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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - September 23, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               IWESTTOCAS'I MUMPER VOL LV1I, NO. 115 OR OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR I.-OES WE swrcn YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT ABILENE, TEXAS, FRIDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 23, PAGES -----------------------------------------------------------------------..-------------------_____________________.-, ur> PKILfc FIVE CENTS Floods And Hunger Menace Ravaged Northeastern Coast Area As Deaths In Hurricane Mount To 450 _. LUBBOCK DESTINATION ABILENIANS TELL 30 MORE CITIES ABOUT FAIR By GARTH JONES a circuitous 30 mile northeastern West Swinging route through................... Texas yesterday, a motor bus cara- van o[ 33 Abilene buslnes men and Boosters told residents of Ihe area about the coming West Texas Free fair. Oct. 3-8. With few exceptions the party was cordially greeted at each al the municipalities by city officials local celebrltes. They did every- thing possible to make Abilene visitors welcome. One and all. (he ietrni promis- ed to attend the fair man; indicated they will wnd duch- essej >nd floats to the Texas Cotton festival and he Royal Cotton parade. The trip was the second In R series of five expeditions sponsored by the Boosters club lo communities within a 100-mile radjns in Interests of the fair. Today a caravan ot buses will leave here at a. m. for Lub- bocx and Intermediate points. The return trip will not be made until after the Abilene Lubbock high school football game tonight. Abtlenlans making the trip yes- terday were greeted at Albany, the first stop, by Miss Ollle clari, secre- tary-manager of the local chamber of commerce, and Homer T. Bouldln, president of Ihe Albany chamber of commerce and recently elected pres- ident of the West Texas County Judges and Commissioners associa- tion. Miss Clark said that Albany was planning to send a duchess to Abi- lene for the cotton festival. At Throckmorton the committee consisted of J. H. Banks, secretary of the chamber of com- merce and Phil Luter. local post- master and newspaperman. A caravan of businessmen will leave there this morning on a trip to boost the Throckmorton county lair, Sept. 30-Qct 1 LARGE CROWD AT HASKEI.L Thronging about (he Abllenlans on the west side of the square, a large crowd of residents at Hasten listened to the advertising and entertainment program. M. p. Van- noy, secretary of the Central West Texas fair association; Ralph Dun- can, sesretary-manager of the See FAIR, FJ-. IS, CeL Benes Calls On Army To Protect Czechs In Crisis Chamberlain, Britisher Urges Order; Second Parley Today G 0 D E 8 B E RO, Germany, Sept. BKnii- ter Neville Chamberlain and Reichsfuehrer Adolf -Hitler weighed the future of Czecho- slovakia today in the of a series of delicate conference! marking their iccond meeting in eight days. Lest progress oj the talks be dis- turbed by Incidents In the republic, Chamberlain followed up a three and one quarter hour session with Hitler ivllh an appeal for "main- taining a state of orderliness." The appeal, seen as addressed to Germans and Czechoslovaks alike, stressed Chamberlain's belief "the first essential" wis "a determination on the part Of all parties and on the part of all concerned to insure that local conditions In Czecho- slovakia are such as not In any way lo interfere with the progress of the conversations." The negotiations tvill continue to- morrow morning and there was no indication how long they would list. (In Berlin a reliable German source reported Ihe conversations were limited to the Czechoslovak- German situation. (The German delegation, tt wai said, expected the British delegation In Ihe second day's discussions to sntalt concrete plans for quick union of Czechoslovakia's Sudenlenland to the fjcl tttt talks will con- tinue tomorrow was taken as Indications Chamberlain hoped to nefotiate settlement of other European problems, For the first part of today's dis- cussion. Chamberlain and Hitler attended only by (heir Inter- preters. I. A. Kirkpatrlck and Paul Schmidt. u Inspector General Jan Syrevy Ms right eye for Russia wOTe" "leading Czech nalres at zborrov in 1317. Later, he took command of all'allied including Americans, on that front. He developed the of his new nation; Is com- pared with fifteenth century Czech hero, Jan Zizka both mustached, short, stocky; both named Jan; both lost eye hi battle; both clever He's 50. Europe marvels at the speed he moves troops. Wife Of Runnels Landowner Dies Mrs. Mfchaelis Rites Saturday BALL1NGER. Sept. 22 _ rs Paul Michaelis, 75, rtfe of a prom inent Runnels county landowner. hsr hom? street here at this Mrs a ttc moon She and her husband were to have celebrated their golden wed- ding anniversary November 1. They married 50 years ago at Round Top In Pavette county Mrs had lived in Runnels county 44 years. She had been a member of the Lutheran church since childhood. Funeral will bo held Saturday morning at 10 o'clock at the family home, but the minister has not been selected. Jennings Funeral home of BaJlinger is In charge of arrange- ments. Survivors are the husband and seven children. They are c T Michaelis of Hatchel. Plo Michaelis of Wingate: Hugo P. Mlcliaelis of London, Texas.. L. W. Michaelis ol Abilene: Linda Echnlder of Driftwood; Mrs, Lula Fillip of San Angelo: Mrs. Hedwlg Anna Davis of Balllnger. Nine grandchildren and a brother, R. s. Schultze of Austin, also survive CZECH PREMIER Legion Elects, Ends Conclave 'Keep America For Americans' Program Adopted LOS ANGELES, Calif., Sept. an all-embracing program designed to keep "America tor Ihe 20th annual convention of the American Legion adjourned today after electing Stephen J. chadwlck of Seattle, Wash., national commander by ac- clamation. Adequate national defense: strict- er immigration laws; continuation of the welfare program; de- portation of aliens; opposition to all 'isms' but Americanism and a re-affirmation of the legion's policy of seeking a universal dralt Jaw In time of war which would draft money, labor and man were voted by acclamation except the universal draft The legion reaffirmed its stand on the care of war disabled and again sought legislation for veteran preference in federal employment. The legion opposed referendums on declaring of war and re-altlrm- Its faith in Uie "wise sale- guard provided in the constitution of the United States.- calling upon the citizenry to resist all attempts to create hatreds between law- abiding components of our popula- tion. A program to combat the use of marihuana was promulgated. Cooperation with the National education association and activity against juvenile wai voted and unlvei-sal finger-piintmR of ill reddrnU in the country was asked. The deportation ot all aliens who have been convicted of a felony was asked and the immediate trial and deportation of Harry Bridges CIO labor leader, "and like aliens'1 was demanded. The Dies congressional committee, seeking to disclose the extent of _.l .._ Ji- va, --------f cists and communists, chairman ol Syrovy Cabinet Takes Control' President Hints New Negotiation On Minority Issue PRAGUE, Sept. 23 (Fri- President Ed- nard Benes early today called on his army to protect the Czechoslovak people against "unfriendly elementi" were attempting to nity toward the government in the tense atmosphere of for- eign pressure on Czechoslovak- ia. INDIGNATION MOUNTS The president's communication to the armed forces came a few hours after a new cabinet, headed by General Jan Syrovy ai premier, as- sumed control of the government. An official communique issued1 after midnight declared the Syrovy government was one of "order con- trolled strength and experience." elements are trying to use this sorrow to arouse a spirit of enmity toward the government but you must remember that in this difficult time the uneasy people look to the army for security." Syrovy's cabinet was formed yes- terday .Thursday) to cope with ris- ing Indignation over surrender of the republic's Sudeten areas to Germany. FRIEND OF SOVIET The veteran campaigner, who was considered friendly toward Soviet Russia, succeeded Premier Milan Hodza. wrose cabinet quit In the face of resentment against the government's capitulation to Anglo- French pressure designed to appease Adolf Hitler. General Syrovy. emerging as the republic's strong, man in an hour of crisis, look over the war minis- try portfolio In addition to the pre- miership. v The only hold-over from the Hodza cabinet was Foreign Minister Kamil Krofta. It appeared certain the army would have greater Influence in dic- I Pollcles 0( lne new regime, which the Czechoslovak people call- ed upon to resist further sacrifices _ Benes described the new cabinet "a Before the cabinet was announc- ed, it was said outside government offices (hat selection of General Syrovy would be offensive to Ger- See CZECHS, Pf. is. Col. I Workman Killed By Earth Slide GLASGOW, Mont.. Sept. man was killed and eight others were reported missing after shift of earth in the east abut ment of the Tort Peck dam this' afternoon. Army ensinpers Mid no damage was done to the dam proper. Millions of yards of dirt was PROVIDENCE, IN HEART OF STORM AREA, INUNDATED Damage Runs Into Millions Connecticut River Passes Major Flood Level At Hartford; Massachusetts And Rhode Island Bear Brunt Of Hurricane By The Associated Press. Nearly 450 persons were counted dead last night in the hurricane which ravaged seven states and moved on to Canada Property damage soared to millions of dollars. Yet the weather bnreau at Washington revealed that toll might have been considerably higher had the storm not veered away from New York City by the barest of margins. The nation largest city, with its scores of skyscraper, and millions of inhabitants, would have presented a target Forecaster Charles L. Mitchell said the "blow" broke records for rapidity of movement and continued intensity, trav: elmg 600 nulwat ibont 50 mile, an hour. The usual speed he said, w 12 or lo an hour. the rtridfe'i MM" "S" hU 1S new threats Amid widespread destruc- tion brought by the storm wsrst to strika that rich and heavily populated section in a people fear- fully watched ever rising streams. HOMES SMASHED The menace seemed particularly Imminent in New England as Illus- trated by the Connecticut river which, at Hartford, already had passed the level It reached In the major flood, of I9J7. Elsewhere, river crests also rose. Hurricane damage was so vast as to be Incalculable. Providence, R. T., was lashed by the storm which Look scores of lives and dirt damage esti- mated in the tens ot millions of dollars to cities and country- side along the New England seacoast. This picture, taken In In the downtown area, shows six feet of water In a principal bulldins, and atuomoblles cov- ered to their tops. (Associated Press WITH FAMILIES IN NEED- Spur Relief In Storm Area Donations Ok'd By Red Cross Roosevelt Orders Federal Agencies To Extend Help COMMUNIST CANDIDATE SETS RALLY HERE SATURDAY NIGHT J. T. Doy Of Abilene Will Preside As Chairman; Permit Obtained For Rally WASHINGTON. Sept. K-'.JI A Red Cross estimate that 10.000 families were In distress spurred In a nationwide broadcast as "a government officials tonight in government of national solidarity" thclr efforts to provide relief, prc- OFFENSIVE TO NAZIS vent epidemics and rehabilitate Befnri. eh. r.Mn.> property the storm-beat- en northeast. Norman H. Davis, the national Red Craw chairman, authorized lo- cal chapters of his organization all over the country to accept contri- butions for relief activities in Ihe area. Although confined by a head _ Nathan Kleban. candidate for at-, Ihe communist inrly In Teias. on the communist) Lauderdale said Kleban would political rally on "point out the men and Brouos for which W. Lee o Daniel is a mouth piece." He is also expected I0 i Katy Executive Burned In Blast Gasoline Tank Car Explodes At Rising Star the federal lawn at 8 o'clock Sat urday night. II will probably ,he [give his analysis'of foreign af" public communist rally held in 1 i Abilene. B. H. Iviudtrdale ot I-------------------------------------------L. I homes. Ereckenridjtf, who wis In Abi- lene Thursday making enta for Ihe rally. Mld he hid rcceled a permit from Ihf city to hold the meeting on th Rep. Bryan Bndbury of Abilene Mid Thursday '.hat he would accept T. Day of Abilene will be an imitation from W. Lee chairman for the program. O'Danici to rome to Fort Worth and Kleban is a San An- discuss legislative problems with Thousands Of homes and cottages Jell Into smashed dreary pita of kindling. Hundreds of palatial yachts and small craft were swamped or destroyed. Public build- Ings were damaged; transportation and communication were halted or crippled. Crops ruined over wide areas. None could a guess as to the number of saVt that It was in tfu high thousands. Prom (he gilded "gold cotat" of tong Island's north and south shores, the suburban homes of many of New York City's wealthy, ta the ancient fishing villages of New England's coast, there was suffer- ing. Hardest hit of the seven states were Massachusetts and Rhode Is- land. The latter reported a total of 223 victims early today. New Yorlt. Connecticut and New Hampshire likewise had high fatali- ties. New Jersey and Vermont es- caped the worst. In Canada. the province of Que- bec had a single death, but much damage. Pood supplies appeared adequate 'or the Immediate future in. most sections, but some Isolated towns in Massachusetts reported shortage. The hurricane which appeared late yesterday to have blown Itself out In the Canadian provinces of Quebec and Ontario, was followed by fire In some cities. A cubic feet gas tank exploded In Providence. Rhode Island, amid the gale, and a 10-hour blaze helped push Ihe total damage ta historic old New London. Conn, to some J4.000.000. Half-isolated Cape Cod. Jutting out from Massachusetts Into the open sea. reported more than a score ot deaths at Us base near the mainland. Connecticut, where the danger of flood was great, reported 1.000 fam- ilies homeless. Troops were put on duly In halt dozen toivns and cities. Among rivers in the east steadily rising were the Hudson, the Dela- rare. the Connecticut, the Susque- hanna. the Chenago. the Mohawk Before nighSfall. In up-stace New York, many families were forced to RI8ING STAR, Sept P. Blount. of Smlthvllle sup- erintendent of the South Teias di- vision of the Katy railroad, waj seriously burned here today when a tank car of gisollru exploded. Btount was standing, with several other railroad officials and work- men, near two cars of the gasollnt that had been derailed three east of here Wednesday. Preparations were being made to remove the gasoline from the IS suggested that fumes from the gasoline may-have been IgrlKea- frxsa the (Inbox of a wrtcklnj train engine. 100 yards away. The acci- dent occured at p. m Blount was under treatment in the RUlnj Star hospital tonight. will be removed to Dallas hla If his condition permits. H. W. Davidson. Waco, train- master for the same division, also standing nearby. He was un- hurt, zeke Waldrop. fireman on the wrecking train crew received minor bums. The gasoline had been refined a local refinery. Enjoin Power Firms In Municipal Votes Sept. W-J-R-The Tex- as Power and Light company Dallas and the Central Power and Ught company of San Antonio enjoined tonight from using their means or assets In municipal Ughl plant election campaigns la 12 cen- tral Teias cities. The suit, filed by Attorney Gen- eral McCraw before District Judge Raymond Gray of San Saba also sought forfeiture of the charters ot the two corporations, which would prevent them from continuing busi- ness In Texas. Judge Gray granted the restraining order on election activities and will consider charter forfeiture petition at a later date. Bradbury Accepts O'Doniel Invitation tront- >nd Troy' N' Irom in' ingi on the Hudson Parade To Highlight Loraine Fair Today Judging Slated At Rising Star in cen- Americans Flee tivities. ordering government agen- cies to provide all possible assist- ar.ce. Major B H.irloe. acting chief; of WPA departed tor Boston to make an aerial survrv preparatory to a pushed Into the lake upstream from i 'Cation piosram. the eiam b  "h lel today conferred with William the stale plan- moving families to places of safely He was Roy for rive years. Kleban attended San Anton.A Junior wherr he wj  "-V..... -r-'ji.'V aO and a brother, R. s. Schultze of tht coirmlttee mlch! !or ariminhtrator had "deciftd American Sfjdent bMy 'J n Austin, also sunive. Investigation continue Itsihlblts at the San Francisco and fly ;rora los Angers to New Eng- Sin -e Mat 1 'S hfrC M Si-u-dai expaslllons to of thcjfOik. admlnis'lraUv'e sMretary ot been on, West Texans, Attend The Bigger And Better Wesf Texas Free Fair" At Abilene; To 8!   

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