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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: September 29, 1938 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - September 29, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               WEST TEXAS' Abilene "WITHOUT, OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOGS WE SKE'iCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT VOL LVIII, NO. 121. ABILENE, TEXAS, THURSDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 29, PAGES PRICE FIVE CENTS FOUR POWERS BARGAIN FOR PEACE TODAY EVENTS LEADING UP TO DRAMATIC PEACE CONFERENCE TODAY m Jly the Al' Kciilwe Sorviec ClllKKS engineered by Ailolf Ilillor have jiiven the world a lot of surprises, lint no one need liavc been surprised by the Czechoslovak affair. It wns a lone "IC making, even though no ouc could have been very sure un- til Intc this summer lhat Hitler would a great, bloodless vielory over Czechoslovakia (and Hnfjlantt. and 1'Yane.e. To at the very beginning; of the problem, you'd hfive to hack eenlnries lo I he immi- grations of (j'ermnns inlo Ilo- liemia. Then you could eon- liiiuc (he World M'ar aud Ilie pcaee treaties, coni- bijied Itolieniia with oilier Irt-- rilnry to form Czechoslovakia. (ierinauy's eomchaek as a world power, founded on Hit- ler's dream of a prcat Teutonic push to tlie east, made the prob- lem acute. Here's the way Hitler built a new Oermanv: 1 GERMANY'S MARCH to- ward power got of to a good start when Hitler sent sold- iers Into the iViinelanrt on Marcli 7, 1936, In violation of the Ver- sailles treaty, and set up this new "watch on Ihe Rhine." Hit- ler's autobiography had foretold the event; had foretold also that tile main direction of Germany's march would be eastward. The first crisis passed unchallenged. 2 DOWN CAME BARRIERS between Austria and Ger- many when Hitlers' army march- ed Into Autria on March II. this year, union quickly followed. In proclaiming such union neces- sary, he had promised that Ger- many would German minorities elsewhere, in Febru- ary he had demanded self-deter- mination for Czechoslovakia's Sudeten Germans. 3 FIRST REAL TROUBLE 1 for Czechoslovakia came soon after Hitler had achieved his Austrian objective. Indeed (here was talk that Der Fuehrer might move against Czechoslo- vakia Immediately. Indications ot how he would try to gain his ends came In April when Kon- rad Henleln, above, Nazi leader in Czechoslovakia, demanded autonomy for his people. Talk Is Hitler's Last Peace Try Fuehrer To Meet II Duce Ar Brenner Pass And Accompany Him To Munich BERLIN, Sept. 28. W) The peace conference at Munich tomor- row to be attended by the ranking statesmen of four leading Euro- pan powers w.-3 semi-officlally de- scribed tonight as Relchsfuehrer Hitler's "last effort to accomplish peaceful cession of Sudeter.land." Hitler and his "axis" partner. Premier Mussolini of Italy, will confer wllh British Prime Minister Chambcrjaln. French Premier Daladier in the forenoon to search' for a method of avoiding a second world war. No definite time nor exact place of meeting had beer. set. Reliable sources said tonight Hit- ler would meet Mussolini, already enroute lo Munich, at Brenner Pass, historic gateway between Italy and now German Austria, and then accompany II Duce to Munich. Announcement ot the Munich n.eeting brought joy to the German! public and hope Hitler would score! a bloodless victory over Czechoslo-1 vakla. Hitler's demands for peace- ful surrender of Sudetenland by the Prague government had set Saturday as the deadline. .Word of the Munich get-together coincided with a decline in" talk of German mobilization. The official news agency. DNB, had flatly de- nted reports that 2 p. m. n a. C. S. T.) today was a new deadline for Czechoslovak capitulation un- der threat of German mobilization. (But In London, Chamberlain in- Sfe GERMANY, Tf. 12, Col. 3. GERMANS WERE PRE- tt seemed, wh'en the August war games were succeeded by autumn maneuvers, with reserve unite joining in for the first time since the war. and a million men under arms. Prance called out reservists, too: the English navy got the Sudenten Germans continued lo turn down offers to compromise. n HITLER'S SPEECH at U, storm gates. Boast- ing that Germany was unbeat- able, he said he could no longer tolerate Czech "oppression." Su- djten Germans rioted, Prague declared martial Prime Minister Chamberlain of Eng- land flew to Hitler. Deserted, Czechoslovakia became another step on Germany's march east. 4 IT LOOKED LIKE WAR for a little while In May when Czechoslovakia called out army reserves and rushed rein- forcements to the German bor- in answer to re- ports that Germany was ready to march In. Anyway, Germany made no overt move ,and Czech- oslovak !oca! elections went off with little violence Henlein's party gaining. 5 ENGLAND STEPPED IN late In July with the ap- pointment of Lord Runclman as unofficial mediator between the Czech government and the Sude- ten Germans. her ally afraid that the continuing clashes between Hen- lein's men and the Czechs would give Hitler the excuse he needed to act, Anti-Czechoslovak prop- aganda flooded Germany. Mussolini Takes Mediator's Role Report President Benes' Resignation Is II Duce's Price As Peace-Maker ROME, Sept. Min- ister Chamberlain and President Roosevelt today drew Benlto Musso- lini Into the circle of peace-makers striving to pull Europe back from the brink of war. Chamberlain urged II Duce to use influence with Adolf Hitler against immediate conflict In Europe. His plea, arriving first, brought response at once from who got in touch with the nazt reichsfuehrer by telephone. A personal message a few hours later from President Roosevelt add- ed further urging that Mussolini aid in settlement of the German-Czech- oslovak controversy. Announcement followed shortly that Chamberlain, Hitler, Mussolini and Premier Edouard Daladler of Prance would meet tomorrow at Munich. Wasting no time, Mussolini board- ed a train for Munich at 8 p. m. (II a. m. CST) and departed to as sume the role ot mediator in the crisis. A vast crowd gave resounding cheers aj left with Count Oal- -eazzo Ciano, .his foreign minister and Chamberlain's appeal, delivered by the British ambassador, the Earl of Perth, asked Mussolini to "urge'' Hitler to take part in four- power discussions that would "keep our peoples out of war" over the Sn ITALY, Pt. 12, CoL 3. Parley Halts Europe On War's Brink LONDON, Sept. (AP) was halted on the brink of war tonight by a swift- ly called peace conference of Great Britain, France, Germany and Italy. The four powers, working against expira- ion of Germany's 24-hour suspension of mobi- ization plans, will meet tomorrow in Munich ieeking some peaceful solution of Adolf Hir- er's demands for Czechoslovakia's Sudeten- and by Oct. 1. If any solution of the German-Czechoslovak problem a the big four might go on to wider issues in an effort to achieve a general European settlement. Thus peace, menaced by the ever-mounting millions of men under arms, got at least a reprieve. Prime Minister Chamberlain revealed thii when announced to a tense house of commons that Hitler had agreed to postpone German mobilization for 24 honra from 2 p m (7 a. m. CST) today. v Chamberlain, Hitler, Premier Daladier of France and Pre- mier Mussolini of Italy are to meet in Munich for a peace con- ference, possibly the most vital since Versailles, which yet may avert war over German demands for Before he Chamberlain had sent a last minute appeal to Mussolini to urge peace upon his German Even until he was well into his parliament speech the British prime minister did not know the result of that appeal President Roosevelt in a personal message also urged Mus- soluu to use his influence to keep Europe's armies from march- ng to a new world war, a plea that was credited with infln-Un eleventh-hour B-itish diplo- COSTING FDR'S OKEH EXPECTED ON TWO ARMORIES IN ABILENE Approval ot President Rooserelt on two projected National Guard armories In Abilene, costing Is expected before the end of the week by ranking officers of the Tex- as National Cftiard. General John A. Hulen. retired Texas National Guard commander, and Wyatt c. Hedrlck, Port Worth architect, have been In Washington since Sunday seeking approval of the president on worth of Armories In Texas. The Abilene pro- gram Is Included. Last Free Fair Junket Today One last advcl lising ning Abllene's trade territory u-lll be made today by the Abilene Boost- er's club and the Knights of phyth- ias tn interests of the West Texas Free fair. Two motor buses and a caravan of automobiles will Invite citizens of towns northwest of Abilene to come to (he fair. Last night R. T. Cannon, pub- licity director ot the fair, said that two ne-v entertainment acts would be added to the program presented In each town. A sound [nick operated by the Eheesler Midway organization will lead the parade. Behind the car will be a trailer carrying a baby elephant. Cannon said. At each town the elephant will be taken out and run tnrouyh a repertoire of tricks. The second attraction will te a ,-ouple of c.'owns, Mr. and Mrs. F. Murray of the Shcesley Midway, better known as "Uffo" and "Hap- py." Regular entertainers. Jerry Ab- bott anrt his fiddle band. also be along Jess Fincher. with his siren .'quipped csr. will be in the cara- ian with an official escort 3f highway patrolmen and Abilene police. E. G. Woods, secretary' of the Booster cluo, said last night that a large number of club members and Abilene business men had made reservatlons for the trip, The Knights of Pythias reported Sec TRIPPERS. ft. 13, Cot. 5. The two have reportedly conferred twice with the president and are awaiting an amended Public Works administration application forward- ed to Washington yesterday from the regional PWA offices in Fort Worth. Capt. Frank Hobhs. Headquarters battery. 131st Field Artillery said last night that local committees have submitted commitments to the armory board ana these are includ- ed In those to be approved by the president. According to the National Guard armory project, Ihe armory board will finance 55 percent of the cost of construction and Is asking a PWA grant of 45 percent. At a meeting of the board of di- rectors of the Abilene chamber of commerce last Thursday arrange- ments were made for the sites of the proposed armories. The field artillery armory will be located about a block and a hall south of high school between the same block as the city stand- pipes. It will be a two story brick and stone building. Ho feet square. The combined assembly room and drill hall h to be 80 by 120 feet. Includ- ed in the building will be a gymnas- ium, offices, store room and storage for mechanized units of the artil- lery. The infantry lo be located on South Uth. just east of Sportsman field, will be built along the same lines except that It Amarillo and Meander streets on win be a one story building. Baird Discusses Municipal Plant 500 Attend Mass Meet; C. E. Coombes Of Stamford Gives Principal Speech By C. M. ELMS Reporter-News Staff Writer BAIRD, Sept. M-Thtrd ot a scries ol mass meetings for discus- sions of advantages and disad- vantages of munlclp.il lisht and power plants was held hrre tonight with about 500 Baird citizens at- tending. Judge Ben L. Russell, local attorney, presided. In opening the meeting Judsc Russell outlined purpose of the rally, that of giving facts about the BAIRD, Sept. The cily council was notified today that a of the attorney generals department woulrt livcslijate alleged inter- ference n.r (he West Texas L'tlli- ttrs company with the referen- dum Friday nn i municipal power plant. Avfcta.nl Attorney General Victor Bouldin wiml that the special investigator would ar- rive lonijht. the company's tax" payments have Increased until last year when WTU paid S1.700 In taxes to Balrd and Callahan county on properties In Baird. COOMBES SPEAKS C. E, Coombes. Stamford, former Abilene mayor, was the principal speaker of the meeting. Coombes called the pending bond election p., "Vexation; Question.'' and referred to experiences municipal prob- lems during the four years he was Sec T-f. 12. Col. Nolan To Ballot On Beer Today SWEETWATER. Sept. preparations have been completed for the local option beer election to be held here tomorrow. The election was called by the com- missioners court after it was pre- sented a p2tition by the ministerial association, bearing names of more (nan 10 per cent of the qualified voters ot the county. Fifteen absentee ballots had fcccn 'PEACE MAY BREAK NAZIS SAY Fair Given Use Of Sound Booth Invite Visiting Bands, Singers To Broadcast The West Texas Utilities com- pany has volunteered use of its sound booth nt (he West Texas Free Pair October 3-8 for acknow- ledgement of all territorial delega- tions and for any programs they may desire to present, fair officials announced yesterday. Visiting groups are cordially In- vited to bring along bands, singers or any other entertainers, President D. H. Jefferies said. The broadcast- ing booth will be available any hour It Is requested, he assured. All delegates, whether they have entertainers or not, will be acknow- ledged over the sound system, it was said. Wanda Beth Williams was an- nounced as Sweetwaler's duchess to the Cotton Festival. Meanwhile, whitey Newell, pub- licity man for the Mighty Sheesley midway, arrived in town yesterday. along with Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Mur- I LONDON. Sept. 28 ray. the carnival clowns. Mr. and i British news agency. Reuters, said Mrs. Murray, known as "Happy" I in a dispatch from the Hague that j and -Laffo." will distribute free tickets to carnival rides to Abi- BERLIN, Sept. was a mischievous twinkle In the man's eye. "I hear." he re- marked with Germanic drol- lery', "that peace Is breaking out October first." That was a light-hearted sample of Ihe German public's relief tonight over the bright- est news in unprecedented meeting st the No. 1 men of four leading European powers. Authoritar- ians Hitler and Mussolini and Democrats Chamberlain and Daladier. "That meaas was the almost unanimous exclamation as this writer surveyed public opinion after the disclosure of the Munich conference. Netherlands To Mobilize When Chamberlain found he had met success he told a chew- ing commons "I will go to see what I can do as a last effort." BRITAIN JUBILANT Jubilation greeted the announce- ment thioughout Britain whose fleet was mobilized while the tlon. tcllng as did (he other peoples of Europe, frcnzledly prepared for war. The threatened victim at attack- Czechoslovakia will be absent from the Munich council table, though her minister to Britain, Jan Masaryk. quickly protested to Chamberlain against the fact. So will another power. Soviet Russia, whose millions of man- power had been countet on to help the victim. But Chamberlain only a few months ago declared the peace of Europe depended on the under- standing among the lour powers who will be there and that for the moment was enough to banish the fear of horrifying air raids and gas attacks from the minds of millions. Preparedness measures went on In Britain and however, pending concrete steps toward some peaceful solution of the German- Czechoslovak issue. France called additional reserves to swell the she already has under arms. ELEVEXTH-HOtR EFFORT Chamberlain had said only last night in a broadcast he saw no fur- ther useful step he could take u t, mediator. But he did take one more. He appealed to Benlto Mussolini to his influence with the Ger- man chancellor for a peaceful so- lution. The result was not known as 89-year-old prime minister rose to MBIS, Sept clituUtrt in French par- liamentary circles tonight that I United Statei observer would attend tomorrow's) historic Munich conference. The United States embassy, however, uld it had no knowl- edge of any inch arrangement. The four-cornered peace confer- ence sprang with suddenness from I address parliament saying "we, ara faced with a situation which has no parallel since 1914." In a voice filled with emotion he told how one measure after another his own two dramatic flights to failed to weaken Hitler's determination to take the Sudeten areas of Czechoslovakia at once. War feeling grew among parlia- ment members, diplomats nd others packing the galleries. Then a p'ece of paper was passed along to chamberlain. CHAMBERLAIN PAUSES Th? prime minister paused in 1 his speech to read the messaga See EUROPE, Pr. 13, Col. 5. CHAMBERLAIN HIGHLIGHTS children Ihe Weather cast at noon Wednesday, according to Marshall Morgan, county clerk." Election boxes have been sen', to Icne. Newell and the clowns will the various precincts for the spe- accompany the Booster club mem- cial election. j on their final goodwill tour for County Judge Chas. ten-is stated tfle 'air today. Newell informs that two of the newest carnival rides In America, innovations (if 193B. will be brought the Netherlands government had decided to proclaim a "state of emergency" tatay to "facilitate tiere with the Sheesley midway. They are the Rollo'plane. which I demand or. Its planes. swini-s (he rider around In barrel loops, ar.il crashing scooters. TKVIS bond election lo tic held here Fri- rtay. He asked that there be no dis- coro. Judge Rr.wel! also cited higher j rates In a half dozen other Texas' towns that have municipal power plants and later in the evening pointed out value of West Texas Utilities to Baird for taxation pur- poses. Judge Russell said that tn [1022 WTO paid th; city o; Hatrd in taxes and that c.ich year that the outcome of election will not effect the precincts which are already dry. Elec'ion Judges [or Thiirsd.iv are: E. B. Hull. Swretwatrr box No 2: O. 8. F.idson, Bitter Creek: Luther Ross, Trent: L'Uhfr Finch. Divide: Tyne Dfnnis. Ssvpetwater Box No. 1: John Cave. w. M Grain, i BrOWPWOOd Woman D-rkrr: Ernr.st Wiman. Wastrlla: W. W. Withrrspoon Rosroe: Walter Blackwell: F R. Drnirrn, Canyon; Bascom Hart- srp.vcs. and Jim Haw- kins. Champion. Prime Minister Hcndrikus Colijn announced over the radio that a bill would be introduced In parliament tomorrow providing preparatory measures for mobilization, the Netherlands airline, announced suspension of all In- ternal service because of the heavy Texas Trade Index Grains 11 Per Cent Killed Near Rankin H Storm Aid Asked Sept. 23 Mrs. K, Bocttr'ncr. about 36. of Bro wood. wax liillert seven o[ here in an automobile accident at noon today. Mr. and U A. Me- Christy and Mi5s EMse Fir.dJay. AUSTIN. Sept 2S- ea department store sales and run.' of crude oil tn stills boosted the composite Index of Texas Industry and trace in to an In- crease of nfarJy II points over J-jly. All By The Associated Press Highlights of Prime Minister Chamberlain's address yesterday to the house ol commons follow: And now there is to be one more opportunity to try bjr rea- son of good will and discussion to find A solution of the pro bit m which already U within slffht of settlement. Whatever views we may have had about Premier In the past. I believe everyone will wel- come hts gesture. He has been will- ing to work with us. Sijnor Mussolini hoped Herr Killer would see hts way to post- pone the action, which the rhanrellor had told Sir Horace Wihon wau to be Ufcen at 2 p. m. today (or at least hount to allow him iMimolinh to re- namine the situation and find a peaceful settlement. In re- Hlllrr agreed tn pml- pone mobSluaiinn for 21 hours. M unlll t RV rix, 'I M-t fxlij. 'To Hitler' I cannot believe you wil; take the re.-ponsibiUtv o[ start-1 Ins a world war. which might end civilization, for the sake of a few j factors except miscellaneous, days delay In settling this Ion? j cartoadings and electric standing (Sudeten prob- Sept ,also of Brownwood. were ;aken to a, power consumption Increased above lem. 155 chair- I hosnltal in McCamey July with store salfs and crude He has deep rooted dis- rhe group rclutnmg from'runs cnntrlhutlr.? the major tn- trust and dLibelief in the sincerity fund Norman H. Red man, appealed today for weU in excess of toOO.OOO to- and rehabilitation in the New EYig- land flood and hurricane belt. One or the principal difficulties in dealing with a totalitarian gov- ernment is the of means of establishing contact with the per- sonalities In whose lie the Tina! decision. I therefore resolved (on Sept. H) to go to Germany my- self and interview Herr Hitler and find out in a personal conversation whether there was any hope yet of saving peace. I have no doubt now, back, that mf rtsit alone pre- vented an invasion wHch every- thing had been prepared. 1 had been told at that. If the principle of self derer- mlnation were accepted, Herr Hitler would discuss with me ways and means of carrying it out. He told me afterwards he never for one moment supposed t be abls to come back and the principle was ac- cepted. When I tot bark In Godfs- bfTg. 1 though I had ontv to cuss quitlly with him [Hitterl the vartnus proposals ilrfad? submitted. 1 was shxkcd when, at the Beginning of the conver- these proposals were not acceptable and thit thfre were other proposals which I had not contemplated at all, I bitterly reproached the Chan- California. A tire blew out causing the Btireau o! Business re-, of the Czcchwlovals government, i cellar on his failure to respond in the c.u to turn over and search of ihe University of Texas That h.i.s been one of :he factors in I any way 10 tlie rftnr.'s which I had a roartside embankment. I reported this difficult of evenM. I marte tn secure poaci1. West Texans, Attend The Biaqer And Better West Texas Free Fair At Abilene, October 3 To 8!   

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