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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: September 24, 1938 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - September 24, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               MEWSMKR Cfje Abilene Reporter IT 1 nn iri t. i VOL. LVII1, NO. 116. OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKE'JCH TOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS ABILENE, TEXAS, SATURDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 24, PAGES PRICE FIVE CENTS BINES MOBILIZES CZECH ARMY WHAT CHAMBERLAIN, HITLER SAID Al GODESBERG 'PEACE OR WAR' TALKS ?ARIS, Sept. (Saturday) Sources close to Ihe foreign ministry said early today Prime Minister Chamberlain had .submitted a new proposal to the Prague government Ihroush the British minister In an effort to save peace. It reported to be a compromise that would permit Gcr-matl troops to occupy part of the Sudeten German future decisions on formal dispositions of territory. The proposal may be renewed tomorrow and the Prague government asked to withdraw lt-s army (rom predominantly Sudeten areas It was said. A spokesman at the Qual D'orsay gave the following unconfirmed version of the Godes-bcrg "peace or war" talks. Adolf Hitler informed yesterday he desired to occupy Immediately the Sude-tenland. Chamberlain refused and sent a letter to Hitler today asking guarantees against such action. Hitler replied with a compromise by which Germany would occupy some sections as a .symbolic, gesture pending formal plan reportedly was submitted to the Czechoslovak government by the British minister at Prague, and was judged unacceptable to (he Prague government. The spokesman said the matter stood at that point when Chamberlain saw Hitler tonight. The foreign ministry spokesman said the British Is expected to appeal to the Prague government to withdraw its army from the predominantly Sudeten regions to remove any occasion for German Invasion. This course was compared to the action of the French In 19H when the French army was withdrawn six miles from the German border. STAVING OFF TALK COLLAPSE- Place New PressurejOn Prague SHOUTING EXPOSITION PRAISES EN FAIR BOOSTERS SWING INTO LUBBOCK TO CLIMAX THIRD TRIP Ky NUINEZ WISCHKAEMPF.K LUBBOCK, Sept. than 50 boisterous Abilenlans swung In- to Lubbock at 5 o'clock this after- noon to climax the third goodwill trip of the week In behalf of the West Texas fair. They shouted pialses of the exposition at all in- termediate points. Trippers declared the excursion Ihe most successful to (fate. Two buses and two cars were filled with Abilene Boosters and other civic leaders, and the reception at all towns encouraging. Hermlelgh. Scurry county com- munity south of Snyder, was Ihe smallest place, visited on the trek, but nevertheless It gave the Abi- lenlans the most roustrie. genuine- ly cordial welcome of any along the line. Between 300 and 400 citizens and school students gathered on the streets to receive the visitors be- fore departing for a football game at Fluvanna. The visit took the form of a pep rally. Bob Cannon, master of cere- monies for the trip, Introduced the school's cheer Mae Ayers, Sally Layman and Lavohn the red and white clad pep squad In turn gave three ringing ratu for Abilene. L. E. Farr and A. C. Bishop, superintendent and principal of HermlElgh schools, respectively, greeted the boosters. Returning the gesture, all the Abl- lenians gathered around the micro- phone and shouted a Irlo of yells for Hermlelgh. Bennie Ruth Garrett, pretty solo- ist with the Jack Free orchestra which accompanied the Boosters, was the hit of the trip, not only with the Abilenians but with listeners along the route. The orchestra play- ed numbers with Bennie Ruth sing- Ing, at all stops. Piano and other Instruments were carried in a pick- Cannon, at the mlscrophone In- troduced D. H. Jefferies, West Texas Fair president: E. G. Wood. Boosters club secretary, and Jack Simmons. Boosters president, at each town. All extended Invitations to the West Texans to attend the exposition. Tye was tht first stop. At Tye. City Marshall D, H. Vaughan of Merkel, and C. J. Glover, news- paperman. Joined the group for (he trip Into Merkel. There a greeting party was headed by Dr. L. C. Zehnp terming, president of the SM TRIPPERS, ?j. 10, Col. 'AT FIRST SHOT ON CZECH France Ready For Mobilization Army Order On Daladier's Desk Abilene Water Rates Raised Need Of Revenue For Schools Is Cited As Cause An ordinance setting Abilens wa- ter rates at JUS minimum for S.KtO gallons, and 20 cents per thousand abos'e the minimum was passed on first and second reading by the commission j'esteriay 'afternoon. The new rates become effective October 1. Rates have been {1.00 for a minimum, and 15 cents per thousand abov- that. The vote was unanimous, al- though Commissioner L. A. Sadler had the city secretary qualify Ills "aye" with th; statement "only BS an emergency measure." "I realize we have to have the money for schools." he declared, "but I do not believe It should be clone this way except as an emergency. The sltua'- Hon should be worked out by in- creasing values. Abilene values are loo low in proportion to the city debt. Eventually, the solution Is to raise the school limit to instead of the present so Sadler de- clared. REASONS FOR INCREASE Mayor 'Vill Hair cited three rea- sons why Increase, fn water rates was made, adding "Not that I can ever want higher rates." He st.tled: 1. Abilene citizens voted SSOO.OOO .See WATER RATES, Pj. 10. Col. 7 CLASHES REPORTED ON POLISH AND CZECHOSLOVAK FRONTIER Two Poles Killed And 10 Injured As Soldiers Fire On Crowd At Teschen LONDON. Sept. 23.....Mt-An tcrpreted the move. change Telegraph company (Brit- ish news agency) dispatch from Warsaw tonight reported fighting on the Polish-Czechoslovak fron- tier. "Reports from Teschen. Silesia, received here tonight declare that there has been fighting between Czech soldiers and the Polish pop- ulation." Ihe dispatch said. "Soldiers fired on a crowd. Two Poles were killed and ten Injured." Tcschen straddles the Polish- Czechoslovak frontier extending on the Czechoslovak side Into area Inhabited by Poles which Warsaw- demands be cedexi to Poland In any partiton of CzechosicvaVis Soviet Tells Poland To Keep Hands Off MOSCOW. Sept. itissla warned Poland today to keep her hands off Czechoslovakia. Vladimir P. Potemkin. first assist- ant commissar of foreign affairs. served notice on the Polish embassy that the Soviet union would cancel the non-ajgreAslon pact with Poland Some observers said they saw In it an Indirect warning that Ihe Red army would be thrown Into action if there should be simultaneous Ger- man. Hungarian and Polish assaults On Czechoslovakia. Others took a less serious view. They said Ihe Soviet union could well afford to make a non-military gesture ot sympathy for Czechoslo- as it does only threatened cancellation of a non- aggresslon treaty. No Frontier Action Taken, Poles Reply WARSAW. Sept. Po- lish government informed Soviet Russia tonight It had taken no special steps on the Ciecholovak frontier. This was in reply to notification by Russia that Moscow would cancel the Russian-Polish non-aggression pact If Poland should invade Czechoslovakia. The government instructed its charge d'affalrs at its Moscow Thousands Of Notices Already Printed, Report PARIS, Srpt. Members of Premier Edouard Daladier's staff tonight declared a general French mobilization would be decreed by the French government "at the first on the Czech-Ger- man frontier." The declaration came close on tht heels of ihe government's re- ception of an official Czech broad- cast of a proclamation by Presi- dent Eduard Benes decreeing a general mobilization In Czechoslo- vakia. These memben of the prem- ier's staff said decree for French moblliiation was on Dlladier's desk tonight needing onlj- the jjfna lures of Presi- dent Albert Lebrun, Daladier his ministers. H was understood the govern- ment printing office already had [had w -.uj HILVI i e any Nation Ordered On War-Time Footing PRAGUE, Sept. first line reserves of the Czechoslovak army tonight were mobilized to put the nation on a war-time footing within six hours by PresidenfEduard Benes The government of General Jan Syrovy, Czechoslovakia's new premier, in addition ordered all second line reserve offices who have nosts in the nation's military plan, to report for duty dutwi, of 22 told to report for was hu Angle-German Talks Closed Hitler Proposes 2-Point Program To Chamberlain GODESBEHG, Germany. Sept. 24 Minister Chamberlain salvaged the epochal "peace or war1' conference with Adoll Hitler today with a midnight promise to put new pressure on Czecholsovakia, menaced and mobil- ized. "Its up to said the hag- gard premier, as he announced he had agreed to make "certain pro- posals'' to the Prague government, now with, a military hero as premier, "I-cannot say it Is he added after i final three hours with the German conference that had been delayed yesterday In deadlock. He returned by airplane to Lon- don this morning to press the Cechoslovaks to agree to these things his bid to keep Europe's mammoth armies from belne un- leashed: I. Cancellation or Ibtlr gen- eral mobilization order. To permit German troop] or the Sudeten free corps Ui march Info the border land which already had been sacrific- ed to Ihe reich by the An5Io- French plan. The Czechoslovaks have bowed to this peace plan but have sworn to resist "invasion." And in the mean- time a new government Is In power tn Prague, the old one that capitul- ated to the French-British proposals having been forced out bv Ihe popu- lar reaction. PROPOSAL The two-point program was Hit- lers "final'' proposal. Reliable Information indicated this undertaking of Chamberlains all that saved the two days of negotiations from utter collapse. This threatened breakdown was nh i! when Chamberlain, after ehe meeting with Chamberlain, after the meeting with Ihe Sudeten land. vf" MW this meanl Hitler clared he must "save" the iut uumoer 01 sudetens in his own way and could anti-aircraft guns for protection of not. uiv. man regular army. 'Our battle is just "It is just to for our freedom and free Czechoslovak lives." DECREE CHEERED It was the word that thousands of patriotic Czechoslovaks had been awaiting. With rush of enthusiasm the nation sprang to arms. Men hurried from restaurants, leaving their meals unfinished. The streets filled with a cheering, husky-throated, citizens. Tnickloads of soldiers began to nimble through the streets. Taxicabs commandeered; street cars were rerouted to facili- tate the mobilization movement. Signs quickly went up advising Prague citizens where find the nearest bombproof jhelter. Automobiles and motor buses sped in every, direct ion with loads of re- serves. Main were darkened p. m. Large electric signs were turned off and tests of blackout air raid precautions started. The British government arrang- ed for a plane to take British clti- ens crat of the country at a. m. tomorrow. They will flown to Poland. RELIEVE TROOPS Fresh troops were sent to several border regions to relieve soldiers weary after weeks of tense frontier guarding. Gendarmerie and soldiers were sent in large number to num- erous border cities, fncludinj Eger and Grasslitz. where Sudeten party members of the Sudeten German leblon (free corps) gained the up- perhand !ast nijht. In Prague sandbags were piled about the burg and other govern- ment offices. Trenches we're being dug about some government buildings, one ex- planation being chat tiiey were for ammunition for a great number of the ent when it ".t "the fflo.t important sad decisive moment ElPaDd s11 your fortune, in defers of run. off thousands of mobilization 1 T'jen vesterday Chamberlain sus- If Polish troops invaded the'harass- bassy to reply "the government was cd republic. at the warning and to Diplomatic quarters variously in- state moreover that protection of the PolUh border was the government's own affair and that the govern- corps organized in Germany. Americans Are Told To Leave WASHINGTON, Sept. American minister at frague, Czechoslovakia, warned Americans today to leave that country. The state department announced that Minister Wilbur J.i FOIIA1 FOP HAY Carr told Americans that at any time it might become impossible LUUML UHl for them to leave Czechoslovakia. He painted out that it was therefore "of the utmost importance that every American citizen j days of "he yeVr should take steps without delay to insure his safety by being technically called a n hour'dav prepared for immediate rlenartnr. notices. The British ambassador. Sir Eric Fhlppj, conferred Itmljht wltK Foreign Minister Bonnet and sources close to the Joreijn minister said Bonnet was "very pessimistic." Some hope of pended a -scheduled with the fuehrer. morning talk government here. Painters freshened up Red Crosses on the rocus of hospitals. Special trains brought hundreds ot additional refugees from the 'ifruc mi tne while at Masaryk sta- lon? distance telephone. tlon, from which trains depart for REPLV NOT KNOH'.V j the East and South, the movement what the new government there traffic was away from Prague, him Is not known. But it was Prague citizens. Including numerous Jews who have liquidated Meanwhile he had Prague on the to' As Sudefens SIGNS UP, DOWN Erase Swastikas control U, the flirt roac gone. roTenun.nl, wwe were thdr rirni. mB day WtoUn, JouTswKHku billboard. Today, with the, the swsstikaj Hungary's Free Corps Marching Reports Of Crechoslovak Mobilization Spread Like Wildfire Through Nation BUDAPEST, Sept. K (JF) News that Czechoslovakia had or- dered a general mobilization spread like, wildfire through Hungary to- night along with rumors that this country snuld do likewise tonight. The ehlef of the forelpi of- fice press bureau. Siet-Telst- vinj, denied the minors ol Hungarian preparations, how- ever, M "fullj unfounded." But 2.000 Hungarian "free corps" men, similar to the Ger- man organization active along the Sudetenlano frontier, were already In motion toward the Czechoslovak border. Urjenl calls to Prajue to- ri Ijh I were refused by Ihe Bu- dapest Telephone exchange with the words, "lines out of order." The mobilization announced over Czechoslovak radio stations finish- ed with a. appeal to citizens to "straighten your bent backs as the ultimate trial has come." "Long live Czechoslovakia, our was the concluding sen- tence. The broadcast order Instructed aPParent 'he premier slaked every 'B on the chance further diplo- i !heir businesses, are leaving town. Kaplitz, on the border ol German; Austria bringing to 17 the total! number of districts in Sudetenland I under military rule. Disorders at I prepared for immediate departure. State department records show that on Jan. 1, 190 Americans in that country, but many c to have departed in recent President Roosevelt conferred with his cabinet today about threat abroad and talked also with Bernard i .Baruch, chairman of the war industries board during the world j Banish declined comment on reports he would head some new economic defense committee. "Those are matters for the the New York fin- "AU that'can say is umii anair ana mat ine govern- every- nwnt was fully aware of 2r lhcse wurc" i on the diplo-, obligations Phipps had Informed Bonnet that' matlc approaches might stave off' MARTIAL LAW EXTENDED Pr1mc "lnister Neville chamber- 'he worst, Martial law wa.> extended in; bin intenclcci to P'a" i Chamberlain and alonj Ine Czechoslo-, to Prague after he leaves Codes- working against time border ror a Polish free corps; berg tomorrow. There has been tal'< for similar to the Sudeten German free i The Czech radio proclamation of of an -elsht day Hitler ultimatum" mobilizaton was picked up in Paris Whether any time limit was Dlac In the Czech language, in on the "memorandum" to vak, German. Hungarian. Ruthcn- Chechoslovakia was a matter of tan and Polish, the languages of' conjecture here Czechoslovakias minorities. But Hitler has made it known he The Czech decree ordered all per- intends to waste little time in hptn sons had done military the Sudetens hein vice to take their posts immediate- ly. Automobiles, private planes horses and even carriages were re- quisftfo -e-1 for service. _...., A" civil aviation was halted. in terms of light and darkness. The Information was placed ur.rier DAY AND NIGHT one of the two that could be a'umlal m cooperation strict censorship. Bonk Debits For Week Increase J-Yom now until the mnter sol- stice, Dec. 22. thp rhus will cet shorter and the nlshts lonjer. The oprnmg day ot waiter will be the. Bank debit, shortest day of Ihe year. Thtn Increase- for the week er.din' March 17 day and night will again Thursday over the preview wef< in be Tne mercury in Abilene yeste disregarded the coming of technically, by fhreatonlnj more to climb to 100 degrees. Forecast for today Is fair and cooler this afternoon. chamber of commerce totaled Allred Will Term As Executive AUSTI.N. 23 _ r.......Governor James v .Mlrrd sr.cctt trOav ..c would not re.-Un. as frequently to a.wime thr of ihe smith Tm  pxcnipt- ort a: from -v.ir- vpiilsnce of He was A. B. 'Her! i who ajrecd wilh John Coatee, lifjuor board supervisor, he wo.ild refrain, iww in the future, from tru1 sa> of beer. mobilization of ail men from to 40 years of age and all officers and non-commlssloned officers of the reserves without consideration to age. The men were (old to pre- sent themselves In specified bar- racks within six hours. Hungarian Army Barracks Filled BUDAPEST, Sept. Hungarian cabinet went Into session last; night after a gen- eral mobilization order In Czecho- slovakia was broadcast and was still In session at a. m. today as rumors circulated this country would take like action. Although the Hungarian mobiliza- tion rumor was officially denied, military barracks were filled with, newcomers who had received orders to report to their regiments at once. The railroad stations were crowd- ed and scenes reminiscent of 1914 were enacted as men bid farewell to their wives, mothers, sisters and sweethearts. Czechoslovak troops across the? border were declared to be busy erecting new concrete iruchinerun nests. Army authorities explained that the unusual numbers of men called to the colors was to fill up "gaps'1 in the army units. Accused Odessan Held Without Bond ODESSA. Sept. 23 -iSpP-Zearl to jail without bond today 3 preliminary hearing before Justice .of Peace J. B. CroW.ey. J. T King, defense attorney. J for a habeas corpus. A.'iison a VI-A: for Al t Mirlln. hi.! former >5 i forriifr Texfl.1: Ls af- home. Ran- and --------------------------------____________________ ......na ci tr.e 'Ivs tA'l West Texans, Attend The Bigger Free Fair At 5re h.ird sit Storm Aid Asked WASHINXSTOX Sept. :j The American Cnvs as'sed ouMie tonight to contribute at least JcOO.COO for the rolie: of swrm. [Ire   

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