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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: August 27, 1938 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 27, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               WESTJEXAS' MEWSMKR Abilene Reporter T, OR OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT VOL. LVIII, NO. 88. ABILENE, TEXAS. SATURDAY MORNING, AUGUST 27, PAGES PRICE FIVE CENTS FD And Farley Seeing Eye To Eye-As Usual' Report Jim For Militant Speech Against Tydings HVDE PARK, N. Y., Aug. Roosevelt, alter dis- cussing wtih James A. Parley his drive afciilrul anti-administration democrats, told reporters today Ihe two siw eye to eye on the genera! political situation, In, response to a press conference question, the chief executive auth- orized this statement: "We were In complete ment, as usual." Mr. Roosevelt placed tome emphasis on Ihe words, apparently giving an In- direct reply to reports the post- master general opposed his In- tervention In slate democratic primaries. Parley talked with the preslden about the political situation in ai states where the new deal ha. something at stake. These Includ Maryland. New York, Georgia South Carolina, and Idaho. It was reported Farley urged th president to go into Maryland with a fighting address against Senato Mfllard Tydlngi, new deal foe wht is opposed for renomlnation by Rep resentative David Lewis, adminls tratlon stalwart, The president has condemnet Ty dings and has said kinds word tor Lewis. In New York, the president has criticized Representative John O'Connor, chairman of the power house rules committee. At hi conference, Mr. Roosevelt wa tola that New York communists had endorsed James H. Fay, O'Con nor's opponent. The president replied that com munlsls could not vote in the dem ocratlc primary. SUPPORTS HOPKINS The president backed up the re cent stand taken by Harry Hop kins, his relief administrator against collection of campaign funds from WPA workers. "I very much the prei- Ident "that people on re- lief will not contribute any money for the purpose of ald- Iny any party.'1 A reporter asked the president views on a plan reportedly unde discussion in California to give wwklv pension to every per son over 50. Mr. Roosevelt recalled his recen speech o-. social security, In which he said: "In our efforts to provide secur- ity for all of the American people, let us not allow ourselves to be mis- led by those who advocate short- cuts to Utopia or fantastic finan- cial schemes." O'Daniel Roots For Election Of Picked Slate UNITED WE STAND-DIVIDED WE FALL'- GOVERNOR-NOMINAIE PUTS POLITICAL POPULARITY ON BLOCK; TEXAS WAITS OUTCOME Endorsements AUSTIN, Aug. (ff) Governor-Nominate W. Lee O'Daniel, the hillbilly Sir Gal- ahad who dumped "profasston- aj politicians4' In the dust a month tilts his lance against them again tomorrow In Texas' run-olf democratic primary, O'Daniel isn't running this time but he has put his polit- ical popularity on the block by endorsing six run-off candi- dates who have served an av- erage of 20 yeans in public af- fairs. Two weeks afler he bowled over a field of 11 veteran pol- iticians seeking the democrat- ic nomination for governor, O'Daniel stirred up a hornets' nest by pulling his stamp of approval on six men his oppo- nents quickly chaffed weit "professional politicians." He took to the radio almost daily to persuade his voting supporters to elect men who were best qualified to help him put over his program which included pensions to all over 65, and the Industrial- ization of Texas, These six were Lieut. Gov. Walter Woodul, seeking the attorney generalship, 20 years In public life; C. V. Terrell, after reelection to the railroad commission; Coke Stevenson, veteran speaker ot the house campaigning for lieutenant governor; Bascom Giles, seek- ing to displace W. H. McDon- ald as land commissioner; Richard M, Crltz, for re-elec- tion to the state supreme court, and Harry N, Graves, for re- election to the court of crim- inal appeals. platform in- cluded the Ten Commandments put the clincher (In his own words) on the ar- gument by citing Christ, the federal government and Tex- as' "best James Ste- phen as hLs preceptors. O'Dinlel frankly admitted (hat many of Ms supporters were angered first by what thought was meddling in their rifht lo vole they chow. Rut yesterday he said' "thousands" of letters and tele- grams showed counter trend had reversed "when the true facts" came to light. Most of the angry buzzing, he charged, was created by "the same old bunch that got defeated" in the first primary, "We have positive he said, "that the same people who worked so hard for the other candidates for governor x x x are the very ones who are doing the whispering and trying to stir up dissension amongst our own, loyal sup- porters, x x Their next point of attack Is going to be at the 'state party) convention, x x But let them crack their whips." All of Texas waits lo see how thr whip-crackers fare in O'Danlet's first acid teal berominjf governor-nominate. LAUNCHED BY PEP TALK- Local Salespeople Take Field In Crusade Today Dallas Speaker CONFESS SLAYING FOR ROBBERY In Razor Death ASPERMONT. Aug. verdict of suicide was given this afternoon by Justice of the Peace E. B. Patter- son following an Inquest Into the death of H. T. Carlisle this morning at his home five miles north of Pea- cock. Despite efforts of his son to pre- vent It. Carlisle slashed his own throat with a razor us he apparent- ly prepared to shave. The son. P.ay deep cuts on one hand. Mrs. Carlisle entered the room where her husband was preparing to shave about 9 o'clock and dis- covcrwl his Intent. She screamed and Ray Carlisle attempted to wrest the. razor from his lather. Also In (he house at the time were Mrs. Eddie Jay of Hamlin, daughter. and Pete Trammell. the Carllsles' hired hand, and his wife. The elder Carlisle, about 60. was owner of the farm on which Stone- wall county's first producin? oil well was drilled in only a few days ago. Since completion of the oil well These two. Mrs. Jean Brooks 23, Bizabethtowji. Tenn, and Mrs. Beulah Honneycutt. 25. Johnson 'City. Tenn., were charged in Ealrfield. 111., with murder for the death of Felix Shannon, Mount Erie farmer. Bolh confessed Ihe slaying for robbery. Sheriff Ernest Burkett announced. Shannon was shot through the head. (Associated Press ARAB REPRISALS BREAK OUT IN JAFFA AFTER EXPLOSION Bomb Blast (n Crowded Market Square Kills At Least 20 Arabs, Wounds 74 JAFFA, Palestine. Aug. seethed tonight with racla! hatreds fanned to violence by a terrific bomb explosion In a crowded vesctable market At least 20 Arabs were killed by the blast and 74 wounded, ten of them gravely. Reprisals Immediately broke out as Arabs sought revenge for the bombing. Two banks tvcre attacked, with wild rioting a result. Shops were fired. Jews stoned and shot lied a strike throughout the Holy Land In sympathy with the In protest to the ROV- i protest to the go1 the British-mandated Arabs ca victims and eminent of territory. All business in this seaport city was suspended and an indefinite curfew Imposed. Oil Firm Moves Branch To City Strategic Location For West Central Area Says Head Abilene will become the home ot new independent oil company Sept. I when the Lawson Petroleum company moves Its wiclhU Falls office into the Mlms building here. The announcement was made Friday by Edward c. Lawson, Tul- sa, Okla., operator and head of the firm, who Is In Abilene malting preparations for the transfer. "Abilene is strategically lo- cated for the direction of activ- ity In the West Central Texas- area." Lawson said, "and Is in the center of one of the most active shallow Held plays in Texas." Lswson said his firm had recent- ly added several wildcat drilling blocks In Oils area to acreage ready held teat number of wildcats will be drilled. Contracts have already been let for two of the tests. In charge of the Abilene office will be Seth Cock'rell, who Is con- nected with the legal and land de- partment. He will be moved from Wichita Falls. FieJd man will be F. H. Hunter, moving from Gra- ham. DRILLER IN AREA Lawson has drilled several wild- cat tests In this area and owns a small shallow pool north of Balrd in callahan county which he ac- quired seven years ago. A recent test was drilled west of Rule In eastern Stonewall county. The company was a pioneer in the Nowata shallow field in Oklahoma, holding production there since 1903. Production is owned in north Texas in Wil- barjer. Wichita. Archer, Young and Jack counties. North Texas as well as West Central Texas activity can be di- rected from Abilene, Lawson said as reason for the move. He will also be nearer a ranch he owns near the Kickapoo headwaters south and west of San Angelo. Latrson's first test will be drilled about four miles north of Abilene, near the Taylor-Jones county line, to spud in about a weejt in the W. W. Sills survey. Another will be spudded In about two weeks east of Anson In Jones county, the No. 1 Bennett in section 42. OAL sur- vey. Both will be 2.300-foot cable tool tests contra c te d by T. L. Wheel- WOULD TAKE GOLD FROM JAP DEAD TOKYO. (Correspondence. of The Associated Press) In the opinion of a group of Jap- anese dentists, even the dead should contribute In Japan's scramble for gold to carry on the war in China. Alumni of the Japan col- lege of dentistry suggested a dentist be assigned each cre- matorium to remove gold fill- ings, plates, crowns and teeth from bodies. They recently laid the gov- ernment about yen in gold goes each year Into graves or cremation urns. Carlisle was regarded as In wealthy circumstances. Relatives said he had been in de- clining health several years. His wife was to have taken to the hospital Ihls other survivors are two more sons and two more (laughters They are Marvin Carlisle. Robv banker; Mrs. Sam Apple'on of OM Glory. Mrs. Herman Kulscv of Stamford, and Howard Carlisle. Arab shops were closed also In Jerusalem and Haifa, both Arab strongholds. Snipers midway be-' twccn Jaffa and harried auto traffic, taking pot shots at pawing auto-, and stoning them. Troops were rushed to all danger Armored cars took posilions legionnaires To Conclave loday Members of the Ameriran Legion, the Lczlon auxiliary and vSons of the Legion leave today for in Jafla's main street while marh- i lin where they win attend three-day sta'e convention. er. who is moving machines from Wichita Falls. In Hamlin Carrier Is Named Treasurer the WASHINGTON. Aug. 2S_ Raymond H. Combs. Churchvllle. N. Y.. was re-elected president to- day of the Rural Letter Carriers association. Lelar.d JI. Tropical Storm Hearing Mexico Hurricane Due To Strike Coast This Afternoon NEW ORLEANS. The four-day old West Indian hur- ricane was traveling toward the Mexican coast today, the weather bureau said, while a record 100 de- grees heat wave sizzled through Gulf coast section. The afternoon advisory timed 2 p. m. (Central Standard placed the center of the disturb- ance at noon about 100 miles west- northwest of Progreso. Yucatan and about MO miles nearly east of Tamplco. Mexico. The storm was reported moving nearly west-northwestward H to 16 miles an hour. The bureau fore- cast that If the present course con- tinued It would reach or aooroach the coast between Brownsville, ex- treme lower Texas, and Tamplco. Mexico. Saturday afternoon. W. F. McDonald, principal me oroloRist of the New Orleans weath- er bureau, said the storm this aft- ernoon bore little or no danger to Ihe middle gulf coast but mijht cause some rough weather around Brownsville. The storm Is severe with hurri cane winds near center and gales over a considerable area, the weath- er bureau said. Caution was advised "all inter- ests in path of storm" and "smaT craft should not venture far Into western C.ulf of Mexico until fur- ther notice." Attorneys Hired For Condemnation Suit The Anson law firm of Thomas _ and Thomas was engaged yester- MOTHER CHARGED Ignites Fervor Turn Out For Big Rally In Auditorium Ringing; words of a major sales executive last night ignit- ed enthusiasm of an audience of more than salespersons who will put that fervor to in. "tial test today in the opening of the Abilene Salesmen's Crusade. SIX-POINT FLEDGE Sales forces ot all participating 'urns Jammed the main floor of the high school auditorium to hear a stirring discussion of the crusade Ihey were about to enter from W. V. "Smoke" Ballew of Dallas, gen efal sales manager of the Dr. Pep per company and president of the National Bales Managers associa- tion. The big rally officially set off the iside. Today, the salespersons of stores in (he city will for the first day endeavor to fulfill the sii- polnt pledge designed to stimulate Mlej create jobs. Each employe of participating firms haa pledged himself to help make jobs, to maie 10 honest each flay to make sates, to 10 people to buy each day, and to buy one more Item himself when he is purchasing. In hli pep talk lut night, Ballew took the old proverb, "A Journey of miles with One and made ap- plication of II (o the talesmen's crusade. He advanced the theory that "safes mem IQDJ, jobs mean prodacUon and produc- lion meani In In goods and ser- and added: "In thlj nj we will aolve our economic illi." Ballew observed that "since 1919 the United states has been in an economic by one long, continuing depression that is still with us. And It is not an act! of God, but was man made." he added parenthetically. He refuted See CRUSADE, Tf. 10, Col. 5 Mrs. Lillian McKmzie Vol- (above) of Los Angeles was indicted on a, manslaugh- ter charge son died of a ruptured 'appen- dix. It tra.t charged that tha mother opposed an operation, Insisting on a "prayer cure." (Associated Press Nominee Says Terrell And Critz Follow On Broadcast FORT WORTH, Aug. 26 Beaming: W. Lee O'Dan- who already has tasted the of political victory, rooted hard for Ms six run-off primary favorites tonight in a radio speech aimed at the 166 democrats who voted for him July 23. TURN OUT More than 7.000 persons to heir the hillbilly governor-to-be plud for the election of six men he endorsed a tew weeks ago for the six highest remaining state offices. He Invoiced the policies and philo- sophies of Jeius Christ, all the presidents of United stares. former Gov. James HORg and Ab- raham Lincoln as excellent reasons why an harmonious slate should go Intc office with him, January 1. To the platform In Marine park with him came Judge Richard Crttz, seeking a supreme court place, and C. V. Terrel. candidate for reelection to the railroad com- mlsifon. These men have OTJaniel's endorsement and as soon as he left the air they broadcast their final election pleas. O'Danlel's part in the broad- cast was umbel; timed. He rirwj 7.-M p, m, took to the air TU two Texas broadcast tpoke for exactly 15 minutest and left, dlwppejrtaf into the crowd. Many of his listeners left is he did. The governor-nominate drove home Abe Lincoln's fateful phrase. "United we divided we on the eve of tomorrow's election Walker. Waukornis. okla was elected vice president; and William L. Fletcher. Jr., Ham- Wheat Formers To Discuss Insurance County Knox Parr has call- ed a mcctin? of Taylor county far- mers .at 2 o'clock this afternoon In the county courtroom. Purpose of the meeting is to hear a discussion or the wheat insurance program by W. M. Deck. dMrict wheat ic.'tirancc supervi-or. Wheat in all-JcwiJh city or Tel Aviv. I The blast and casuins violence nlle leam 'omPosed of members of J raised IT almost; She Abilene Sons of the Legion will 300 Holy Land's casualties be shooting Tor a state champion- ship. The team made up of Doc Smith. Robert Redden Jr.. Phillip Schullz Jr.. Leon Boyd and Marshall by the city of Abilene to as- sist the corporation attorney In the condemnation suit involving approximately 75 of the Und- ser lanri in Jones county. The case sn for hearing be- fore j Jury of view in Anson Sep- tember I. land i; sought by the city Girl, 12, Charged In Father's Death WASHINGTON. Aug. 36 12-year-old school girl was charged today with the staying of. her father whom she accused. Pros- eoitor James C. Bane said, of mis-1 treating her and of abusing her mother. Bane said the girl. Irene Giricz of a nearby mining (own. charged with murder in an information (li- ed by county detectives, described sneaking up on her father. Steve Giricz. 53. and shooting him In the bark of the head M he ate break- fast yesterday. Wanderer Found since 5 when a new chapter in terrorism started when a Jewish s was fired on. Cartridge Explodes In Child's Hand A blari's .22-calibre the hands of William I.rv Baack, proved a dan serous ves- I'he Weather ARII.KNF and CUMBERLAND, WIs. An? Barbara Graf, 34. who i is a part of th- Fort Phantom HIM Rendered northern Wisconsin's des- ispoVe f j reservoir basin, tht fanri needed to j Thomas and Thomu will receive, "wasn't wanted at home.'' was found a fee of but physically sound. See RALLY. 10, Col. 5 Politics Talked At Lawn Rally Miller-Davison Rivalry Nearest To Fireworks By RAT DAVIDSON LAWN, AUJ. ot this town heard more about politics to- night, as candidates and representa- tives of candidates said their last words In the current, campaign. The all-candidates' rally replaced the usual election-eve party In Abi- lene. Arrangements were made by Mayor A. J, Albro of Lawn, and County Judge Lee R. York presided. Nearest thins t" firefforiu eame In the rivalry between Otii Miller and Howard Divlson for district attorney. Darison, speik- Ing Tint, attacked MUltr'i rec- ord bjr wyiiu lhat the preen! district attorney had iron only S5 contested cases during hli tenure in office, while SU had been filed. "Three hundred and forty-fire of the caus filed while Miller hxj been In office are still on the docket, undis- posed declared Davison. Miller referred the Toten to his written and un- in Taylor county. He also challenged Ihe ralidity of records published by Dartam in a circular, sayini that the records therein were not certi- fied by proper authorities. At Ihe conclusion of the program Jackson, Hamlin minister and Khool teacher at McCaulley Davison's behalf, again I the last tract of: olile brush halt starvlns. jcrltlcUiir.g Miller's record Mllltr re- complele the site, i for 33 days because she Wt she! plied, clUnj his record as district repeated many of the reasons he previously nu given for wanting hts six run-off candi- dates nominated, but he struck a slightly different note In a plea for the undivided support of bis ad- regardless of whether he had mane a mistake or not "Thb (nut epbode Is not the main he nld. "It la only Incidental. The auln lane la pavlnf Ue old age fnuions and doing other which I advocated during tie campaign. And I want to point rat to yoa that In order to >c- eomplbh our fun parpen, nul itick together. "United we divided we fall. If I have made a mistake it Is bad. but IT you folks who voted for me tolerate my first mistake, and in trying to spank me you prov to our opponents that we are split up and not a majority of as we were on July 23 you will have postbly made a bigger mistake and to prove It I want to quote to you from the Dallas News of August JI as follows: "x x Defeat of all six OTDanlel- endorsed candidates would be a stunning blow to the democratic nominee even before he had been See O'DAXIEL, Pt. 10. 4 Smith Speaks At Christoval Meet 3 AN ANQELO. Aug. Approximately 1.500 old settlers ot Tom Green county and friends in annLal reunion at Christoval loday heard Lon A. Smith, railroad com- mission, compare their faith to that ot Abraham and Ignore their politics completely. After a barbecue old timers ejected W. D. Holcombe of San Angelo president. Frank Van Horn of Christoval, vice-president and reelected Mrs. C. H. Rsu, secre- tary; Mrs. Robert Austin, enroll- ing secretary; J. W. Johnson, treasurer, and the Rev. J. C. Young, ctiaptiln. Congressman Charlej S. South of Coleman was among the speak- ers. Accr.mparyin? th2 team be Allic O'Bar and Rob'rt Rodden Sr. members of the local pos; The local mombfrs be boost- ins Larry tor national com- mirffpman from Teva-. Oanlci and Mrs. Daniel, filth division president rjntj rlnn'l) In Mi wlndt bromine ilrtini HOMETOWN HERO Don't 'Phone For Returns, Please TEXAS pin Doug's Crate Loses Door Knob At Corrigan Field mer may by paying a designated premium, Insure a normal yield for 19.13. The tovprnnient wilt Insure Ine normal yielc! by paylns. either in wheat or cash, the difference In 1 tor tr the 1639 ,vie'.d and tile average yield over five-year period. Taylor caunti'.s wheat acreage rhas not been nlJotlert but will be known at an early date, the county agtst states. Gf attending the convention arc 15 del-gates and 15 alternate; who hive teen selected to represnt the local post of the legion. Ten delegates from Abilene have been elected to represent the Abi- aimliary. GoH Star bp at a tea in police pisfo! ransc lA'f. the governor's man.-lDn Mcnrfay af- He thought all had bc-en I t'rno-in with t'nr covrrnor's wife. Mrs. Jamps V. Alircd, as hootcss. Parts of the shcil torr w-Tir.ds a half Inch deep over a foot-long area in the child's He was rushed to a physician's office rea-.ment. and last was restir.s well at his home. The boy's father said the cart-line post's rtdse was one of several picked up i mothers at the Kirby. fired. GALVESTO.Y. 2fl Prom siianty and Uie of palm-studded Broadway poured Irishmen to- !o Tflconic to hts ih-ir hero, Doiijtas COfruan arrived before noon. tlvtn? the old airplane in which he crowd the Atlantic from New York to Dublin. IATTI. m UCC'FCS a-o. In Ihe harbor lei loost with Thtille ai he landed at the airport, which. will be known M DnufUf forrijran airport. Thr The land in ww nol wtlhoul mishap, howfTfr. Thf knob on the old planr fell off 13 he -jot out. The [Iyer spent thr afiern-vin ridir.i! behind a motorcycle po- lice escort hr: paraard and saved, endearirift himself with thfs quip: "Gal vest on used lo be i Inc tor a bunch of (Jran UiFfllc.) Thai maXn me feel home because I've broX- en a Tew rryulalfons Apparently he was referring lo his wronf irar fliichl, Sornetxxiy ajked if he Ind groTTi of Lie many reception.! him. As j.i ihe.-e m.iyori 'KCCji inutins and payiru mv t It never set iirexl of hr- .-.v.1. "TTie only I fiver n'orry about That will f h.r.e I sure gla-j lo f.i fi.sh here today be- cause everywhere I've beer, trie last few days they have served .ItfiMfn F. took the flyer to the old brownstone house in which Corrigan wai born 31 ijo. "Was 1 born Corrifan asKed. "I thoufht t was born (n Do nol Ihe Reporter- Xem (or election re- Rrluriu will he nntil II p. m. by Radio Statiotx KRBC, sU- lion. will be no 'election it Ihr Reporter building, na of on icrcrn the will furnish relarns from Taylor county from other counties in ihw section on the local races, and also the tot-tl totf for cariJMjfes in races [or slate otfkes. Tar lor county precinct committeemf n a c r aaked to call the tn qufcttlr 4s pnv'.ible iftcr polls close at p. m.   

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