmology and Otolarymgology of lib findings regarding the reactions of the tiny animals to sounds of vary- ing pitch and loudness. They show that deafness Is in many cases an inability to hear ordinary spoken words or music because of an insensi- tlvity of the cochlea, or sound- receiver In the ear, to sound in that range. Lower or higher notes may be perfectly audible. The cochlea, which is a snail- like bone Inside the eardrum, Is apparently arranged like a flight a stairs, the various parts of which are sensitive only to sounds within a vary definite range, Prof. Larsell said. Experiments with the opos- sums showed that they heard very high-pitched sounds, such as the squeak ot the mother, within a few hours after birth. Ability to hear other sounds developed as the cells o! the cochlea developed, while the animal was growing to maturity. If a part of the cochlea was Injured the animal became completely deaf to sounds which were received by that part of the hearing organ, and Dr. Larsell found that each section ot U was sensitive only to a certain pitch. It was abo found possible to AS PROBE IS SPURRED- examine the cochlea of the Dy- ing animal under a microscope and predict the range of sound which It would not be able to hear. Thus. Dr. Larsell's colleagues pointed out, the degree of deafness In a human being may be determined by exam- ination ol the cochlea, after the method Is developed, and steps may be taken to correct It. Shockelford Officers Hold Stolen Cattle Bulgarian Chief Of Staff Is Slain Two-Gun Assassin Shoots Self, Near Death Of Wounds SOFIA, Bulgaria, Oct. ltt_yp) The chief of staff of the Bulgarian army. Major General yordan Pey- eff. was shot to death In a Sofia street today by a two-euii assassin who then tried to kill himself. Gen. Peyelf. 55, died en route to a hospital. His adjutant. Major Stoyanoff, also was struck by some of a a lull dozen shots fired and wns In a serious condition. The shots were fired by a man who gave his name as Stoil Kirofl, 33. He was expected to die of self- inflicted wounds. Rumors that Kirolf wa.s a politi- cal conspirator who was recently released from jail were discredited by police. They were Investigat- ing, however, the possibility the as- sassin belonged to a ter- roristic organization. Gen. Peyeff apparently was well liked in the army because he seem- ed entirely disinterested In politics The Bulgarian press feared the murder might start a feud tirallar to the Macedonian terror which rocked the country until several years ago. Eye-witriPRes said the slayer held a each hand, firing a stream of shots from each. McM Homecoming Committee Named H. Leo Tucker. Maurlne Roe and Arlle Garner were appolnled as a committee to make local reception arrangements for the McMurry col- lege homecoming at a meeting of alumni and ex-students at the Woolen hotel last night. McMurry's homecoming Is slaled November !2, day of the indlan- Soulhwestern universlly grid con- tent. Two dozen attended last night's meeting, which was the first since the spring commencement's session Out of town exes present were Mr and Mrs. John Lewis Bonner of Art- son ana the Rev. A. p. click of Wylle Caffey. president of the Abilene Ex-studenU association presided. Caffey will appoint a committee to proceed toward decision whether the alumni associa- tion .shall slate its preference to the collie board regarding a suc- cessor for Dr. Thomas W. .Brab- ham, who has resigned. Area Freight Rate Structure Studied AppraUaf of West Teaxs freight rait structures for a report to the TCXM chamber of commerce traffic committee was begun yes- terday by Manager A. Bandeen and E. R. Tanner of El Paso, trafuc manager. The report will be submitted com- rmltcerncn at a meeting in Abilene. probably next week. Its prerara- ilon fulfill, a piank In the regtonai chamber's 1938 program, drafted at lhe last convention. 5 Germany's "Gestapo." nazi propaganda organization, Is con- centrating on the United States, Editor Arnold Gingrich, above, of Ken Magazine, charged be- fore the Dies un-Amertcan ac- Uvttle.- committee In Washing- tori" Three-departments devot- ed to espionage in this country have been added to "Gestapo" In the past year, he said. Reich 'Regrets' Cardinal Attack Report Hitler's Aide Will Send Nazis To Camp VIENNA. Oct. W Joseph Buerckel. chancellor Adolf Hitler's commissioner for Austria, was un- derstood to have returned to Vien- na today Intent upon sending to concentration camps persons re- sponsible lor nazi attacks upon 62- year-old The-xlore Cardinal innll- zer. The attacks are "deeply regret- led" In official Germanv. It was said. The agency Diensl Aus Deukch- !and In an inspired arUcIe from Berlin said Buerckel had "taken most vigorous action" against dem- onstrations Including that Saturday ilght, when the cardinal was cut by flying gJasj in the stoning of his Palace in St, Stephen's square by nazi mobs. Dienst Aus said: "Incidents in Vienna In the course of a-hlcn demonstrations were made against Cardinal InnlUer are y regretted In official German cir- cles. "Reich Commissar Buerchel has' aken most vigorous action against the provocative demonstrations "He has taken the guilty parlies severely to account and has an- nounced that after undergoing pun- ishment inflicted by the courts they will be given time to reflect upon hcir conduct In a concentration camp." All churches and parochial ofti- ces in Vienna were being guarded onight by police or storm troopers to prevent attack 'by radical anti- Catholic elements." 52 Of 100 Head Are Identified Texas Rangers Assist; Three Ranchmen Held By HARRY HOLT ALBANY, Oct. of- ficers, assisted by Texas Rang- ers, today spurred _their efforts to crack what appears to be the biggest cattle stealing racket in Shackelford county's history. BRANDS INSPECTED Meanwhile, West Ccnlral Texas stockmen and officers began the tedious. Job of Identifying cattle stolen to their respective areas were Inspecting crudely branded animals in two herds he- Ing held east ol here by county officers. Already 52 cows and cajves have been claimed by Shackelford ranchers from approximately 100 held. Tentative identifications were' made today by stockmen from' Hamlln. Merkel. Moran, Putnam and Palo Pinto, who reported losses during the summer. Work on the case was started last Tuesday when one of the three of a pioneer Shack- elford county ranch family-being held In jail was arrested by officers M he attempted to load cattle from pasture adjoining his ranch County Attorney Triomas L. Blanton Jr. and Sheriff John Hol- land today questioned the prisoners and other suspects pr-paratory to filing charges. Several other mem- bers of the family were released after questioning. The remaining unclaimed cattle carry various and sundry brands some having as many as halt a dozen different marts, making Identification difficult Albany Bank Robber On 'Rock' Insane, Attorney Says In Asking Examination SAN FRANCISCO. Oct. C. Lucas, Texas desperado and Alcatraz convict, has become Insane, his attorney' said today. Lucas. 26, faces prosecution lor murder for the slaying of an Aleatraz prison guard In an attempled prison break May 23. He was convicted and sent to Alcatraz for robbing an Albany (Tex.) bank. Today his attorney. Harold C. Faulkner, appealed to the federal court to appoint pey- chiatrisU to examine Lucas who was represented as sitting In his cell, alternating Incoher- ent rnuttertags with shouU at other Inmates. Lucas once was reported to have attacked Al Capone in a convict fight on the Island pris- on. He and Rufus lYanklin, K. Alabama murderer, face trial lor the murder of Guard Royal C. dine. Thomas Limerick a convict, was killed by a guard during the attempted break morning, to AbUree Crashes Into Deer SANTA MONICA. Calif CW. 10 into a wild deer that ran out on a highway, Mrs Geraldine Baker, wife of radio singer Kenny Baker, was seriously Injured today when her automobile overturned twice. ACC ASKS WEST TEXAS STUDENTS TO TRINITY GAME AS FLIER KEEPS SILENCE- AH hig'i school students and faculty members within a 100- mile radius of Abilene are be- ing invited to be guests of Abi- lene Christian college Saturday as tin: Wildcats meet lhe Trin- ity university cicven here at Morris stadium. Twenty thousand identifica- tion slips are tjeinj mailed to 645 schools around Abilene With these slips rilled out and .signed by some school official, any high school student ol the section may obtain a fret pass to the football game in the afternoon. These slips arc to be prejented 'i-tHrday. In addition to the game, the college will hold a special chapel program and lours will be made of the campus with the guests for the day. Rainfall Routs Area's Drouth Local Thundershowers Forecast Today; Precipitation In Abilene Gauges .99 Inch Rainfall of almost an Inch, falling parently checked the month and hal near-by territory. Last night the rain-gauge at the local weather bureau registered Si Forecast today calls 'or the moisture here Jury 21 when flood waters threatened to flow over the incomplete construc- tion at the Port Phanlom Hill reservoir -7? late lhe !Ma ralnfa" 'lands at 39.79 Inches, far theid of the Inches for lhe same period in---------------- 1937. Normal precipitation for the year up .to October 10 Is 20.7! inches. Farmers and ranchmen through- out the territory- of 15 counties surrounding Abilene rejoiced over the small rainfall, with continued rain lhe ranchers will be able to hold lambs and calves until higher markets instead ol selling at the present below-par quotations. The rain will enable farmers lo begin planting of small grains for which fields have already been prepared for planting since August. Some growers have already "dusted in" the seed and say the rain will be enough to bring up a good stand. Yeslerday's rain. fell in a wide area. Fisher county reported cov- erage over the entire section, while Scurry county reported spoiled showers. Precipitation at Snyder totaled .83 Inches. Knoic City received half an inch and Benjamin reported about the same amount. More than sn Inch I fell at Anson and quarter-Inch "drkzles fell at Stamford and Has- kell. Colorado and the immediate vi- cinity received heaviest fall of (lie weather map with 1  t one point, threat- ened take the teamsm1 onion out ol organized labor1! field, ii he, the lone outstand- ing advocate of a plan to fores the eiecntlTC council to reopen peace negotiations where ther were broken oH between the A. F. of L. ami the C, I. O. last December, bitterly asiallcd the resolutions committee report. The resolutions committee wound up Iti scathing attack on the rival CIO 'and It3 leadership by "recom- mending the council "carry on the battle" but stand ready to respond "to any genuine appeal for peace." Scornfully, Tobin said: "That's what we did last year and lhe year before and we will do next year unless the members of our na- tional and International unions in- sist we do othe-wlse." FAVOHS REFERENDUM "I am he said, "that a referendum would carry 20 to 1 that the council open up negotiations where they broke oil In the last session with CIO. "I disagree with any man who says you humbling yourself when you ask people who disagree with you to meet you and talk over the disagreement." "The principle Involved here." he shouted, "is to bring together the masses of toilers of the nation. That transcends any personal or partisan feeling" Tobln assailed the resolutions committee's six page attack on the CIO and Levis. and said the call- Ing of such names as "traitors, dic- tators and Judases'' had further spoiled the hope of peace. His voice becoming hoarse with the strain of debate, Tobin de- See AFL, 10, Col. 5 YOUTH Jn The News AUTHOR-TU.USTRATOR While visiting an aunt In Portland. Ore., 14 year old Charles deck, of Keiso, Wash., became friendly with her long- earned, mournful-looking dog. Returning home he wrote and Illustrated a book called Eblrd, the dog as its hero. Czech, Hungarian Talks Near Break KAROS.C. Czechoslovakia. Oct. 10 between Czech- oslovakia and Hungary for settle- ment of Hungary's minority claims in Czechoslovakia were reported at the breaking point tonight because delegates of the Prague government considered Hungarian demands 'outrageous." It was understood the Hungarian "minimum claims" Include some territory In Carpatho-Riissia. ex- treme eastern portion ot Czecho- slovakia, which would eive Hungary PI-ONLY COMPLEE free accett 10 the Polish border to the north. AUTOBIOGRAPHY' When Sir Denzil Cope sold his mansion whlch-had been In the family more than 200 years, his 12-year-old daughter, Joan, wrote and illustrated a book telling of her life there. She's shorn here In her home near London. Nazis Complete Occupation Of Czech Zones Work Of Uniting Sudetens With Reich Begins BERLIN, Oct. The German irmy tonight had complete control of all SndeUn German territory awarded from Czechoslovakia by the Munich four-power accord and deci- sions of the informational com. mission sitting in Berlin. "Within ten days the national change of title to Sudetenland vat accomplished." Dienst Aus Deut- schland observed, -and nowhere there incident! worth men- tioning, although the atmosphere had become decidedly heated through events preceding." Dienst AUS reflects the general attitude of both official d unofficial Germany. (Relchsfuehrer Adolf Hitler In t Sunday address at Saarbruecien Inferentlallj placed at scniare miles the amount of Czechoslovak territory occupied. Unofficial esti- mates had placed It at square miles. He said the nazis In 1938 had added square IciJomeSers, or square miles, to the relch, Aoitrla added square miles of this, leaving the Sudetenland figure at approximately square miles.) There U a feeling of relief that the entire Sudetenland oc-'jpaHon occurred smoothly and, m far u the army b concerned, practically on the. minute. In _ the opinion of foreign comniEntatorj the real sori begins. The task is the Sudetenland administration In line with the rest of the retch and solving the multitude of German- Czech problems, chiefly of an economic nature, arising from Ger- man acquisition of Sudetenland. As the first outward gesture. Chancellor Hitler decreed that swastika flag now Is the flag of the Sudetenland as' well. Secondly, he decreed that relch'j cot of arms the offic- ial waU be used throughout newly-absorbed territory. Thirdly, German law now ap- plies to the fludetenland. More difficult than these self- evident measures, however, were A maze of economic proWemj to faced. STUDIOUS DANCER A preis agent caught Prances Smith, n, doing her homework while waiting to dance at a Broadway night soot. She at- tends high school during the day and works as a chorus girl at night. HELPS THE POOR Vivian Tenr.ey. York medical college student, carries on welfare work arr.ong people In the Tennwce mountains for the Golden R-iie Foundation. She bfJrifr.d., mothers bi car- in; for r.rw-born LADY A5TOR BLAMES LONDON RED PAPER FOR LINDBERGH 'LIE' Oct. 10 __ T._____., LONT30S. Oct. 10- W- Aftor. Britain's Virginia-bom M P tonight rlerlarer! the London com- munlJt newspaper, the Daily Work- er, vtf for (he story that Col. Charles A. Lindbergh crit- icized the Soviet air force at a din- ner at her home. "This emanates from the same Dailj Work- said KC gave a dinner to Lindbergh anil Invented the Morj- of (he riiwrfrn thc vlsrountris said. "There ta nn trulh ln For months fapers have charged an ailstocratic pro-German group centering about Laiiv Aster's home and knowi as See 10 for cleliils of Soviet accusations. the "Cllvenden set" Influenced Prime Minister Chamberlain in h.'s dlctator-appeawment policy. Earlier today the labor paper Daily Herald, quoted Udy Astor ss declaring the Lmdrwrgh story a "compirtp itr." 'Cnl. Lindbfrrith has not dmcd with IL< since he relumed from Russia .md in fact I have never given a dinner parM- for hlm." the newspaper quoted her. "It a complete lit. too. that Col. Lindbergh his ever madf any sort of pronouncement about the Russian air force or about anything rise durlnj dinner party at my house or in my house at all." Col. Lindbergh was denounce tl bv eleven Sou.i airmen in a publnhixl in Moscow today. Thev lip was a cur.M m I_viv Astor's home when he made state'. merits rii-rosatory of Soviet aviation and may havr encouraged influ- conservative lo Minls'er Cnambcrlain to go ahrari with hi.- agrcfrctnt !o per-1 mil Adolf Hitler to dismember Col. Lindbergh refused comment I this afternoon when he landed in i Kottrream en route from Paris to Ber'.in. bffore WASHINGTON. Oct. 10- ,T, _ Mrs. Franklin D will have two birthday cakes tomorrow when she 34 years ol age. The National Women's Press club will jive her a birthday luncheon, wiih cake and candles. In the eve- nine, there win be the usual Roose- velt family celebration, although she and president are the only rr.emhrrs o' family In the white There 11 be i rake with 51 ran- became the Roosevelt never count the jeais beyond that age. j U. S. Without Funds'" WASHINGTON', Oct. _ Kin? Georje of England may pre- cipitate a minor financial crisis here IWCTOG Director Of Eastland Succumbs EASTLAND. Oct. _ K. F Page, about 40, Eastlar.d oil opera- tor, died tonight liter an illness o! weeks. He had bern J di- rector of the West Central Texas Oil and Gas Callahan Road Job lo Be Let Oil Firm Offers State Park Site Secretary Lauds Canyon Tract In County Judge J. C. Hunter of lhe Grls- ham-Hunter corporation announc- ed yesterday that his firm has prof- fered the state of Texas, for park purposes, two sections of land in the Guadalupe mountains of Cul- berson county. Prom Austin a report that William J. Lawson, parks board secretary, will recommend acceptance of the acres. Judge Hunter returned home fti- day alter accompanying Lawson and other officials on an Inspection tour of the Grisham-Hunter land. The state parks board secretary, ac- cording to Austin dispatches, said of the proffered land: "McKlttrlck canyon, in the area, is one ot ttie most beautiful sights I ever Its uprear lo 3.500 feet U the only area in Texas where elk. mountain sheep and rainbow trout all may be found." Judge Hunter says the offer to the stale is conditioned upon the building of a first class road, eight milts, from the nearest highway to the property, also upon an ex- tensive Improvement program to be carried out by the state through the Citizens Conservation Corps. Gris- ham-Hunter owns acres in Culberson county, the property ad- Joining Llnco.'n national park. Another inspection of the acre- age offered the state will within two or three weeks, Judjt Hmter stated lav, nifnt. The Weather Sheesley Midway Calls It Quits TwrforminrM of thf Shelley Midway at thp Frrf farr jfrounds have cancelled hfrau't of thf Mtrcmrly small crowd atttnd- inir ytilridir The carnival will leave th'A morning for Waco where it wil] ojwn Friday al the Valley Mir, Merle Grurer. West Free fair secretary, wld n.'jhl that of iht mid- way made the decision after ard in fare nf rrtnlJnufd ihrrairninj wrath- tr. a1, v.r r.rv r-.rrnrz bridge v-v.v i 31 fr-m B ,M frKi,   

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