Abilene Reporter News, September 28, 1938

Abilene Reporter News

September 28, 1938

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Issue date: Wednesday, September 28, 1938

Pages available: 24

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Publication name: Abilene Reporter News

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Abilene Reporter News (Newspaper) - September 28, 1938, Abilene, Texas President Roosevelt Sends Direct Appeal To Nazi Chief Alone To Continue Negotiations--See Page 12 WEST TEXAS’ OWN NEWSPAPER VOL LYU I, NO. 120. TOje Abilene porter -lottos "WITHOUT, OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRJENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES "-Byron OUM rrtu (IPI ABILENE, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 28, 1938—TWELVE PAGES AitoritM Prru (ACI ★ ★★ EVENING PRICE FIVE CENTS BEFORE WELL EVEN SPUDDED— Promising Oils Fair Park Test ‘Fishing--For Rig The Promising Oil company today faced the prospect of drilling its No, I City of Abilene Pair Park, wildcat oil test projected on the midway of the West Texas free fair next week, with a corkscrew. Application filed with the Abi lene office of the railroad commis sion for the test said that the well would be drilled "with cable tools or corkscrew.’’ And today it appeared that drilling with cable tools may be out of the question unless some kind hearted contractor with an idle rig moves In a spudder before Monday. Predicament of the Promising Oil officials was revealed in a telegram received today by Bob Cannon, director of publicity for the fair, from th Star Drilling Machine company of Akron, Ohio. It said: STAR BACKS OUT ‘Our stock of 45 machines depleted and we have several parties figuring or Abilene stock machine so we cannot use this machine for exhibition at fair. However will be glad to loan you 71 machine for exhibition if you will furnish truck for mounting a. d transport back to Abilene branch when fair closes. No. 71 machine is popular size for both water well work and cleaning out oil wells and would be Interest-    geological    work shows every evi-    it was decided    that the wildcat wil' ing exhibit. While actual drilling i donee of a    "superstructure” beneath I    be drilled with    the corkscrew    unless demonstration cannot be arranged,    its spread    on the West Texas fair    a rig is made    available by    Satur- would raise mast and exhibit ma-    grounds and the test has already I    day. chine running, also have represen- been contracted to drill "to produc- | In the meantime, the Chemi-tative present.'’    1    tion or quit,” it was considered im- | cal Process company of Breck- Since the Promising Oil company’s practical to merely exhibit a rig and j See OIL TEST, Pg. ll, Col. 7WAR IS AVERTED BY FEW HOURSMORAL TO COBBLER S FABLE STRIKES ABILENIAN WITH LIGHTNING FORCE I 'Big Four' Agree I This is the fable of the cobbler whose children go barefoot. Vol Hargrove, 1534 South Eighth, has an amateur short wave radio station, call W5QA, In a seprate house behind his home. Yesterday, at about 7 p. rn., a bolt of lightning struck his aerial wires, zoomed into the radio room and exploded with the noise of cannon Mrs. Hargrove saw' a cloud of smoke puff from the small building, but she couldn't get inside because the door was locked. There was no fire. Vol came home last night to find his radio equipment in a shambles. A porcelain aerial insulator had been pulverized where the lightning entered the house Paper was stripped from the walls "as if moth had been eating on it for a    hundred years,”    Vol    said. Magazines and papers in the room were crumbly and musty. Very little of the expensive equipment was altogether ruined, he said, but “it sure made a mess.” And the moral of this fable? Well. Vol is a radio service man. and he's been telling    people    for    a    long    time how aerial lightning arresters would prevent such accidents. He didn't have any on his own station AMID WAR PLANS- Czechs Await Premier’s Benes Drafts Note to Poles Widening Movement— UNITED STATES ASKS JAPS TO APPEAL FOR PEACE Speech FD's Move for Peace Broadens Cabinet Praises Limits to Which Britain Has Gone TOKYO. Sept. 28—(A*—United I States Ambassador Joseph C Grew today asked Japan to send a peace appeal to Adolf Hitler and President Eduard Benes of Checoslo-FRAGUE, Sept. 28.— (AP)— . vakia. Czechoslovakia rushed final preparations for war and prayed for peace today, awaiting: a radio address by Premier Jan Syrovy. The cabinet decided last night that the premier should speak to the nation today, the name day of Bohemia's patron saint, St. Wenceslas, but the exa.t time of his address was not stated. Grew made his proposal In a halfhour conference with Gen. Kaz-ushige Ugaki, foreign minister. He called Ugaki's attention to Japan send a similar message. The foreign office announced that Ugaki replied Japan "will give the American proposal serious consideration from her own standpoint President Roosevelt s first appeal to and take appropriate measures Hitler and Benes and suggested that I this connection." in POUND DIVES. THEN CLIMBS CHAMBERLAIN LAUDED While troop trains carried additional defenders to the frontiers and Czechoslovakia was blacked out as a precaution against possible air raids, Cardinal Archbishop Kaspar appealed to all Catholics to pray that war might be averted. The nation counted with anxiety the minutes to the expiration of Chancellor Hitler's ultimatum Saturday. The cabinet meeting was hHd behind darkened windows. Ministers studied reports of large-scale war preparations and of Prime Minister Chamberlain’s radio address last night, which a foreign office spokesman said was considered “the last effort to maintain peace.’’ The spokesman said the British premier ‘ went to the extreme limit to which man can go.” NOTE TO POLES DUE Fear of impending disaster brought mast political dissenters, outside the Sudeten Germans themselves, Into a united front behind the government. It was indicated President Benes would send a new message to Poland today on the question of the Polish minority population in Czechoslovakia. A special courier arrived by airplane Tuesday with Poland’s answer to a Czechoslovak note suggesting negotiation of the minorities issue. Prime Minister Chamberlain's address last night created a most favorable reaction here and Czechoslovaks believed it meant British aid was assured if conflict ca me LONDON, Sept. 28— (UPI — Value of British currency fluctuated widely today with every major turn in Europe's crisis. In terms of the dollar, the pound first dropped to $4 81, compared with yesterday’* $4 73 7-8. Then the news that Fuehrer Hitler had agreed to a four-power conference tomorrow brought it bounding back to $471. Stock and commodity markets were closed for the day before the price reversal occurred. Stock and bond markets had declined, while “war commodities” had boomed. Poland Drives Czech Bargain Baird Requests Election Probe Council Wires McCraw Charging WTUCo. With Interference; Mass Meeting Called The Weather ABILENE and vicinity: Partly cloudy tonight and Thurfday. West Texas; Fair tonight and Thursday. Eaft Texas Partly cloudy tonight and Thursday. RAINFALL: 24 hr* ending 6:30 a rn.    Wed    OI    inch Since first of year ...........28 SI    Inches Same period last year ...... 1.1,47    (nchee Normal since first of year    ..19 82    Inches Highest temperature yesterday . .. 9« Lowest temperature this morning 84 TEMPER ATI1 RES WARSAW, Poland. Sept. 28 -(UP)—Poland was driving a hurried bargain with Czechoslovakia today in their prolonged territorial dispute. It appeared that a solution might be reached that would eliminate Poland as a potential ally of Germany rn any war over Czechoslovak minorities. A messanger flew to Prague bearing a letter from President Egnacy Moscicki replying to Czechoslovakia's offer to cede to Poland a 20-mile strip of Silesia inhabited by 82,000 Czechoslovak-1 Poles. Dr. Casimir Pagee, Polish , minister, handed the note to President Eduard Benes at Prague this morning. Its contents were se-I cret. ! The Silesian Poles constituted I the smallest of the minority races j in Czechoslovakia, of which the I 3,500.000 Sudeten Germans were the j largest. Nevertheless. Poland's de-i mand for custody of this minority : had placed it potentially alongside j Germany and Hungary in claims against this war-born republic imperiling the peace of Europe. I An official communique said 1 last night that President Benes of i Czechoslovakia had notified Pres-1 ident Moscicki that he agreed with I Poland’s demands for territorial I revision. The Polish government quickly drew up its terms, which were said to be cession of Te^chen. a town straddling the frontier, and 72 revision of the boundary by a 70 mixed commission, but without a I plebiscite to determine the peoples’ wishes. BAIRD, Sept. 28—(SpD—Alleging the West Texas Utilises company is interfering with the municipal bond election to be held Friday, the Baird city council late j last night sent a telegram to Attorney General William McCraw I urging him to send an investigator to Baird. The telegram said: "We, the members of the city administration of Baird, request that you today send an investigator to prevent the West Texas j Utilities company from further interfering with the electric revenue bond election to be held Friday,; Sept. 30, This Ls an urgent request, please reply.” The message Ls signed by Herman Schwartz, mayor, and J. T. Lawrence, Earl M. Johnson, Hugh Ross Jr., C. W. Sutphen, Ben F. Russell, councilmen. City officials said the company had waged a fight to defeat the bond election in violation of the law and had resorted to rank misrepresentation in a campaign of solicitation to defeat the election. In the meantime, plans were being formulated for a mass meeting called by a "citizens committee'’ tonight at 7:30 o'colck on the west side of the court house. Speakers will be A. K. Doss of Abilene and C. E. Coombes, Stamford. former Abilene mayor; and Marvin C. Nichols, of the engineering firm of Hawley, Freese At Nichols, Fort Worth. Local speakers will voice opposition to the bond passage H. H Monk, district superintendent of the WTUCo., said "more than a score of citizens requested that the ‘other side' be presented and asked that the council sanction the meeting. "The council said it was not interested,” Monk added. $197,252 municipal power plant bond issue by 352 to 84. The Texas Power and Light company serves Comanche. The vote was sponsored by the mayor and city commission. Free Fair Adds To Attractions Worldwide Scope Of Effort Adds To Growing Hope WASHINGTON Sept. 8—<UPi — Expressions of new hope of peaceful settlement of the German-Czechoslovakian dispute coincided today with revelation that President Roosevelt's effort to prevent war had extended almast wo/ld-wide. Confronted with Rome reports that a Roosevelt message had been delivered to Prime Minister Mussolini, the White House acknowledged that one had been. sent. It was a personal communication and the White House declined to publish the text. Secretary Stephen T. Early said: "It was sent In the Interest of world peace.” He refused to say similar communication addressed to Tokyo. But word a1 ready had come' from Japan that Ambassador Crew had asked the Japanese foreign minister to bring pressure for peaceful settlement of Europe's woes. There was only* one gloomy note See PEACE MOVE, Pf. ll. Col. ft To Peace Parley BERLIN, Sept. 28.—(AP)—Germany $ propaganda minister, Paul Joseph Goebbels, tol a throng of Berliners today he foresaw an amic able solution of the German-Czechoslovak dis pule ‘‘within a few days.” By the Associated Press LONDON, Sept. 28.—The electrifying announcement in a stun ned house of commons today tho Europe s big tour—Hitler, Cham oerlain, Mussolini and Daladier—would meet tomorrow in Munic snatched Europe back from the brink of imminent war. Within a few seconds Prime Minister Chamberlain pointed changed picture of the world's prospects for peace in the most start Ming announcement parliament has heard in a generation. General mobilization was postponed for 24 hours while the pre miers of the four great European powers sought a new way to avoi war over Germany's .demands for cession of Czechoslovakia's Sndetenland. Premier Mussolini of Italy accepted the role of mediator between his German ally and the heads of the democracies. Messages from President Roosevelt to Hitler. Mussolini and the government of Japan—all bound in the anti communist pact—figured in the lightning changes of the day. LONDON, Sept. 28.—(UP) -Th* Czech legation today denied rumors that President Eduard Benes of Czechoslovakia had resigned. Italian Troops To Quit Soain It was anounced that Chamberlain would leave Heston airport for Munich at 7:30 a. rn. tomorrow (12:30 a. rn., Abilene time), accompanied by six aides. The haggard Chamberlain himself when he entered the house to make the most momentous speech of his career did not know that the Munich meeting was to be held. His somber speech indicated he thought war inevitable. ROME. Sept. 2*.—(IP)—A bin that broader European problem than the Czech erifts would be eon sldered at the Munich four-powe conference was given, today whe authoritative sources reported Ital ian volunteers had been ordere withdrawn from the Spanish civ war. It was said on reliable authorit as Premier Mussolini left for Mun ich that he had ordered immediat withdrawal of Italian forces fight int with the nationalist army i Spain. Presence of the Italians o .Spanish soil has been the chief ob whether a But a pencil scribbled note handed to him an hour and a stacie to putting into effect th had been half after he began explaining w’hy it appeared war must come changed the gloomy tense house and galleries into a cheering frenzied mass. It was a message from Hitler inviting him as the premiers of France and Italy also were invited—Uo the Munich con ference. Chamberlain,, who had ordered Britain’s mighty fleet, mobilized last night, had made one See CONFERENCE, Pg. II, Col. 4 British-Malian friendship treaty-keystone of Britain’s program fo consolidating the peace of Euro; Reliable circles said further tha evacuation of Italians already ha started. Mussolini was said to have reach cd a decision to withdraw the Ital! See TROOPS, Pg. ll. Col. I COMANCHE. Sept. 28 - Voters here yesterday rejected a proposed 7 p m. 7 a rn 13:39 p.m. Dry thermometer    87    65    89 Wet thermometer    Al    56    64 Relative humidity    21    .38    25 S. Shifts Cruisers WASHINGTON. Sept. 27—(UP) —The navy department said officially today that three light cruisers have been ordered from San Diego to the east coast. Americas Look to U. S. For War Moves WASHINGTON. Sept. 28 —i/ip)— Administration officials expressed tho opinion today that almost the wl.clr of the western hemisphere would follow the United States in any action it might have to take because of war in Europe. They pointed to the cordial readiness with which the presidents of the principal Latin American states followed the example of President Roosevelt in appealing for peace in cables to Adolf Hitler and President Benes. New' attractions for the West Texas Free fair, to begin Monday, continued to be added yesterday and today. Latest addition was a band playing contest in connection with the Royal Cotton parade Tuesday. The ! playing contest will supplement marching competition already scheduled. FOUR ALREADY ENTERED Arrangements for the playing were completed last night, when the parade committee met at the Abilene chamber of commerce offices. The contest is to be open to all high school bands except Abilene and will offer trophies in A, B and C divisions. Trophies are to be donated by the Rex A. Smith, Ray1 Crowell and W. C. Fisher Jewelry stores. Directors of Abilene s college and high school bands will be judges.! and bands will pause before the judges’ stand to play. Ed Grissom will direct the contest. E W. Berry and Dusty Rhoades,! co-chairman of the parade committee were outlining the line of march this morning. They an- j trounced the entrance of another i decorated float, Safeway Stores, and said that with the Abilene bands, ll were assured for the parade and the number would probably be increased to 15. i Local automobile dealers have agreed to furnish automobiles for I the visiting duchesses. King and Queen Cotton will probably ride on the Abilene chamber of commerce float. In the marching division, prizes j of $75, $50 and $25 are being offered the three top ranking bands Bands from Merkel, Roby, Big Spring and Ranger already have entered and j several more are expecter .efore the deadline Saturday. Announcement was made this ! morning that Abilene Christian college day is to be Tuesday instead j of Thursday, as previously sched-1 uled. Don Morris will be in charge i of the program. LINEUP FOR WHAT MAY BE EUROPE'S REAL WAR GAME TSPT With Chancellor Hitler’s announcement to the world that h% will not give up his claims in Czechoslovakia,, and with the Czechs' renewed "no" to his demands. the lineup of nations in event of war began to form. This map shows the probable allies, countries wan diagonal lines go with German}; those with dot.' go against her. Poland demands a part of the Czech nation, but so far has joined no alliance, commies so tar neutral in the quarrel are shown in white, and the center of the trouble — Czechoslovakia — in black.    *    *There’ll Be More to See, More to Do Than Ever Before-At West Texas Free Fair, Abilene, Oct. 3- ;

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