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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: October 8, 1938 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - October 8, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               Defenses Hold Fast: Mustangs And Eagles Play Scoreless Tie Before Crowd Of 2 WEST TEXAS' OWM NEWSPAPER VOL LVI 11, NO. 130. "WITHOUT, OR WITH OPFENSK TO FRIENDS OR FOKS SKE'lCIl YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS I'C ABILENE, TEXAS, SATURDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 8, PAGES. PRICE FIVE CENTS EFFECTIVE DECEMBER 1- McMurry President Hands Resignation To Board RESIGNING POST DR. T. W. BRABHAM Admirer NAZIS BAN NOSEGAYS Scratched By Associated BERLIN, Oct. estimated tonight that by Oct. 10 Germany will have annexed nearly one-jllth o[ Czechoslo- vakia. Reichsfuehrer Hitler toured his run territory and was scratched on the face by TOM (horns when struck by boutittet thrown hy an admirer. Authorities Immediately ban- ned all flower-throwing in the future. The army prepared to ad- vance tomorrow Into the fifth zone delimited by the intcrna- (tonal commission In Berlin. German troops today pushed to completion occupation of the last uf the four Sudetenland zones delineated In the Munich four-power conference. When the llfth zone is occu- pied by Oct. 10, the best avail- able figures tncfcated Germany will have annexed 11.503 square area nearly the size of the state of Maryland. Hitler suffered the first mis- hap in hts series of four tri- umphant tours of Sudetenland in the flower-throwing Incident which occurred at Jacgerndorf, in the fourth zone of military occupation. Although medical attention was not needed for the scratch- es on Hitler's face, the accident caused a stir in nazi official- dom. Nazi leaders will be held rt- aponslble for seeing that the ban on flowers Is carried out. Cowboys Fight It Out Tonight Top Hands Of Outfit Spilled In Fifth Show Sixth nnci final act of Beutle Brothers rodeo at the West Texa Free fair will lake place in the fai trena lontyht as cowboys and cow- girls fight it out for grand prize. Competition has been stiff week especially In the steer an bronc riding. Several upsets In th events the last two nights has let the field open to would-be mone winners. A fair-sized crowd last night some of the Southwest's meanes )r. Brabham }lans Return fo Pastorate Board President Names Group To Pick Successor Dr. Thomas W. Brabham 'riday afternoon tendered his onnal resignation as president of McMurry college to the executive board of BOARD ACCEPTS In handing the resignation io the ward he expressed a desire to re- urn to an active pastorate and aid he had tentative plans of re- olning the Northwest Texas Melh- adlst conference this fall. The executive board accepted the esignatlon. not effective until De- ember 1, but final action fill be aken by the Methodist conference ward of education, to convene No- ember 17. The Rev. W. M. Murrell. presi- lent of the board of trustees, ap- W. J. Pulwllcr. H. O. Wooten, E. R. McDaniel, Dr. O. P. Clark of Lubbock and the Rev. C. R, Hooten of Plalnview as a com- mittee to select Dr. Brabham's accessor. Fulwllcr was named ihalrman. The committee will hold ts first meeting within the nest ex days. "This is my own Dr. Brabham si Id last ntjht. "When 1 left the ministry to become president of T. W. C. Fort Worth. I made a vow that I would give only eifht or ten. years to outside I am finishing my eighth year ont of the ministry." "I want to get back to a pastor- he zald. "1 feel that I tan of greater service .to my church .here than elsewhere." Dr. Brabham was elected .presi- dent of Texas Women's college at Fort Worth in 1930. Previously he was pastor ot the First Methodist church at Pampa. While there he supervised construction of a XX) church building, and the mem- bership of the church was tripled. TO MCMURRY IN 1935 In 1933 Texas Women's college was changed to Texas Wesleyan college and made a co-educatlona college. During the five years Dr Brabhem was at T. W. C. the en- rollment increased from 161 stu- dents to nearly 750. He came to McMurry college De cember 1, 1935 to succeed Dr. C Q, Smith who went to Southern Methodist university as vlce-prest dent. While Dr. Brabham has been It McMurry college a endowment campaign has been launched, Medley stadium con- structed and the campus beau- tlficatlon project furthered. All buildings on the campus have bwn reconditioned. This year the college has one at the larg- est enrollments in 1U history. In all departments there Is a resident enrollment of close Io 600 students. Travelers Take Over West Texas Fair's Finale TO MAKE SURE YOU'RE SOBER, CHECK UP ON YOUR MILLIGRAMS, PHYSIOLOGISTS ADVISE BOSTON, Oct. keep sober, check up on your milligrams Three Vale scientists today 'disclosed the Quantities o( al- cohol in the form of whisky highballs, gin cocktails and beer that could be imbibed before alcoholic concentration In the blood stream reached a divid- ing line they propose between strict sobriety and "under the One (count iti whisky high- ball; one (count lhat, too) Martini cocktail; or 1 to 1 1-2 quarts of beer may be taken 'on an empty stomach) with- out the concentration of alcohol in 'the blood exceeding 0.5 milli- gram per cubic centimeter. Reporting to the New Eng- land Journal of Medicine. Phy- siologists Howard W. Haggar, M. D., said they chose that cri- terion because It was the value "below which all men are rea- sonably sober." and not the value (1.5 mgl "at which the majority are Just on the verge of serious Between these two poles (pre- sumably because Joe DoXes can hold his likker with more grace than his brother. comes the big headache for police and courts in deteiminlng who is "under the influence." If the 0.5 mb arbitrary line were adopted, Ihe .scientist held, it "would enable thu courts to put the burden where It belongs. It would rest, not on the physicUn. hut on the motorist and the pedMtrlan." And, In order to give both motorists and pedestrians an idea of how much elbow bend- Ing they could do without get- ting top-heavy with tell-tale milligrams, the Yalemen set up a few rounds of ly scientifically, of course. To five young men. ranging in weight from iso to ns pounds, they gave varying quantities of whisky, gin and beer, before breakfast, then started count- Ing up milligrams. Their conclusions: One highball, or one cocktail, or up to a quart and a half of beer may be had on an empty ftomach before the danger line is reached; Alter a meal, double these quantities may be taken with the same effect. WITH CURTAIN DROPPING AT EVERYBODY BUYS A TICKET TODAY No passes honored at the West Texas tair grandstand everybody a ticket lor the horse raws at 2 p. m. and the rodeo at 8 p. m. That includes Mayor Will W. Hair, shown here stepping up to the box (or his tickets, and D. H. Jefferies, fair president, and all the rest. All this, by way of Loyalty Day to help In an effort to erase some of the financial difficulties which loom as result ot small attendance at the grandstand shows. "Let's everybody go to the West Texas fair races and rodeo to- day." said Jetferles. "We are asking the public to cooperate in helping the fair to pay off." No charges for the main gata It remain.1: free to everybody. And Now Neither Milkman Nor 'Par Can Get The Cream By Pouring Off The Top ITHACA, N. Y., Oct. success In making milk from which the cream cannot be skimmed was announced today by Cornell university. Neither the milkman, nor "Pa" pouring off the top of the morn- Ing bottle first, can get the cream. It can't be done, the announce- ment says, even U the bottle stands for a year. The process has been under development seven years. As now completed the cream-spreading machine is a steel chamber with pistons to drive fresh milk through small openings. Pressures of 2.000 to pounds force the fluid through slots thin as paper. The result is to crush the fat globules so thty distrib- ute completely through the milk siid are never able to get together again. Fear Man Slain Near Lubbock ALBUQUERQUE. N. M. Oct. developments In tlte search for Virgil Vaughan. 27. of Baldwin. Kas.. missing since August 2 when he last was seen here, led officers tonight to the belief he may have been murdered between Albu- querque and Lubbock, lex. Meanwhile, federal and slate au- thorities pressed their hunt for an unidentified "blond man" whose movements police have traced through Texas to Lake Providence, la., where he sold an automobile Rome Sets Up New Chamber Fascist Council Decrees Abolition Of Deputies In Step Promised By II Duce broncs and steers spill top hands! Mcniified as Vaughan's and dispos- of the oulfit, of a pair of the missin; man's Tack Bolton of Red RocV. who Isno" and nls up to now has had an edgrc on the rest of the boys In steer riding, lasted about one-fifth of a second last nteht when he drw a mean- eyert Brahma. Jim Langston of Abilene lasted one Jump and Car- rol Johnson of El Paso also lilt dirt. Lvnn Abbott of Fort Worth Joined Ihe group when a steer pin- wheeled out from under him In the See RODEO, Pit. 5, Col. 7 Relief Denied, Roils Decide On Pay Cut WASHINGTON. Oct 7 A blunt-spoken railroad executive who from the rankx said to- day (hat railroad managements dc- cldcrl upon a 15 per rent wapc re- duction after failing to obtain re- lief at (he Ia.it sesston of consrc-vt. ROME. Oct- The fascist grand council earl> to- day decreed abomion of the lultan chamber ol deputies and establish- ment in ius place of a new chamber of fajtce.s and In a step long promised by Pre- mier Mussolini, the chamber of dep- uties, already ot all power, ill cease io exist at the end ot its present j Henceforth legislation will be en-: aclwJ by the Italian ?cnate and a; new lower house composed of rep- resents t (VPS of lasctt party each unit known as a and! of the guilds and corporations intol which commerce. labor, industry and the protections have been united by the totalitarian regime. The grand council. faJCL-'m's 51.1-' preme policy-making body. 15 to meet again tonisht for of international affairs. The council also was expected to study French-Italian relations in light of the French decision to an to Rome. U.S. Warns Italy On Discrimination WASHINGTON. Oct. United States note asking Italy not to discriminate against American Jews within her borders was made public by the slate department to- day. Italians in the Umtfil States, the note said, are granted equality of treatment under the law. It express- ed bciicf that "upon further con- sideration the Italian government will decide that American cltuens lawfully widtnR in Italy will not be discriminated against on ac- count of race or creed." C Of C Is Host For Barbecue Traveling Men's Parade To Move At Today traveling men are head- ed toward the West Texas free fair. PLAN' FOR 600 With a program that opens early this morning, members or the Abi- lene Traveling Men's association, are all set for the annual traveling men's day and reunion, an occa- sion which had long been the grand finale of .the West Texas Jalr when the exposition program was drop- ped in 1930, and an event revived with great success last year. Plans are ill s-t by the chamber of commerce to entertain 600 trav ellng men and their wives at i luncheon, on the fair grounds- serving barbecue and all the trim- mings. That Is at noon, and the morning offers features for the travelers too. At midnight tonight, the curtain will have dropped on the 1S33 ex- position. Automobile races, horse racing, rodeo wtth all Its speed and thrills, the Texas Cotton festival, Ihe Sheesley shows on the midway, exhibits Ui all departments which have set a new record to shoot at have been the offerings this week. There Is no let-op todaj: 9 a. exhibit building'? open. 9 a. men regis- ter at Hilton, Wooten, Grace and New Fincher hotels and re- ceive tad yen for the day'j IlvlUn. a. Men's parade, starting from the court- house lawn, 12 honor- ing traveling men, courtesy of Abilene chamber of commerce. Congressman Clyde L. Carre It guest of honor. 2 p. racing, the last of three days of this top entertainment, 8 p. Brothers ro- deo in its final performance. 9 p. Men's dance at the Wooten hotel. The travelers have the Bird Brand Cowboy band billed for t full day here. These musicians will appear in the parade, play at the luncheon, on the fair grounds dur- ing the afternoon, and will provide the music for the dance tonight. GARRETT IS GUEST Congressman Garret t also Js See FAIR, PC- 5, Col 6 HERE'S CHAMP HEAVYWEIGHT TEAM IN TUG CONTEST Here's the champion heavy- weight team of the first pull- ing contest staged at the West Texas fair. This sptendM photo shows the span of 7-year-old horses, weljhlny S.S80 pounds, hauling away at the dynamo- meter with Jake Rhodes of Hawley holding the lines. The team pulled pounds on the meter or the equivalent .of 10 torn' of dead weight. In order to qualify the team must pull the weight 21 feet and six inches. (Reporter-News Photo.) AFTER LABOR PEACE PLEA- Green Colls AFL Council Teamster Chief Urges Reunion Midland Rancher Sells 77 Herefords MIDLAND. Oct. j cf 77 head of registered Hereford cattte by John M. Gist was reported at Midland Thursday, the purch- I aser being D. L Hughes ot Merl- ton. Delivery was to be completed i Friday. i The deal included 50 head of two- j year old heifers, 25 head of heifer i calves and one bull. Gtst recently told his Ec'.or county ranch, with i the bulk of the cattle there going in the deal to Exiei and Tom Me- He sTiJ! operates his six- section place adjoining Midland on the south, on which are some oT his shew catrle and men choice 1 breeding s'rc'rc. Session Revives Speculation On Decisive Action HOUSTON. Oct. William Green, wielding the gavel ovfir the American Federation of Labor 5Sth convention, called for a special session of hts executive council today after Daniel Tobln. gray, square-jaw president of the International teamster union, ap- pealed to delegate.1; for labor peace and a united labor movement. Green's call for the council meet- in? immediately revivcJ speculation the federation's high command may soon take decisive action, not. only 'on the question of making peace with John L. Lewis' C.I.O. but also on the personal pica from Prudent Roosevelr. Tlie leader of members of the teamsters' unioti, one of the aifiliareA in American Federation of toM delegates amendment :o the con'.roversiai Wagner aci wouM not settle (he federatinn's eomp'ainM the labor boarrl "All ;h? scr Ai'U rr mi. t> Ihe Wealher FDR CONSIDERS COORDINATION OF U. S. ESPIONAGE DEFENSES Asserts Foreign Spying Has Grown 'Substantially' In Last Ten Years PARK' N- T., Oct. increase in foreign spying in the United Stales in the last len years. President Roosevelt said today [tias led him to consider coordinatinn of counter-escionaze activities of various federal investtsating agenciM. ui Mr. Roosevelt disclosed at his press conference he was giving serious consideration to possible imprnrementj in methods of thwartinit naval and military espionage In this country. He added that while foreign tpy- 1ns may not now be on the Increase, it had grown substantially the list One possible approach to tie problem, he asserted, misht be the creation of new machinery to coordinate investigat- ions by military and naval In- telligence services. Ihe Federal Bureau of Investigation and various treasury agencies. At present, he said, all of these are responsible for some measure! of protection against spies. RETURNING FROM GARBO TALKS (UNEXPECTEDLY) ABOUT BABIES AND THE MUSIC OF STOKOWSKI The president made It clear considered military and naval syp- i in? as a question entirely separate frorn foreign efforts to disseminate j propaganda in this country. While the government has the responsibi- lity of protecting the nation against military and naval spies, he said there is no reason for it to set up a huse machine, Grant For Kermit Water System OK'd KERMIT. Oct. 7 -'Spli-City Jack wax advised bv Direc-.or George Bill! of For' Worth that Ktrmi'.'s 'r-r a 53! ?ran; !o Rites Today For S'water Doctor SWEETWATER Oc-. Funeral for Dr. A. A. Chapman. 65, pioneer physicur.. will be held here Saturday at 3 p. m. at Ihe Pint Methodist church. The Rev. George T. pastor, will officiate. Local are to act as pallbearers. Dr. Chapman at h-s home) en street at noon Ke had been m failmj [or several months. Dr, Chapman came to '.n 1306, H? hid .here s'.rce f.'iar a.-.d a .is 1> lcno-A-n in a.n.d i'.ir- roundin; >rrilory HP been f re.Mder.t o! the local board c: caticn for year; ,ir.d NEW YORK. Oct. 7.-.O-W- Greta Garbo :arw back from Europe today and ir an atmos- phere of exci'emcnt and quiet bantering unexpectedly drop- ped the role of the Swedish sphinx to about babies, the blessings of privacy and the rmisic of Leopold the orchestra conouctor. 11 was, an revers- al of what every one had ex- pected. Gone tras much of Ihe old srrref y. irie impMipncr. the as- perity, Garbo was talking in well-nlph faultless English. But cf (hat matter of haw she and Slokofc ski (eel about f arh other, Tvhclhfr they arr mar- ried nr are fning to he, she was af reticent as always about her prSva'.e lifr. "Let's ,n vr a laiiKhivi oner iitrruppers prcsrcd JKT about ihe nrjsici- an with whrm looked the of Cspr: For thoft '-.o had wen Gar- bo before. It was a highly transformed yoursff woman who stepped lightly through the library rioor of the lir.or liolm-a R'.cnrier Garbo, pale o! face, uncurled Mor.de hair to her shoulders, a fal.it oa her Jjp.s. innocent of Or.r of the r.. lourut CIILM given birth to a baby war, -ihc saM. on the voyage and Garbo. among others, had the and contributed to a fund (or us clothing. Yes, she llkrd babies. And she likes rrilldrrn. she said. Thai prompted vimrone to asK hrr If shr wrmld like to havf babies of her own. Per- haps, she but the world wn, "diTieuH" ot the Imminence of war. Shr had no to ra'ue children Io to to SpeaV-ine rf prnav., the .Mid xnuid h to have facf-s 1 Or.e face f-ir i a the r Jike. fl ar.o'hfr for niy priva'o life.' "If -aore marryir.K wi- Jort a would you lect 'The 5or onr. system been He h.id been ao'.r-e aopro1.rd the sllof.Pd C'v'c SUOM share S'.irvl'.ori aro ,.-.d er.e Jof vioiiM iin K TOTI begin t-xw w cl'v had saM .ir.1 L ,.u F. bondv A i-iq ____............___________......_ _ ?'.i'.er.-. Mri P C.v. ii 'in FIXTI Z Lightning Kills Girl, Mri s w" Sny- Scatters Clothing I ONGTOX. KAS Oc( DIJON. FTar.ce, 1 Ann Pctiaer, !2. tilt- wis Xii'.ed ar.d .ir.cthr: ed by 3 tr'.t chuied to wrtrti i'vo KAt'.erpvi her 15 Fter.ch rorr.t-st. pUn.cs   

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