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Abilene Reporter News: Wednesday, August 17, 1938 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 17, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               WIST TEXAS' NEWSPAPER VOL LV111, NO. 78. Searchers Slay Two Felons In Prison Break 'Escape Leader Recaptured; 5 Still At Large HUNTSVILLE, Aug. IS.- Searchers closely pursuing eight convicts who stabbed a guard and escaped Easlham prison farm early today, this afternoon shot and killed Jack Kinsley and Charles Aaron, two of the fugitives, and re- captured W. E. Garner, alleged -leader of the break. The young desperadoes were shot as they fled through the Trinity river bottoms north of Eastham farm. There the search pressed northward for five other convicts, who, with the three killed and cap- lured, used dirks to wound seriously Guard John Qreer In the abdomen. Bouies of the slain convicts were taken to Eastham farm. The rec- ord's clerk here was notified of their deaths. Oreer, said by physicians to be "dangerously was per- mlted no visitors at the prison hos- pital here. He told Warden W. W. the eight men slipped up behind him as he accompanied a hoe squad to work. He said he fired his shotgun twice, but was uncertain whether he hit any of the men. The fugi- tives took his shotgun and possibly his pistol; Grecr said. They made their break ten miles from the nearest highway. State police and raneers were blockading roads. i TWO FROM AREA Still at large were John Hendrtx 21, of Dallas, sentenced to 15 years from Dallas and Tarrant counties for robbery; Leonard Smith, 26, Tyler, serving 22 years from Limestone county for burglary and assault; Raymond Wllkerson, 24, Fort Worth, sentenced to ten years from Haskell county for bur- glary; Frank Johnson, 23, kana, serving IB years-from Bowie for robbery with firearms, and Roy King, 26, sentenced to 20 years from HaskcU and Jones counties for robbery. Close WTU Co. Labor SAN AKOELO, Aug. National Labor Relations board hearing on alleged unfair labor practices charged against the West Texas Utilities company was closed here this afternoon. Employes repeatedly testified dur- ing the day that they had norbeen Impelled by utilities officials in company union activities. The com- Walnt charged the utilities company with Interference and domination In the formation and administration of a labor organization. Ah Intermediate report will be filed with the regional director by the triah examiner, Harlow Hurley, In the near future, after which the orgihlal com- will bo sent to the board at Washington for a decision. Revi'vol Of Horse Racing Asked PORT WORTH, Aug. Directors of ihe Texas Horse, Jack and Mule Breeders association in meetln lutlo governor-nominee, consider rein stating horse racing In Texas on a parimutucl basis. At the same.time, the president of the association, T. V. Lawson of Cleburnc, said the- group Is plan- ning to have representatives at the next legislature in January intro- duce a horse racing bill. Legallied racing was outlawed after a-bitter senate battle In 1537. Generals Retired LONDON, Aug. .--s Horc-Bellsha, British war secretary, put 13 generals on the retired list today In a drastic new shakeup designated to Joit the British army into vigorous equality with the march rnsn of Europe's dictators. UR WITH OFFENSE TO FRHWDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT ABILENE, TEXAS. WEDNESDAY MORNING, AUGUST 1-7, 1938.-TWELVE PAGES _ ____ <-rw i I No News Is Best News For Mary King, Awaiting Word Of Search For Convic7H S.Jffi.'ffi'S, PRICE FIVE CENTS FINIS didn't sleep much last night. She won't sleep much tonight, unless Mary's keeping vigil beside her radio. Occasionally she calk Ihe Reporter-News office. Or waits for a ring from one ot Its against hope he won't call. Even the suspense Is belter than what she might hear. No news news, husband, the father of small dauihUr he hasn't seen In three years, escaped In a daring break from a Texas prison farm yesterday. He was with seven others, one or more of whom stabbed a guard. Two were shot down within a.few hours. A third, as- sertedly the ringleader, was re- captured. Mary's husband is King, 26, and reputedly 'tough as a boot.' That's the way a Haskell officer described him yester- day. DESCRIPTION WEAN" "That was Mary de- fended, with spirit. King was sentenced in 1934 to serve -CO years In rhe peniten- tiary. He was convicted of fill- ing station robberies at Anson and Haskell. HE WON'T TALK Since then Mary has earned her own llvlnj. Wha't more, she was graduated last spring from one of Abllene's colleges. Her child lira with Mary'i parents In a nearby city. She doesn't know her father li a convict Only a few months ago .Vfary had hopes of gaining her hus- band's release. She told Wends of tentative assurance for a pa- role. "I never speak about personal affairs." was the replyxby Leo- pold Stokowski to reporters who questioned the conductor about Greta Garbo, movie actress. He Is shown as he -returned to New York after traveling several months about continental Europe with her. Reelect-Terrell Rally Tonight Speakers From Counties To ...Address i" Speakers from at least five coun- ties will address delcgatfohs..'fr'oin. scores of surrounding rural communities at the, West Tex- as. Reelect-Terrell rally to be staged In Abilene tonight In Honor of Judge C. V. Terrell, present chair- man, and candidate for reelection to the Texas Railroad' commission. Judge J. C. Hunter, of Abilene, will preside, according to arrange- ments completed last night. Calla- han county will be represented by a large delegation headed by Judge B. L. Russell, first speaker to be Introduced by Judge Hunter.-- L. D Ratliff, of Haskell, will introduce Judge Terrell. -Hon. Gulnn Williams, former member of the house of representa- tives from the 13th congressional district, but now of San Angela, Is scheduled to climax the speak- ing program with a speech which the program committee last night promised would prove both a high- light address and a figurative fire- worts display. As a former resi- dent of Judge native Wise county, former Congressman WI1- ul Hams Is scheduled to discuss the ting here today adopted a resc- commission chairman as a m asking that W. Lee O'Danlel and to pay tribute to his honesty and ability in his public and private life. Although former Congressman Williams' speech is to be the con- con- cluding feature of the program, It will contain so many points not to W covered by Judge Terrell, that It rill vie with the principal address iy the railroad commissioner both from the standpoint of length and vital Interest to voters, M. Shaw, :hairman of committee, asserted last Terrell night. OTHER CANDIDATES TALK Additional interest will center In :he rally through the presence of :andidates for local and district of- fices. Each local candidate will be Set RALLY, Pg. 12, Col. 6 Highway Work Order Due To Arrive Today To Be Spent On Taylor, Callahan Project Work order for six miles on high- way 36 In Callahan county Is ex- pected arrive In this morning's mail, 8. J. Treadaway, divisions highway engineer, announced yester- day afternoon. The order also calls for reworking 1 1-2 miles in Taylor county from State Highway 1 to Callahan county. Construction of a grade, drainage structures and rock base on Ihe en- tire projecd a total of 13 1-2 miles, ts authorized In the work order, Treadaway stated. An expenditure of Is authorized. The project, a joint WPA and state highway program, calls for em- ployment of from ISO to 200 men for am year or more. The highway de- partment will furnish equipment, engineer and superintendent for the project, WPA to furnish workmen. The project was approved In Washington about one rnonth ago but due to the extensive red tape, Issuance ot the work order was not possible until Tuesday, when the state WPA office In San Antonio wired Treadaway that It had been placed In the malls. Highway commission approval was given the project June 12. State WPA approval followed Immediate- ly. State and.local WPA officials, county commissioners and other state the project, Treadaway stated, as 'did Congress- man Clyde L. Oarrett. WORK 'SET MONDAY Actual work on .the project is ex- pected to begin not later than Mon- day of next week: A WPA official from San Ange'io Is due here today to assist In getting a crew ready. Application for a similar project on Highway 36 from Cross Plains west also Is on file In Washington, Treadaway 'states, but nothing has been heard :Irom It. The application was filed with the one approved for this end at Ihe highway. The Cross: PJalns application calls for paving of 14.5 miles at an ex- penditure of If that Is given final approval, as expected, the Abilene to Cross Plains high- way will lack only It mile gap of being provided for In this year's jrcgram. Treadaway Is most anxious that steps be taken toward getting Lhts strip paved. After that will come projects for paving gaps between Rising Star and Comanche, Comanche and Hamilton, Hamilton and Gatesville and Gatesville to Temple. Highway 36 association met in Oatesville Tuesday to.further plans for pav- ing of all gaps between Abilene and Temple. Abilene and the W :st Tex- as chamber of commerce was repre- sented at the Catesvtlle meeting by Clark Coursey, publicity director of the WTCC. Then King escaped Into the plney badlands. He stayed free 12 hours, wandering in area where it is possible to stay lost for days. The same blood- hounds which hunted him yes- terday were put on the trail. They've been known to chew men to pieces. Pursuing guards found King perched In a tree, waiting to go back. FIRST OF THREE BREAKS That was the first of three HIS llth AND 12th- breaks since the first of this year. King spent a month In soli- tary confinement. Subsequently re was assigned to the "hoe forfeiting the easier task of plowing prison farm lands. visited hlra this spring, after that first break. She found Klnrs guards able to Joke about the mailer. "Trouble Is, he wants to came home loo they pinned. Her husband tried to fulfill that pridlction August 5. Ho broke free again but was cap- tured several days later In Texarkana. This (Me, Mary belfevea King won't be again Sther he'll shoot It out or stay free. He's a several-times loser, she explains, and there's scant pros- See KING, PI. 12, Cot t Of Torso Slayer' STATIC ISOLATING7TANES IN BAD WEATHER BEING WHIPPED Body Of One Dissected In Four Parts NEW YORK, Aug. The static which endangers air Plane operation by obliterating communication between the pi- lot and ground stations may soon te a thing of the past, a commercial research laboratory announced today. Flight tests or a new ultra- high frequency apparatus show .the system is virtually free of interference In bad weather. The significance ot Ihe find- Ings lies in trie fact that here- snow, rain and other ad- verse conditlon.1 usually have set up a crackling on airplane communication channels. Pilots enroute from one air- port to another have been faced with the problem of "getting In" without reassuring word from the ground about visibility and often without the aid of ra- dio beams which mark the air highways throughout the na- tion. The system was designed for the Western Electric Co., by ttie Bell telephone laboratories and has been tested by Transconti- nental Western Air, Inc., on its New York-PHtsburgh route. The Western Electric Co, ex- pressed the belief that radio telephone service on a. frequen- cy of kilocycles would be generally adopted soon. Last February the department of commerce reported progress not only In ultra-high frequen- cy experiments between ground stations but also with radio ranges. SEQUEL TO s Foen Gun Battle Agent Wounded 'Right Thigh JUST BEFORE MIMIC CARFARE BEGAN IN TEXAS This ts an ambush party, wait- ing with a machine, gun, ready to go into action In the exten- sive war games under way near San The "Brown" .attack army made surprising gains against the Ing force in early skirmishes and had "surrounded" San Antonio. (As- sociated Press East Texas Auto Crash Kills Four iu luiers, m. snaw, HENDERSON, Aug. the Taylor county persons were killed and three were -red in the collision of two motor cars at a highway Intersection 16 miles southeast of here tonight. Dead were: W. M. Ross, 62, pro- ninent Mount Enterprise marchant, Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Herrlngton and heir 3-year-old son. The Herring- ons were believed to be from Luf- iln 'KICKOFF' PLANS Pick Sales Crusade Chief former president of the Abilene Christian college board of trustees, was named last night as salaried director of a Na- tional Sales Crusade campaign for Abilene, McKinzte's selection was an- nounced at n meeting at the Wool- en hotel of heads of Abllenc's big- gest businesses and the board of directors appointed last week to organize a local'campaign. At the same lime, the busi- ness leaders accorded Ihe board of directors a rousing vole of confidante by heartily approv- ing its efforts to date, and commanded Hie frroup to riuh plans for "klckotP of Ihe cru- sade by next week. Motion to endorse tho program as outlined by the board of direc- tors, and to authorize the" group to sol the "klclcoir date wis made by Clarence Solnlck, manager of Fiflh Avenue shop, WAS seconded by Jack Simmons, manager of Abi- lene l3-idry, and was voted un- inimously. J. E. McKINZIE Purpose of the movement Is to organize a united front of ail busi- nesses In the city to participate in a concerted sales campaign for at M A" "les f' large a n d small will be brought Into the campaign and It will be their cru- ve lo create by stirring the Interest of the buy- ing public, and thus create pros- perity and ultimately more jobs. Motto of the emsade Is "Saltj Mean Jobs." Attractive rtd and blue emblems and various ban- cooptratinr It has bten staged sncWMfullj. Dallas, Ho-jsisri, Fort Worth, Lincoln, Chicago, and scores of other ot the hrser cities of (he nation. Many ot iht business men present last night placed orders with w S Wsgley, cvf the board of for pennants, banners, emblems and other necessary supplies. Oth- ers may do so this morning by 'call- See CR.USADE, PI, 3, Col. 1 Banquet Opens Druggists' Meet Mayor Hair Will Welcome Visitors At Session Today Semi-annual convention of the West Texas Pharmaceutical asso- ciation officially opened last night with banquet and dance at Hotel Hilton, convention headquarters. Registration late last night stood at 212 and officials of the organlza- tion expected at least that many more to register today. k First business session ot the con- vention is scheduled for this morning. John B. Ray, Abilene, will call the meeting to order and the welcome address will be given by Major Will W. Hair. The response is to be made by Shine Phillips, Big Spring. Gerald C. Allen. Rob- ert Lee. president of the llon, will deliver his address at the close of Phillip's response. Follow- ing this the president will appoint convention committees, this to be followed by introduction of the Drug Travelers, sponsors of the drug clinic. Feature of today's program will be canamates wnose renomlna- the afternoon session which will tlon he opposes because of what he be devoted to a discussion of the _... fair trade bill. Bryan Bradbury, representative of Taylor county in the Texas legislature, will be the See DRUGGISTS, Tf. 3, Col. S FDR CALLS EMPHATICALLY FOR DEFEAl OF TYDINGS, O'CONNOR Latter 'Most Effective Obstructionist' In House, President's Statement Says Madrid AP Office Struck By Shells MADRID. AWT. ng housing the Associaicd Press of- fice was shelled tonight in the course of a severe bombardment ot :he city which started at 0 p. m. None fn the office va.i injured. A Modesto Torbes, lowevcr. had a narrow escape when a shell hit In the street below and a piece of s'Ml bum the As- sociated Prfss office, scattering files of papers and books. It was the second time the ollice iad been nil in bombardments since February 3. servatiye republican chairman of the all legislation muai, pass, was called "one of the most effective obstructionists arts ot the body wen not found cation. CORRIGAN TO FILM WRONG WAY FLIGHT speech, would produce. Ste BUREAU, Ps. 12, Col. 6 YORK, RKO Radio Pic- tures announced tonight it had contracted with Doug- las I'orrignn for a movie dramatization of his life and the famous wrong-ray flight to Ireland. The agreement calls only for Cornwall's story, but officials i-aid there was a possibility the airman miprlit nppt-ar in the pic- ture as well.   

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