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Abilene Reporter News: Saturday, August 20, 1938 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 20, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               WIST TEXAS' own MEWSMKR VOL; LVI si. Abilene porter VWHOUT. OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRfRNDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS iT WISHES JIMMY HINES'GOOD LUCK' ABILENE, TEXAS..SATURDAY MORNING, AUGUST 20, 1938.-TEN PAGES UMditcl rim IAP) PRICE FIVE CENTS An unidentified well-wisher, gives Jimmy Hlnes (right) the' best as Hlnes, went Into court after a recess during hli trial on charges of participating In New York's policy racket. (Associat- ed Press Photo.) Capacity Crowd Turns Out For Scurry Rodeo Livestock Tough, Only .One Bronc Rider Qualifies By HARRV HOLT SNYDER, Aug. capacity crowd thronged cool. Wolf Park this afternoon for opening performance of the second annual Scurry coun- ty -rodeo, most colorful celebration naming western regalia beat a of the season. The clink of booted spurs still echoed from downtown streets to the rodeo arena where hundreds of cowboys and dressed in trail today. They stayed (or tonight's show and afterwards the open-air dance. In reality the event was opened Thursday night when a street dance attracted persons. They wriggled and elbowed across the pavement to music of the Rain- water boys' string band. OUT-OF-TOWN VISITORS While a goodly portlon'Of today's crowd was from Scurry, county, there were representatives from Borden. Garza, Mitchell, Nolan, Kent. Midland, Taylor and other counties, Bill Milter, Racket Political Donations Told One Of Three Negro Witnesses Names 'Jimmy Mines Club' As Funds Recipient NEW YORK, Aug. _. rher policy bankers ol Harlem that Dutch Schultt, founder chocolate-colored for-' calmly told a supreme court Jury today oi-uuiu, icunoer or. the numbers racket to which Tammany Boss Jimmy Hlnes is charged with giving political protection, contributed thousands of dollars from racket funds to election campaigns here Alexander Pompez, who once not for Dutch- mans orders to surrender his bank to the racket, testified was taken from his treasury In the fall of IMS. "George Wclnberg say that they was going to use this money for a Pompei sadi. Another former policy magnfife rhose business was taken over by the; SchulU .-strong-arm 'gang in th'ecph; trlbutions more directly to Hlnes, against whom' Weinberff, who was Indicted with him, already "has testified, Every week; Ison said. "was deducled tioav the profit sheet of his .bank as an experts e Item. "They said to he testified, 'that Is going to Jimmy Hines' Britain Demands Officer's Release Germany Fails To Comply; Full Explanation Asked LONDON, Aug. Annoy ed.'and puzzled, the British foreign office today demanded that Ger- many release Captain TKomas Ktndrick, British passport officer In Vienna who was arrested by German' secret police, and explain the detention. Tonight Germany had done neither, although the British gov- ernment Informed Berlin it takes "a serious view" of the incident. The ambassador to Germany, Sir Nevlle Henderson, asked the Ger- man government for "a full arid speedy explanation." Kendrlck. for 13 years passport control officer In Vienna, dirt not have diplomatic- immunity, and consequently Germany was within her rights In arresting him. Kendrick was arrestei Wednes- day at Freiiasslng, Bavaria, where he and his wife expected to cross the border Into Switzerland en- route to England for a vacation. Mrs. Kendrick was permitted to return to her home In Vienna. Ken- drick was taken to Vienna's met- ropole hotel, th headquarters. secret service One theory was that the nazls thought Kendrlck had Issued too many passport visas to refugees. He- has kept his passport office open U hours o day and Is believed (o have Issued as many as 200 visas a day since the annexation of Austria. Other theories were that he was suspected) of bein? a spy, or was suspected of evading the German currency laws. School Leaders To Meet At Fair Park "The county school board and superintendent will be hosts today to district trustees and superintend- ents in Taylor county at a program and luncheon at Fair Park. The affair will begin at 10 o'clock In Fair Park-auditorium, with a barbecue luncheon to be served by the chamber of commerce at noon. Round table discussions of school problems and plans for the ap- proaching school year will compose the program. Fireman Mangled By Trestle Beam TEMPLE, Aug. P. Saycs, St. Santa Fe railroad fire- man, was killed today when he was mangled by a steel beam on a rail- road trestle over the Leon river east of here. Percy Warren, chief brakemsn on the train, said Hayes had oiled the front part of (he engine, had hand- ed his oil can through the cab wln- 3tiw and sorted around the engine fhen the trp.in approached the Utstle. club." A little later he related that he was told that two deductions of were for "campaign funds" to help elect a "democratic mayor and the democratic district at- torney." That was In 1933 when Fiorello was republican mayoral candidate opposing Joseph V. Mc- Kee, on th? "recovery" party ticket, and John P. O'Brien democrat, La- Quardia won. LCRA Chief Asserts Dam Checked Flood AUSTIN, Aug Lower Colorado River authority, charged with contributing to the disastrous July flood, today climaxed lengthy, technical testimony with engineer- Ing data indicating operation of the Buchanan dam actually diminished the flow. Answering assertions ttie flood could have been averted by opening the darn galas earlier. Clarence Mc- Donough, LCHA manager, testified before a Texas senate Investigating committee that If the gates had been opened sooner It would have caused a "man-made" flood Instead of retarding a natural overflow. _. ftoo line; cnarged by the Community Nature Gas Co., in 23 state cities and towns, wilh savings to consumers estimated at to an- nually, was agreed upon unanim- ously today by the corporation com- mission. The formal order will be Issued Monday. Towns to benefit Include Caddo. Davidson, Frederick, Hast- ings, Hugo, Loco, Wynnewood, Mar- ietta, Manttou, Maysvllle, Mountain Ryan, Snyder, Waurlka and Wayne. >r H. G. Towle. J. M. Stewart, president of the rodeo association, and Joe York, arena director. led the gigantic parade which was Immediately be- fore the afternoon performance. Cowboys found the livestock: plentp toueh with only one bronc rider qualifying m the first go- round. First-day winners were not to be announced until after the night performance. Less than half of the cow milkers made time and many calves kicked loose. Elizabeth Miller, Scurry'.county cowgirl and winner of the .sponsor contest at the Texas Cowboy re- union this year, was introduced as were the judges, W. B. of Rotan, Jim York and Allen Stephens of Snyder. SILVER KING HIT The educated horse, Silver King, owned by L. I. Stewart of Big Spring and shown by Ttuett Tav- lor_of was a. hit. with the audience. ii. Cogdell Jr.. 16- year-old Snvder boy.: won a'hearty with1': his roping stunts. John -Wn'dsev arid his 'edu- cated mule, Hoover, were to their.usual 'stunk. Frank Hosllck of Cameron turneri in the best afternoon time in wild row wllkinif with n.6 seconds. The 18.8 seconds posted by Monroe Marburgsr of Abilene was good for second, and Raymond. Berryhill of Snvder was third In 28 seconds. Wayne Boyd of .Trent, was -first In calf roping In 19 seconds. The time of 21.4 seconds made by Jim 'Reynolds of Albany was good for second. 0. L. Harris and S. G. Russell were next In 25 sec- onds. Bob Whltesides toppled from Sun- down In opening .of bronc riding. Dynamite threw Buck McDogle; Bob Elliott was a victim of Hell Diver, and BUI Hart was the last rider to be bucked off. Piaster Parish rode Done Gone. W. 'T. Howell, James Johnson, Bob Whitesides and R. J. Wilkin- son made rides. J. B. Hunter failed to quality. Second Bole For County Is Ginned Taylor county's second bale ot cot- ton was received Friday at the same gin, from the same grower and Wfis the same buyer for the bale Thursday night. Charles Beasley brought the sec- ond bale to the Farmers gin, re- ceiving a 430 pound turnout from pounds of seed cotton. His first bale Thursday, weighing 481 pounds, was bought by E. M. What- eight and one-fourth cents per Minn) uied the "soviet pound, same price paid for the sec- the raised clenched ad- Gas Firm Slashes Rates In 23 Towns order reducing oas to Beasley for his first testimony that communists had re- hv ih. bale. Whatley said last nlsht It had crulted them for the war In Snain ond bate. A premium Is being made among business of-the city fo l sa "g a em or e war n Sp H grown (o and the the Justice Q completed today. Hughes Hops QLENDALE. Calif., Aug. 19.-W Hughes, wealthy world- girdling Hier, hopped off tonight for a_ sub-stratosphere flight to New i breathing ap- by the Mayo Tipton, paratus developed Brothers Clinic. PIPELINE PROBATION NOTED- More Saturday Closings Loom PICKETS CHEERED BY HOPE OF COMPROMISE TO KEEP PRIEST Commissioners Consider Order For September. VULCAN, Mich., Aug. miners and sun-tanned farmers, their faces streaked rain, cheer- ed late -today when they learned there waj hope for compromise whereby they might keep their priest whose home they were picketing to prevent his transfer. In word relayed from Rome through Wishlnjlon, the gen- eral mptrlor of the Salntoriin order Informed Father Wrmon Borkowskl, beleaguered print of Si. Barbara'! Catholic church, that If Bishop Joseph C. PU- KU at Marquetle, Mich., would accept him In hit dlo- ettt, the order would not trans- fer htm to a Wlseoruin strain Father Simon was "loaned" to the Marquette diocese 13 years ago. Ordered by hU superiors to re- turn to the seminary, Father Si- mon, with two suitcases in his hands, was turned back by the pickets at the door of the rectory where he Is held a virtual prisoner. The church Is locked and the "pick- et leader: hold the keyj. At the bishop's office It was re- ported his grace had no comment. Night and day Mnnday the parishioners have psUu'Med the grounds of the little mining com- munity church, "We will continue to the ipokesnun, Leonard PJourde, a parUhkmer, "until we know Father Simon will remain. He Monji (o these people. They love him and want him. No one can lake hli place." Big Day Monday, August CRUSADE KICKOFF SLATED Today Is lime To Remit Fees AS ROOSEVELT PLEDGES U. S. AID TO CANADA President Roosevelt is shown at Kingston, Canada, where he pledged the United States 'Will not.stand Idly hy.H tamiaMm of Canadian soil Is threatened by any other ration At the left to Albert Matthews, lieutenant- governor of (Assodat- Rally Of Sales Persons Friday To Starr Drive Directors of the Abilene Sales 2rusade list night prepared to mean jobs" cam- paign here next Friday night. At that time, all firms of the :ity aligning themselves with the crusade will rally their sales per- sons In a gathering at the Abilene iJgh school auditorium heralding the start of the campaign. W V Ballew of Dallas, general sales manager of the Dr. Pepper Bot- tling company and president: of the National Baits as- sociation, will make the tosplri- tlona] address on sales technimie. rABADE, MASS MEZT Officially, the crusade will swing Into action.the following day Sat- urday, August 27.' It will' ftia momentum-, hi a mammoth parade to be participated lnr' firms PROBE WITNESS SAYS- Reds 'Rule' WPA Theater Ask Check On Recruiting Law U: S. Funds Used To Spread Reds' Doctrine, Charge WASHINGTON, Aug. Mrs: Hazel Huffman of New York City-testified before the house com- mittee on un-American activities today the federal theater project of VVPA was dominated by radicals and-using public funds to spread the doctrine of- communism. Explaining she had obtained her information from personal Investi- gation, she asserted that ganda plays were the that oyes of the project were com- --I to Join communist organi- zations and the project was violat- ing the law which created it by employing aliens. x The committee received testimony from two veterans of the war in .------------------a...-j Spain that Representatives O'Con- ley manager of Farmer's gin, for nell D-Mont) and Bernard (D- dressing Spanish government army up members during a visit to Spain On the basis of Ihe veterans' t to Investigate whether ivuajr. tu investigate wnctner Eeasley grew the cotton on the W. had bcsn any violation of a J. Bryant farm near McMurry col- forbidding enlistment 01 Amer- ican citizens for duty In foreign armies. At the department. It was said the request would be given careful attention. Mrs. Huffman, a registered nurse ho said she also had had 26 eeks' experience In the theater, >ld the committee her first con- tact with the theater projjcl was as nrt "untter-cover Investigator" for the city relief administration In New York. TO UNDERGO Red Cross Mobilizes To Aid El Paso Civilians FORT BLISS, Aug. were cluttered with ambulances, horses and guns today as Red Cross units at Fort Bliss mobilized to give "first-aid" to H Pasoans who theortically will be killed or In- jured during third army war games (o start Monday. A. D. Mudd, field director for the Red Cross, will be In charge of handling "casualties" among civilians. The Blue army departed yes- terday for an unannounced des- tination. Members of Ihs Brown fortes will move out Monday at 5 a. m. to seek the "enemy." On paper, El Paso will under- go bombings similar to those In the Chinese-Japanese war. Bombs from high-flying planes will drive civilians to cover. Ar- tillery shells will, rbjast" down- town' buildings. Simulated gunfire will break out Monday, and El Pasoans will be "evacuated" from Ihelr homes promptly. If the "wer" swings toward the city. Citizens would swarm out of the city on the upper and lower Rio Grande valley highways to get away from "enemy" bombing planes and. artillery. Major General George Van Horn Moseley, commanding general of the third army, will arrive In El at 8 a. m to- morrow to observe war games In this area. He has been attend- ing maneuvers at Camp' Builis ncsr San Antonio. New Lamp, Cooled By Miniature Niagara Falls, One Fifth As Bright As RealSun NEW. A.-brilliant new electric light, in which a midget sun, one filth u bright as the real sun, shines through a miniature Niagara Falls, was announced today by the General Electric company. the light-itself b no bigger than a.pin-head but It U-so hot It would destroy Itself were -it cooled by a- waterfall which pours three of water over it every minute. The "sun" ind the "Niagara" together are small enough to be housed-In a glass tube the size. of a shotgun cartridge. The lamp, developed In the General Electric laboratories, produces watts from a mercury arc. It consists' of two glass tubes, one within the otheK The smaller tube Is of quartz. Within It Is the midget globule of mercury arid a trace of argon.gaj. Between- this quartz tube, which is about as big as a cigaret, and. the' outer glass Uie wat- erfall. No-Bill Guard In Convict Slaying CROCKETT, Aug. The Houston county grand Jury returned a no-bill today In the case of Bob Parker, dog sergeant at the Rut- ham state prison farm, who had been charged with the slaying of John Hendrix Frazler, escaped con- vict. About 20 witnesses. Including Sheriff Arch Maples' who had filed the oemplaint, appeared before the grand Jury. District Attorney Tom Pickett said .the grand jury report to Judg( Sam a. Holland made no mention of a prison-board Investigation of the shooting of Frazter. While the grand jury investiga- tion in progress here today, a committee named by the state prl- wn board was probing the same ca.se at Kuntsvllle. Frazier was among eight convicts who escaped from prison farm Tuesday. Sheriff Maples and J. P. Oliver. A prison guard. Mid they witnessed the shooting of Frailer. Raymond Fort Worth, another fugitive, was killed. The bodies of two other convtcls, who drowned, were found in a river. Corron Damaged By Ship Blaze CORPUS Aug 19-W> thousand bales of cotton were damaged b> fire, smoke and water when a fire broke out this after- noon in the No. 4 hold of the Davl- slan as the British cargo vessel was preparing to Manchester. Rebels Launch New Offensive HENDAYE, France (At the Span- ish Aug. alissimo Francisco Franco today .shifted his Insurgent legions for a new general offensive to bring the two-year-old Spanish civil war to close before winter. The preparatory maneuvers were accompanied by a new fury of aeria bombardments along the eastern coast tn which British shipping suf- fered heavily. The actual war fronts were comparatively Quiet. Assaults today on the government capital In Catalonia and on two Cata Ionian coastal villa ses were re- ported to have Injured or killed more than 150 persons. Reports of the new stirrings fo! lowed, perhaps significantly, upon these developments: "coincidence" of visits to Zurich of the premier of the Bar- celona government, and the Duke of Alba, Spanish Insurgent represents live In London. If there were peaci negotiations tfiey must have collaps, view of Franco's pvcpara tions. pressure on Italy for Information on charges that Pre- mier Mussoitai had sent troops re- inforcements and additional war material to Insurgent Spain. Hearing Reveals Lack Of Markets, Terrell Declares AUSTIN, Aug., The possibility of a return with- in the near future to statewide Saturday oil production shut- downs was emphasized by the railroad commission today af- ter the monthly proration hear- ing TO MATCH MARKET The. commlslson, beglntag consid- eration of a proration order for Sep- tember, said it mlBht be necessary fort he state's wells M stand Idle two days a week as they did in late May and throughout June. 'The hearing saJd Chair- man C. V- Terrell, "revealed that la many parti of the state oil men are not finding a ready market to their product In Mveral sections, pipeline DALLAS, men W. Burtord, president of (te East Teua com- paay, uuwnneed today a portlni of per barrel.tor East Teiaa crude oil, effective at 7 a. m. tomorrow. The new friet doctlon of IS Proration hu been Instituted. Pur- chasers of Cayugii field oil aaid tha there should be" juhrtan- ttafly cut because at Increased LThere seemed to be 'a.pretty gen- Indication over that crude very-slow. Under the law our duty to keep producUon within art tiat momentum in a mammoth parade an 'tote are deter- to be participated In all firms to dq so even'- though tna Monday-afternoon 'at' 5 o'clock It' "iema the returp. ot the Situr to j, turn wlll.be the public Is mvlted-Hit HmrciJn- nitii fjitit. PIT wDaliltnfir.' __________ the public Is mvlted-J-it Slmmoru stadluoj it j o'clock. Another, speaker of national re- nown trill be on hand to make the keynote address for" the klckoff Monday night, August J9. tap cami Du-ectors of the crusade will be- Kcord Uuf ire director of" the pliwe printing material toX day. -Banners and pennanti wiU be ordered. InporUai of General Cruirman G. W. Wald- np appealed ta aU finaj of the etty interested' in Ihe crusade TODAY by Modiaf their asMsaments HeKlntie at the chamber ill eomierte. In torn, merehinti nteiie m paekafe fpJl of nrlov "win- dow sticken and peanaats, -pUcardi, automobile stickers and pledfe cards with which U spur the enuade. In Ihetr place POr assessment purposes, all the businesses In Hie city-have been divided Into seven Those employing 190 or more peraonj, from M to em- plojra, from 15 to 49 em. JJoTfj, into ID ta 14 em- ployes, S3; from five to nine em- pleyej, M; tiro to foar employrs, K, and Individuals, ZS cenU each. Briefly, the sales crusade is this: It ts patterned after the National Sales Crusade which has been stag- ed successfully in Fort Worth, Dal- las, Houston, Lincoln, Chicago and Set CRUSADE, U, Col 5 The Weather ABILENE and YlrinHy tlirday in 4 EAST TEXAS: r.rtl, HOtR I is II inMnieftt anil i sunvt todaj! T. M U II tat IkeraaUer raU decline. "All .thre.of ill.on the commis- PJIOE.ATIO.V, tf. U, Lauds'Stevienson Candidacy Music As Setting Soft strain" of old-fashioned muifc were heard In trie background as John Lee Smith of Throckmorton. concluded an eloipjent speech la support of Coke Sttveoson here list night. The musfeal setting was restful variation of the usual run off poli- tical speeches. It proved Its effec- tiveness the crowd quietly' listen- ed to the speaker's appeal Smith, who was- from that race In the first primary, peared in sapport. of Stevenson's candidacy for lleutenant-goverhor. The Throckmorton lawyer was in- troduced by Bnest.'Walter Wilson ot Abilene. Wilson told of his boy- hood actniainUnce with. "When you grow up with a boy. you know him welt enough to know what Wnd of man he said Wilson. Smith outlined the Importance of Ihe office of lieutenant governor, and complimented Stevenson on his clean campaign In the first primary. In praising Stevenson's business Jobs Not Enough, Sudetens Declare PRAHA, CzechoslovaXla, Auj. 19 German party lead- ers today described as "wholly in- adequate" Czechoslovakia's offer ot sail for Liverpool and civil Jobs as a peace gesture In their I demands for full equality. cessful fight against the 000 road bond tssue, proposed a few years ago. which would have been liquidated by property taxes. He pointed out that Stevenson, Instead, had supported the plan Of financing roads with gasoline Uxfs. Smith advised those present to sleet Stevenson If they wanted W. Lee O'Danlel to be successful In his old age pension program. He said that previous to O'DanieVj public announcement of his support of. Stevenson, Pierce Brooks, the other candidate had been claiming tha governor-nominate'3 support. IF IT'S NOT YOUR Spare The Rod P. ADVISES WOMAN dces punishment of children bv adulis other of the Peace Thea Ash remtaaed ar> Abilene woman t Tiday. before hls cmm atter striking and pinching iO-jear-oid girl living in the same apartment home. accuser! the girl 01 hawnj made too mmn noiw. After apologizing to ine girl and the mother. woman was releas- ed. Ash promised her a Jail sentence un ibe next such ottease.   

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