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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: September 2, 1938 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - September 2, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               WBTTEXAS' MEWSMKR VOL. LVII, NO. 94 "WITHOUT, OR WITH OPl'ENSE TO FRIENDS OR VQES WE YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT ABILENE, TEXAS. FRIDAY MORN I NG; SEPTEMBER 2, 1938-SIXTEEN PAGES ur> Good OFF FOR BERLIN 'i tJf LjLjLS I tjtul lliLifULilt 1--- -in cmsade Hitler Rejects Czech Peace ProDosal Good morning, llmft for a cup ot coffee! Jft This Is Coffee Day In the Abilene Salesmen's Crusade. Drink If-------------------------------------------- Sudeten Aide Speeds Home After Parley Good morning, Mmft for a cup of coffee! Tills Is Coffee Day in the Abilene Salesmen's Crusade. Drink it; stock up the pantry with a good supply. Those are the two ways in which Abiientam can take note nf the special observance, which will also be on Saturday Two other crusade events lo of today: 10 a. tin j of dry goods merchants to plan further par- ticipation In Ihe campaign. 2 p. of gfoctrymtn lor the ume purpose, Both sessions will be held at the Abilene chamber of commerce, Manager J. E. McKfnzie of the crusade has announced. This by way of check-up on observance of Cracker Dc-v and Dental Needs day yesterday! The morning mall brought from a Midland woman A letter requesting dental supplies for her home. She enclosed a chfck for Five Drowned reiuestlnt denial suppUei her Jtome. She enclowd a chfck far Listing her needs, selected from an advertisement in the preced- I PI I I 1 Ing edition of the Abilene Reporter-News. The drug store Ifl rlflfln Ull to Khlch her letter addressed filled her order pronto. Illl IvUU WUIGIj Annthpr "PrjtrHrallv rlMneri nf ncnfal Of Rio Grande Another druggist: "Practically cleaned the supplies." Another druggist: "The response was startling." "Still another; "Business three times what we expected." Then, about crackers; In four storrs here, I his sign: 'If we fall to luggvsl crackers, take a free." There were no crackers liven ?.way, for tht clerks were on the alert; but it estimated that more than 60 per eent of the customers bought crackers of one variety or another. Another groceryman: "All we could have expected." Another: "Disappointing." He. however, admitted that he had only a small stock of crackers and had made no -.pedal displays. Somebody should have reminded him that he probably got as much out of the Cracker Day observance as he put into it, Saturday is Tie Day, Sunday Is Chicken Dinner Day, and Mon- day Is Mattress Day. Ministers of Abilene are joining the Sales Crusade. Yesterday, they were made honorary members, and Manager McKfniJe hms their lapel buttons and any placards they wish read; for them. And they are joing to conduct a special day To Church Day, on Sunday, September LI. There will be more news about that later. Several more new members were enrolled yesterday besides the ministers. Included were the Swinney Glass and Paint company, H. L, HanLsor, Tom Newman, both wholesale meat dealers; Duncan Coffee company, by R. G. Starnes; Brown Cracker company, Harvey L. Hays, life insurance. JAP STORM LEAVES 99 DEAD, SCORES INJURED OR MISSING Property Damage To Eastern Section Of Nation Estimated At TOKYO, Sept. clearing away wreckage left by a 75- e-an-hour typhoon, tonight counted at least 99 dead, scores Injured mile-an-hi mile-an-hour typhoon, tonight counted at least 99 dead, scores Injured or missing and property damage estimated as high as yen (i2fl non onm Authorities estimated the damage to shipping at Yokohama alone at yen populous eastern section of the nation which of the typhoon between 2 a. m. and S a. m. resumed Afllulttr activity. nation which bore the brunt a near normal ivity. trams and buses wen running and had been Qyhftnl Uliri restored. School authorities said buildings might be kept shut for several days until Inspection for damage. Collapsing houses and landslides caused most of the deaths, but two Korean students were electrocuted as an electric wire snapped and colled around them. The typhoon struck on the 15th innlversary of the Tokyo eath- quake In which 150.000 perished. Winds. leveling houses by the thousands, left an estimated 15.000 persons homeless In Tokyo alone. Thirty-four passenger and freight vessels were driven aground, mostly at Yokohama. Floods added havoc. Police re- ported an entire village of 300 houses was wiped out by floods in central Japan. Most residents were believed to have escaped. France And Soviet Call New Recruits PARIS, Sept. of thousands ot young conscripts- world war "flrmtistic babies" born in out today for frontier training grounds, starting' a move- ment which In four days will swell Prance's standing army temporarily to men. MOSCOW. Sept. Hed army's new class of 1917 and part of for duty today. The aggregate number was not revealed, but the army paper fled Star said 10.000 of them already could fly airplanes and use para- chutes, having learned this, during spare time, as civilians. PWA Puts Brakes On Texas Funds WASHINGTON, Sept. 1. Wl Administrator Ickcs said today Tex- as would receive no more PWA funds until PWA revised its stale allotment quotas. "H already has had more than Its equitable share.'' said Ickes. "There will be no more allocations until we fix the new quotas.'1 College Hunkers May Be Success Father Of Two Abilenians Dies Last Rites For Avoca Farmer This Afternoon STAMFORD. Sept. G. Munzler, 78-year-old Avoca far- mer, died at this afternoon of acute indigestion. He was stricken at his home and lived only a short while. He was the father of Mrs. Ollle Waldrip and Mrs. Delia Wal- drtp, Abilene. Funeral for Mr. Munzler will be held at o'clock Friday afternoon at the Avoca Metrodist church with the Rev. O. F. Gamer, pastor, of- ficiating. The Rev. Joel Grimes. Baptist minister, will assist. Burial will follow in the Spring Creek cemetery with Kinney funeral home directing. Mr. Munzler was born In Gon- zales, August 8. 1860. He married Louise Greby In August, 1885. at Palmer. Texas. He came to Avoca from Ellis county 33 years ago. He had been a member of the Metho- dist church 60 years. Surviving are his wife, one son, Fred of Fort Worth, and four daughters, Mrs. Waldrip and Mrs. Waldrip. Abilene: Mrs. Ella Mc- Claln. Fort Worlh: and Mrs. Net- tle McClellan, Avoca: u grand- children and three great grandchil- dren. PRICE FIVE CENTS WITH COUNTER DEMAND FOR SPEEDY SETTLEMENT- AT AMARILLO AND DALLAS- PLAN 2 VETERAN HOSPITALS Proposal Ok'd By President, Paper Reports Expect Crest In Brownsville Area Saturday By The Associated Five persons drowned in the treacherous waters of the Rio Grande today as the big stream rolled gulfward with its flood bur- den, the greatest In six ytars In the Brownsviile area, where the crest Is expected some time Sat- urday. George Garcia M. and his son, George, Jr., drowned when they attempted to swim to a small Island across a levee brea'i at Los Indlos, Texas. Hundreds of miles to the north- a father and his two daugh- ters perished when a cable on which they were crossing the river 60 miles upstream from El Paso parted in the middle and dropped them Into the swiriing water. They were John Canard, 45; Rose Garrard, 15, and Jewell Gar- rard. 10 Mrs. Garrard wa; rescued by a cowboy who tossed hej a rope and hauled her to safety. LEVEES WEAKENED The river was rising on its lower reaches today, testing the strength of levees weakened by a recent drouth. Two breaks in the levee the Mexican sirle sen; water over 1.000 acres of rich farm land and the break In the low levee at Los Indies Inundated some acreage in that region. The peak of the high is ex- pected at Hidalgo late tonight. Four lateral roads in Ihe Rio Grande valley, In the Hidalgo-MIssion-Mc- Allen under water. Five were opened to drain water from the malr. stream. Federal meteorologists at Browns- ville- slid that unless the levees broke the rich citrus-growing val- ley apparently would escape serious flood damage. The crest of the high water Is ex- pected in the Brownsville area some- time Saturday. W. J. Schburbuich, Brcwnsrille weather observer, predicted the flood would go to 18.5 feet here Flood stage fs 18. U. S. Navy Forms Atlantic Squadron WASHINGTON, Sept. The navy unexpectedly announced today that a Atlantic squadron of 14 of its newest war- craft would be formed Immediately. Without explrnallon, a formal announcement said seven ton light cruisers and seven de- stroyers would comprise the force, effective September 6. Htar Ad- miral Forde A. Todd was designat- ed commander. The nation ha-' l-.M no organ- ized Atlantic force since the fleet was concentrated in Ihe Pacific in the midst of the 1931-32 Sino-Japa- nese crisis. AS STATE'S HINES DEFENSE GRILLS DAVIS ON TRYSTS WITH HOPE DARE private life, protested he was a mar.-icd mar NEW YORK. Sept defense today threw a spotlight on the semi-clandestine trysts of Hope Dare and J. Richard 'Dixie) Davis, the state's star witness in the pol- icy racket trial of Tammy District Leader James .1 nines. Chief Defense Sounse. Lloyd Paul Stryker charged that District At- torney Thomas E. Dewey permitted Davis to visit the red-haired show- girl as an lo turn state's evidence against nines as t co-consplratoi in the multt-milllon- dollar Dutch policy racket'. Stryker bi ought out that Davis made his excursion! to Hope Dare's apartment while he was a some-timt prisoner in the Tombs. The dapper erstwhile "kid mouth- piece" of the Schultz mob squirm- ing under search into his thai while lived with his wife for time years. Davis Insisted that during the visits lo Mls> Dare's aontment he ttas never alone In the. same room with her. "Detectives were always pres- he laid. Besides detectives, he taid, Miss Dare's mother was always present when he stopped it tier apartment (o chame his clothes. DEWEY STATEMENT In a report to Justice Ferdinand Pecora today, District Attorney Thomas E. Dewey corroborated, in advance, Davis1 statement that he visited Hope Dare only tj change his clothes and eat occasionally. Detectives always were present, Dewey said. On every occasion he was re- leased to see his doctor, Dewey said, Davis actually saw him, but the treatments he received caused "ex- cessive perspiration" and "a fre- quent change of clothes was neces- sary." Davis testified all clothes I at Miss Dare's apartment. Slrjker questioned Darli about his confessed perjuries. Daris, unruffled, admitted all, though he remarked hr was protecting others when he swore falsely. Strjrker suggested thai he hid double-crossed several policy bankers who were his clients in the days before Schultz com- bined all policy banks into a KO.OOO.OOO-a-Ttar racket. But Davis blandly denied it And when ironically asked when his "moral regenera- typified by his desire to tell the truth as a witness against Hines, had set in, Davis said, "The moment I had determined to tell the truth." HE 'SINGS' Violent Canadian Storm Kills 1 1 QUEBEC, Sept. (Canadian A violent early morning storm caused II deaths and exten sive properly damage today In the Nazis Take Over Austrian Schools VIENNA. Sept. j and other private schools ot Ger- man Austria will be closed Sept. 19. It was announced today, and the state and the national socialist (nazi) party will take over the edu cation of youth. The newspaper Vocltischer Beo- bachter, making the announcement, said Ihe closed schools would be re- placed by a "German upper for boys and girls. This, the news- paper said, would be the predomin- ating type of higher school for Ger- man Austria. eastern part ot the St. Lawrence river valley. Four tenants were killed, a s boy was mls-sing and a dozen sons were injured by a rain- loos- ened avalanche which destroyed an apartment house. Waters of the Hooded Portneuf City Asks Land Suit Rehearing Jurors Award Owners In Airport Case City Attorney Edmund Yates said yesterday that the city of Abilene J. Richard (Dixie) Davis "kid mouthpiece" of the, Dutch Schulti multi million dollar policy racket, said in court that he paid money to James J. Hints, a Tammany chieftain, on trial charged with being the "political front" for the New York racket. Davis is shown as he entered court. (Associated Press Hear Testimony On Jones Tract Commissioners Indicate Report Friday Morning ANSON, Sept. l.-A special com- mission, of three men, appointed by County Judge Omar Burleson, to- day heard testimony in the con- demnation suit of the city of Abi- lene against J. W. Lindsey and others, owners of a tract of 150 acres In or adjoining the Fort Phan- tom Hill reservoir. At conclusion of the day's hearing the special com- missioners adjourned without mak- ing a report. Indicating at the time that their findings will be given Judge Burleson Friday morning. The city of Abilene had sought to buy 76.< acres of the land but had been unable io agree with the own- ers on a purchase price, necessitat- ing today's Testimony presented by owners of the land indicated they will ask MO p-r for the portion of the tract wanted by the city of Abilene, plus damages for remainder of the 150 acres. Edmund c. Yates, Abilene city at- torney, and Mayor Will W. Hair re- presented the plaintiffs in the con- demnation hearing. Action Is Taken On Vet Board's Recommendation DALLAS, Sept. 1. The Times Herald In a special dispatch from Washington today said two new veterans administration hos- pitals. Instead of the one originally planned, would be built in Texas, one In Dallas and Ihe other in AmariUo. I The dispatch said: "The hospitalizatlon board of the veterans administration recom- mended the two new hospitals to the president nearly three weeks ago and the president accepted the recommendations Tuesday during a conference with Veterans Adminis- trator Frank T. Hines. "The president announced his ap- proval Of the plan at his press con- ference, but did not disclose the nature of the recommendations. The veterans administration Is still withholding public, announcement, pending completion of minor tech- nical details, but Is expected to make the formal announcement within the neit several days. TO BOOST FUNDS "The two locations were recom- mended after exhaustive survey of various sites in nearly all parts of Texas. It waj in line with the administration's policy to give hos plUl facilities to veterans in North and West Texas. original allotment of funds for the new hospitals was Thta 5s expected to.be iubatantiaUy Increased to proiide for the two structures. It was reported tha this entire amount mar Amarlllo and another sum, o: approximately equal allotted for the Dallas hospital." Announcement To. Be Made Soon WASHINGTON, Bept. 1. Definite announcement is expected in two or three days on the dis- position of the PWA allo- cation supposedly set wide for veterans' hospital in Texas. A good but unquotable source said that the federal board of hospital- Ization had recommended that the fund be split between two hospitals, one at Dallas the other at Amarillo. General Htaei, refusing- to com- ment said an announcement prob- ably would be made In two or three days. Fort Worth Firemen Crushed To Death PORT WORTH. Sept. 1 Tw motion for rehearing in its suit for condemnation for 10 firemen were killed and one ll land for of the was injured today when a wall col- munlclpal alrport' i 'apsed thsy baUled Za'u" in the day a county court i Jury had awarded Louis S. and John were CaP'- Oscar C. Wise, owners ot Ihe track as payment in damages lj. a jury of viiw had valued the Thlfl picture, transmitted by radio from London, shows Sir NevHe Benderscon, British am- bassador to Germany, as boarded a plane for ed with what Informed persons said was authority to warn Ger- many anew In vlgorom terms that Great Britain might not be able to remain neutral X war came in central Europe. (Auo- Washington Silent On Cardenas Talk WASHINGTON, Sept. 1 Officials studied press reports ot President Cardenas' speech to the Mexican congress today refusing Secretary Hull's request that Mexico cease expropriation of American agrarian lands. They awaited an official text be- fore commenting. Skylight Falls, Worshipers Give Thanks In Earnest Rome Banishes Post-War Jews Allowed Six Months To Leave Country ROME, Sept. Italian government today ordered all Jews who have established themselves in Italy since the world war to ge out of the country within sis months. The decree was approved at cabinet meeting over which Premier Benlto Mussolini presided. It applies lo Italy, Italy's north African colony of Libya and th Aegean Isles, but not to Itatiai East Italian Som- alilanl and Ethiopia. This omission presumably Ethiopia, which Italy annexed May 1936, open to ths banished Jews If they are not able to get into other country. Definite Information on the rmm ter affected was not known bu estimates placed the figure mon than 10.000. Italy's total Jewish population has been estimated at about 44.000 The order also revoked Italian citizenship conferred on Jews since Jan. 1. 1919, and prohibited ad- dltlonal Jews from settling In Italy It provided that If those affected river swept away a frame house at Portneuf. drowning five. The engineer and fireman of the Montreal-Quebec night express were killed when the train hit a washed) -i 'awarded ptr acre damages on out culvert east of Portncuf. Ihe Weather land at IPS.! than SoOO and the city- had built a runway onto the tract. The jury found the Ian.-, talten to be worth S150 per acre and also lo-acrc tract separated from the remainder of the estate by removal of the 10 acns. nrtlv Held For Trial Cain, about 60. and Pvt. Ed West moreland. E. E. Carr. another fire-J man. saw th- wall topple and ran but suffered a fracture of his left' foot. J. H. Renfro. W. a mechanic ati the garage, escaped the blaze by' jumping from a second-story win-1 dow. The garafe building, the quarters of two other business establishments, j and a vacant budding were destroy- ed. i ALTCONA. Pa.. Sept. heat caused the conjrega- tlon or the First Baptist church to move last night from the main auditorium to the base- ment for prayer services. Fifteen minutes later A 300- pound stained glass skylight crashed to the floor of the auditorium. The 130 persons resumed (heir Interrupted services with a prayer of thanks for their es- cape. MocFodden Unhurt In Plane Crackup Von Ribbentrop To Confer With Fuehrer Today BEBCETESGADEN, a e r- 407, Sept. OAK wurcei tonight reported Konrad Henlein, leader of Czeehoilovakh'j Germanic minority, had departed by for bearing AdoU Hitler's rejection of an import- ant pirt of Czech peace plans bnt earring new counter-pro- TRUCE SPURNED Hitler was undented to have re- jected the part of Premier Milan Hodza'j "pljn No. 3" calling for three-month truce In Czecho- slovak-German negotiations to per- mit passions of the contending par- ties to down. The retehtraehrer'i peilUm, reaehri after a conference with Renkin an< hlinest nail offl- etala, wai HM to be ttat a non mmn jolntion of the tanger-franght Sudeten minor- U; question wu desirable. What nmter-prapoauf Ren- Ida tarried irtth Kim todecho- remained a mutor. Conferring !rits Hitler and Hen- lein at the Bavarian mountain retreat were Reid Mar- anal Hermann W.lhe'jn Goerinf. Minister Paul Joaeph Goebbels and Rudolf Heu, deputy naij party too of toe. nail hierarchy. Britain's ambassador to Germany, Sir Nevlle Henderson, wai tjricihia; the tame deeho-Germui prob- lem with Foreign Minister 'nifntm Blbbentrop. wxM i feicaee 
                            

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