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Abilene Reporter News: Friday, August 19, 1938 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 19, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               WEST TEXAS' OWM NEWSPAPER ftfo gtoflene OR OPFENSR TD nn VOL. LVI11, NO. 80. OFFENSE TO FRfKNW OR YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS ,T HE'S SCURRY RODEO ARENA BOSS Joe York, shown astride lib favorite roping horse, h arena director of the Scurry County rodeo which opens totlay at Enyder. Leading cowboys of Tex- as will compete for approximate- ly In prize money given In the five events of the show. There, will be afternoon and night performances today and Saturday. York also Is a leading contestant In the roping events. Witness Jailed In Racket Trial Negro Repudiates Statement Lihkiiuj Mines To Schultx Syndicate Member committed as a material witness In the policy rac District Attorney Thomas E. policy raid. Pleadlnj he was threatened with Imprisonment by a trial of bw-n tal Farm Board Of WTCC TQ Meet Discrimination Against Area Is Seen In.Program Agricultural board of the West Texas chamber or commerce will meet here Monday of next week to discuss and study' the recently an- nounced agricultural adjustment program The WTCC contends that serious discriminations against west Texas farmers will re- If the program Is carried out. D. A. Bandeen, manager of the WTCC, called the meeting for 10 morning, the call being made upon authority of Pres- ident H. s. Hilburn of Plalnvlew and Clifford B. Jones of Spur, chairman if the agricultural board. State Commissioner of Agriculture J. E. McDonald has bjen Invited to attend the meeting. According to claims of Ihe WTCC West Texas farmers will receive smaller wheat loans per bushel than farmers of any other state under the formula for making loans, as out- by the AAA. The discrimina- tion will result from excessive handling charges for West 'Texas farmers, there being considerably higher than in other wheat growing sections. The loans are to be made on the basis of 77 cents, less hand- ling charges, ivhlch in West Texas amount to approximately 23 cents per bushel, leaving 8 loan of only w cents. WTCO officials claim that under the same formula Kansas farmers will get about 58 csnts, North Da- kota wheat growers about 65 cents Kentucky arid Ohio farmers about 10 csnls. The WTCC agricultural board will study a course of action In protest- ing the present set-up. Use of the same -formula for making cotton loans, which also would result In discriminations against West Texas cotton growers, also will be pro- tested. Plans to renew activities of the organization In behalf of the domes- tic allotment plan for agriculture, launched at the PJalnvlew conven- tion oi the organization In 1535 probably win be considered at Mon- day's meeting. Members of the agricultural board arc onairman Jones, Hugo Haterlus Lued.'rs; J. o. Oulckc, Amarillo- R' C. Hopping, Lubbock; R.E. Dickson Spur; J. A. Crump. Paducatv J J Stcele, Anson; R. E. Patterson, Lock- Pi ttard.mAnson[ "and Snyder. uy H assisi- Williams denied he actually had; made a statement in which he was. quoted as saying Hlnes sent him to Harlem policy racket head- quarters in 1932 to obta'Jn employ- ment from George -Welnberg. Echultz henchman who has pleaded guilty lo the racket Indictment. The witness declared that .Sol AUGUST 19. 1938-FQURTFFM New Time Capsule' Will Tell All About Us To People 5.000 EW YORK, Aug. 1B.-M- .nrf PR ICE FIVE CENT'S NEW YORK, Aug. A streamlined "tomb" for the machine age was being built by science today to let people years from now know What we were like. H will be filled wllh the things that make us what ire Including typical wo- man's hat. To balance the there will be serious things relating to government and Industry, re- ligion and philosophy, history and geology, music and art. So that archeloglsts who dig up the "tomb" will not Just look at the hat, laugh and dismiss iw as a peculiar race, the Smithsonian institution hopes (o place In the machine age sarcophagus a "key to English" which will make it for persons unfamiliar with Eng-, llsh to understand our lan- guage. The whole thing will be burled somewhere In Ihe World's Fair ground this fall. The belnj built In the laboratories of the West- Infhouse Electric and Manufic- luring company, is a cross be- tween old King Tut's last resl- Inf place and something would eipect to find on Mars. ON FDR'S PURGE It Is called i "lime capsule. Like King Tut's tomb, the "capsule" will have Inner crypt and an outer chamber, and will look roughly like a shell from a big Bertha. It will be seven feet, two Inches long ar.d eight Inches In diam- eter. Since the "capsule" is 'ex- pected to last 5.000 years, the outer shell Is being constructed ot a new metallic alloy. In the Inner crypt will be an envelope ol heat-mutant llasi Imbedded In a water- proof substance, when the M- Hca ot this age, of our! have been placed Inside It, all the air will be removed from It and the glass invetope will then be tilled with nitrogen or some other Inert j-as to act as a preservative. To make sure the people years from flnd the the scientists are writing boolt about It and distributing It to museums and libraries all over the world. If all the books destroyed by then well prob- ably be forgotten, swing the number.; racket, armaments races and all. O'Connor Asks Nation To Back Fight At Stevenson Rally Tonight Primary Rival 'Pinch Hits' In Wes'tex Areas A Stevenson-for-Ueutenant-gov- ernor rally be staged In Abilene tonight with a first primary op- ponent as principal speaker In be- half of Coke Stevenson, run-off campaign candidate, and former speaker of the Texas House of Rep- resentatives. John Lee Smith, of. Throckmor- ton, who recently announced his support of Stevenson, following an unsuccessful race In the July pri- mary, Is schtduled to commend his recent rival to voters of Abilene and vicinity at the ralty to be held on federal lawn, beginning at 8 o'clock. Smith this week consented to "pinch hit" for Stevenson In this -and other West Texas areas the candidate's 'crowded schedule will not permit him to visit a sec- ond time. Stevenson visited in Abi- lene during the first primary, but did not' speak here at a public rally., Ernest W. Wilson will Introduce Smith at tonight's rally. Preceding the rally he will apeak in behalf ujav oonof Stevejison on.. radio station ____- assistant, dictated U> p. m. the Jtatement.- Williams added he includ- did 'HOt knOW WES In 'np mftiw flrtt. nt statement because, he said, COINCIDENCES JUST BEGIN WITH BIRTHS HACKENSACK, N. J., Aug. 18 Mrs Manna of Montvale and Mrs. OsbOrnTof dale, sharing a room at Hackensack hospital, met for the first time after they had babies on the "me clay-both alrls. coincidence? h the saiM Edna. Their the same first names-Harold Their babies will have the same names-Patricia Their husbands' birthdays are In the sam? Both couples have Vn married and a half years. The babies were their first Doth mothers are'blue-eyed brunettes, wear the same sized clothes. Their husbands are of the wives W-ftV.'SnSj thlt W the Each rouple has a do? named "Spot" And last but not least both motherland both babies are doing very nicely, thank you the could not read and was, ashamed to admit Illiteracy. He dented he had known Hlnes before 1936, as the statement said, or that he had worked for Weln- berg.' District Attorney Dewey con- fronted the negro with grand Jury minutes In which he was quoted as saying substantially the same thing as in the signed statement. Three former Harlem policy op- erators preceded Williams to the stand. Camille Moruato, 48 a British West Indies negro, told of a hearing six years.ago In Edwin's court when the magistrate dismiss- ed defendants because It could not be shown they "eierdsed any ownership or control" ovir policy slips seized in a raid. Recover Body Of Girl From SABA, Aug. Is.-m-The body of Parallee EaWn, 17. of thwalte, -who drowned in the Colo- rado river near there yesterday was recovered today by membere of the San Saba fire department the San Saba high school foot- ball team. The body was found S 1-2 mile.' oownstreair. from the spot where she went down while In swim- ninp party. Desperadoes Hunted In Oklahoma Hills BROKEN BOW, Oila., Aug 18 trails of the ing many first primary backers.pl Smith, arc expected to attend the rally from Abilene and throughout Taylor and surrounding counties as far away as Throckmorton. Stevenson Is a pioneer rancher In Kimbell county, and practicing at- torney at Junction. By reason of his life-long residence in the South- west Texas "hill Steven- son was referred to as_the original "hill billy" candidate, even before his recent endorsemen' by W. Lee O'Danlcl, gubernatorial nominee and mountain music exponent, ac- cording to local Stevenson support Vaudeville Comedians Reunited In Death NEW YORK, Aug. The old vaudeville comedy team of Mc- Intyre and Heath death. was reunited Thomas K. Heath co-star In the 'coon buck" dance, the famous skit "The Ham Tree" and other suc- iraiis oi tm., jesses of half a century, died of a southeastern Oklahoma hill coun-' attack at his home In Selau- try tonight apparently hid des- peradoes Floyd Hamilton and Ted Walters from ket, Long Islano, at the age of 85. Just a year alter the passing of his partner. Heath never knew Hclntyre was The fleeing pair, shot from their dMi with paralysis Just automobile near Dsqucen Ark la-' as Mclntyle was dying. Heath lay Saturday, iras hcliniwi t.-i tv, ih'I an Invaii' from three statjs. a posse of officers Saturday, iras believed to be the two men who appeared at a farmhouse and demanded food near Hocha- lown, north pf here. Posse "of nearly two score federal, stale and county officers from Oklahoma, Arkansas and Texas immediately shifted their search from the Dequeen area to north of here. The fugitives were believed to be beating their way through the un- dergrowth northward toward the Cookson hills, which for a century had been a notorious hideaway for bad men. Sight-Seeing Plane Crashes, 14 Killed VARESE, Italy, Aug. Fourteen persons aboard a seaplane were killed today when the big twin-motored ship fell shortly aft- er taking off here on a sight-see- ing flight over this Italian-Swiss border town. The accident brought to 66 the number of persons kilted this year In Italy's four major civil aviation crashes. for a year as his family kept the news from him. Order Guards From Mjaytag Strike Scene NEWTON. la.. Aug. Nelson G. Kraschel tonight ordered immediate withdrawal of national guard troops from the scene of the Maytag washing machine strike at Newton. la. Withdrawal of the troops, sent into the strike zone July 20, Is de- signed lo facilitate a friendly set- llemcnt of the three months old labor, controversy between the com- pany and its CIO union, the gov- ernor said. Loyalist Victories HEJIDAVE, FRANCE (AT THE SPANISH Aug. 18.- WV-The Spanish government today reported victories on the two most Important civil war In the Ebro river valley and west of Almadtn, the mercury mining center. THIRD GRANTED REPRIEVE- Pair Dies In Texas Chair Allred Grants Mexican Stay Holdup Slayer And Wife Killer Pay'With Lives HUNTSVILLE Aug. man who killed hts wife at El Paso with.a soda water bottle and another who kl'lted'ft san An- tonio bus driver in a hold-up were executed In the electric chair at the state penitentiary here shortly alter midnight. First to die was Colian H. MorgarT of El Paso. He was strapped Into the chair at A. M. and was pronounced dead at A. M. Next was Jesse Polanco, who sang a little song "to the sweetest girl In-San Antonio" Just before he died. He went to the chair at A. ,M. and was dead' In a few minutes. A thirty-day reprieve, granted today by Governor James .V. Allred prevented the scheduled execution of a third convicted slayer, Carlos Fernandez pf 'Bexar county. Fer- nandez was convicted of slaying John Stowe, a, policeman, in a San Antonio bar. Allred's action-came after the slate board of pardons and paroles at Austin decided against clemency tor any of the three. The state contended that Morgan and hts wife had had considerable trouble, that Morgan found a letter Intimating she wanted.to leave him. and that on the night ot June 20 as they played cards alone in the house, Morgan1 grabbed his wife, choked her unj.il she was uncon- scious, struck her on the head with a bottle and wrapped a lamp cord around her neck. Mor- gan's defense was Insanity. GUARD RELEASED BOND IN CONVICT'S SLAYING Sheriff Testifies Before Houston County Jury; King Still At Large Street Dance Starts Festivity At Snyder SNYDER, Aug. IS preparation for her most colorful event In years. Snyder tonight cele- brated with a giant street dance sing song and hillbilly music by musicians who will perform during the annual rodeo at Wolf Park Fri- day and Saturday. The spirit of the old west re- vived as real and drugstore cowboys and cowgirls made whoopee in boot- ed abandon, More than 75 en- trants are expected to compete for more than 41.000 cash and mer- chandise prizes during the two afternoon and two night, shows. Shallow Production Struck In Young OLNFY. is. A new area of shallow production ap- Jarently was opened In northern Young county today when E D Wells ct at No. 1 Graham P. stew- art, bailed six barrels of oil per hour. The production was from cl st 535 to WO 1-2 feet. .-sswSSHSftSS'.'- Qreer. Sheriff Arch Maples, who saU he saw the shooting of Prarier filed the charge in Justice D D -Long's court yesterday. Maples said'the' grand Jury'wa Investigating the slaying and thai he had testified today before the body In connection with the case. Another convict, Raymond Wil- kerson of Port Worth, was killed yesterday with Frazler. Two other fugitives from the farm already had-been slain by posse's bullets; two had been found drowned, ana one recaptured. An elghtn Roy King, remained at large. Saturday Shutdown Proposals Indicated AUSTIN, Aug. rail- road commission will hear evidence tomorrow. on which to base its statewide oil proration order for September. With gasoline corisumptlon 'due to start declining In about three weefcs, indications were there'might te some agitation for restoration ol Saturday oil production shutdowns. Sunday shutdowns have been la ef- fect since January. The current Texas production'al- lowance Is slfehtly higher, than that recommended by the United States bureau of mines. Correction-- The Reporter-News wishes to make this voluntary correction of a statement published yes- terday morning in an account of a rally in Abilene for C. V. Terrell, candidate for state rail- road commissioner. The statement was that a speaker "drew from his pocket a huge printed sheet which re- produced photostatlc copies ot various checks and documents allegedly connecting Sadler with Illegal liquor traffic In Kilgore." The statement obvi- ously referred to O. A. Jerry Sadler, Mr. Terrell's opponent. The word "Illegal" should not. have been used in this report. The RcporMr-Nea-.! wishes to take this means. In the first morning edition after publica- tion of this statement, of cer- rccting this statement, caused by a reporter's failure to examine the facts closely enough. VOICED BEFORE MERCHANTS ASSOCIATION- CITY OFFICIALS GIVE SCANT NOTICE TO MANAGER PROPOSAL AdvnMr.v nf of the city manager form of government, voiced by Eddie Cocteell, secretary of the Retail Merchants assoclallon !n a speech. before that body, re- ceived scant notice of city of- ficials Friday. Of three members of the commission contacted, one would express definite opinions. The other two members could not be contacted last iilghl Mayor W. W. Hair said he had not studied the question sulllclcntly to make remarks Luclan Webb, commissioner' expressed an opinion, off the record, then ordered that It not be published. Commissioner L, A. S-idler said he had not studied the form. Indicating he had an open mind on Ihe idea. "I firmly bcllsve that a city manager form of government L' the only solution lo our present Cockercll said. In his talk. He hastened to add that he thought all the present commissioners and the maytr to be fine fellows In every way. "But If other cltlrs the stze of AbUcne. and cities both larger and smaller, have found It profitable to operate under a city manager, why wouldn't It be wise for us to Reasons for preferring the city manager form, as listed by Cockerell, were more efficient handling of business alfalrs and economies In operation. "Why can't we Induce sound business men to sit In council with a city manager and elimi- nate some ol the waste we have been having locally? Why should we vote for some poor fellow Just becaure he the Job instead of demanding the oc.M lo serve Taylor's First Bale Ginned Taylor'county's flrat bale of cot- ton was- ginned last night by the Farmers Gin. Charles Beaslsy brought 1830 pounds cotton to the gin ai p. m. The pound bale was ginned at E. M. Wh alley manager, said last night The cotton was raised on the W J. Bryant farm'near McMurry col- lege. Beasley was a second place winner last year by a close mar- gin. The 'cotton had not been sold late last night. Haskell First Bale Sells At 9 Cents HASKELL, Aug. bale of 1938 cotton to be ginned In Haskell was brought In' late Thurs- day by Paul Russell, farmer living between Weinert and Rochester. OInned by the Duncan GUI com- pany from pounds of seed cotton; the bale weighed  H4nlrtil ___ tnl lanril Irmptrftldr. iltrdv, M 1J; nn IM 11. Dr. William LaMance attend- etl funeral services for hts wife vVtlllamsberg, Kas.. with mother, shown seited beyond him. The uciede, Sfo. osteo- path was crurjed murJer for the death ot his wife, whose body was found In a cellar it iheir home. (Associated. Press   

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