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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: August 4, 1938 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 4, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               fsa 1 Little girtV Imagination Cause City To Drain WEST TEX4S' OWM NEWSMKft Abilene VOL. LVI11, NO, 67. "WITHOUT, OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS H tna ABILENE, TEXAS. THURSDAY MORNING, AUGUST 4, 1938. PAGES THIS WAS CRACK NAVY PLANE This tangled mass of wreck- -age Is what remained of a sleek navy torpedo plane after it went out of control over. San Diego Bay, burned and then sank into the water. Tugs pictured salvaging the wreck In which twonafy filers werevkllled when th'elr parachutes snarled in the fuselage. Capt. .J. A. pilot, stayed with the ship until It was 159 feet from the water, then leaped to safety. Governor Orders UnderMortjol Law Union Refusts Proposal For Wage Cut proposal to return to work under a 10 per cent wage cut. The governor at the same time disposed of the question of the right of the national labor relations board to resume the Maytag labor practices hearing in the federal court house here by amending his previous order to confine "the mili- tary district of Iowa to Jasper county only." The governor the May- tar CIO union had refused In accept the wage cut proposal and a military commission ril- ing which would have denied Jobs to 1Z of the workers while the city under mar- tial The 12, the governor quoted ihe commislon jay- ing, were "particAlarlj active in matters lending to aggravate and provoke disturbances In via The commission Is handling mat- ters of legal procedure during mili- tary rule at Newton. The Maytag plant closed May 9 when the union refused to accept 10 per cent.wage cut. The plant norniaUy employs about men. The hearing on charges brought by the union is scheduled to be re- sumed tomorrow with Charles lurry, NLRB general counsel, and Rob- ert Watts, associated general coun- sel, preseat as observers'. The gowrnor last week ordered martial law authorities to close the labor board hearing in Newton as "disturbing (actor'' In efforts to reach a settlement in the Newton strike. Board officials in Washington promptly denied Kraschels right to halt the hearing but ordered It moved to federal property here. Ex-Mayor Dies WAXAHACHIE, Aug. Former Mayor T. o. Cheatham of Wawhachle died at his home here today. The funeral will be tomorrow. The Weather vlflnlty: Tartly ttoMi Tharitfar tnd I OKr.AHOMA: rau'lj- flrtnilj. tof'lrr nfirlh pnitlnnt frl- flU. E.ANT Tf.X.lS: Itxal thunriPTthimrrit Thr.rjdav Kri.Tty, nin.ti on Itif W.ST TKXASs Mmllr ro lop pAnhin-lle frlday Kanct of Uvnprratnrf AH I1IH K H'tlW'l m. jr and trmprralum Iff I 91 II: jame flal, ;rt. unit Earmarked For Flood Repair In Central Texas AUSTIN. Aug. high- way commission today allocated for maintenance of Its 2UM-mlle road system In the fis- cal year beginning Sept. 1 and tar- marked for Immediate re- pair of Hood damaged bridges and roads in west central Texas. Of the maintenance budget, 8 per cent was ordered spent for traffic service-signs, markers and other safety an addi- tional 3 per cent for contingencies, including future flood damage. The commission appropriated SZ2JW for rehabilitation of damaged roads and bridges tn Tom .Green, Concho, Mesard, Klnble, Button and schlelcher counties and 6S8 more for similar work in StcCulloch, Stills and San Saba counties. Tie work will be done by department labor. In addition, it ordered plans pre- and bids asked for construc- tion of a Brady creek bridge In Brady on highway 23. The esti- mated cost was Adding to Its program ot paint- ing center slrtpes on asphalt roads Ihe commission set aside J32.MO from the current budget for more work of that nature. The officials entered many orders iftecling couniiw or groups of counties, including: Be tor, ordered plans prepared and bids asked for reconditioning hish- way SI from Odessa joutA to the Crane county line at an estimated cost of Glasseock and Sterling, reinstat- HIGHWAY, Tf, 12, IN FARM CONFISCATIONS- PRICE 5 CENTS Mexico Rejects U.S. Arbitration Replies 'No' To Demands For Payment Value Fixedjn American Property Losses MEXICO CITY, Aug. 3 _ (AP> Mexico today rejected the United States' proposal of July 21 to submit to. arbitra- tion "the question of Mexico's failure to indemnify American citizens whose farm lands she has expropriated since Aug. 30, 1927, PROPOSE DISCUSSION Instead, Mexico proposed two- party discussion of the issue, as- serting arbitration to be "unneces- sary" and "unlawful." A note handed njr Cordell Hull, United Stales secretary of stole, to the Mexican ambassa- dor In Washington, Francisco Casttllo N'ajera, July 21 admit- ted Meiico's right to expropri- ate, bnt Insisted upon prompt payment. Hull declared Inter- national law provided for this. Mexico's reply today, which Foreign Minister Eduardo Hay, handed io American Ambassador Josephus mnlels, heid that no prin- ciple of international law "univer- sally accepted In theory nor realized tn practice." made .obligatory the payment of Immediate compensa- tion, or even deferred compensation. for expropriations of a and Impersonal nature." s Secretary Hull stated that was the value placed by 'the owners on the small farm land prop- erties involved. Diplomats watched the farm "Might be set 'which later eooW be applied ta the more, import- ant question of Mexico's Bre March 18 of British and American oil eamaaBles' prop- erties .rained by them at Secretary Hull's note had deplor- ed the fact American landowners whose I'lalms cam; .under the juris- diction of the general claims com- mission set up In 1833 had not been asserting Mexico's teal to -carry forward" reforms should not affect such payments. LACKS MCMEY Mexico today ,sald she was dis- posed to negotiate en agreement to settle finally In a block the older claims, but stated flatly she did not intend to halt reforms because she lacked money to.pay owners for ex- propriated properties.. Expropriations for redistribu- tion of the land are "general and fmenonapl In the reply said, adding this "should be rerj ranch taken into account In order to understand Mexico's position and appraise See MEXICO, Tf. t. Col. 4 Tennessee Ballot BatHe Due Today NASHVILLE, Tenn., Aug. Tennessee's bitter political battle of personalities rather, thin Issues will be decided at the ballot bixes to- morrow with the democratic nomin- ations for governor, V. S. senator and public service commlssiner at stake. Highlighting the races is that for the gubernatorial nomination, with Gov. Gordon Browning, seeking in- dorsement for a second term, facing the determined opposition of National Commltteeman E. H. Crump and his Shelby county (Memphis) organization that for years has been all-powerful In Ten- nessee's most populous city. Crump Is backing Prentice Coop- er, Shelbyville attorney against Browning. Rabbits And Guinea Pigs Not Harmless ksutd warning today whl> stole fourteen guine ed n previous designation for ex- plgs and lwo rabbits from an expcr- Roaring over the capital twice ir, tending highway 15S from Garden lmcntal laboratory thai the animals a attack five bombers City to an Interaction with high- have Inoculated with three plunger] their cargoes squarely into dangerous menin- gitis and tubwitob. Memo For September Budget: New Post Office Safe IX3RAINE, Aug. September Is an unlucky month for Postmaster Cope. He ex- pects another vilst from the nemesis early in the ninth month. "Every September the safe In the postoiTlce Is said. "I've been buying new safes yearly and am tired of It. Two years ago a safe box was wrecked., Again last year. All yeggs have been captured. One group caught had 250 years In sentences hanging over them." The most recent attempt at safe breaking was several month.! ago when the strong box In the Hlgglnbotham Bartlelt Lumber office was attacked. The yegg left abruptly, leaving his _tools. Manager Roy Edwards 'thinks the perpetrator was an amateur living In Loraine. TOKYO REPORT Four Russian Battalions Halted ADVANCE STARTED IN DEEP FOG BUT JAP FLARES EXPOSE TROOPS Soviets Abandon tanks And Artillery As Nipponese Hold Fast, 200 Reported Dead SOAPBOX SLICKER Fourteen-year old Barton Bow- man in No 5 scoots the finish line winner in the Glass A divi- sion of the Philadelphia soap- derby Tbt rational finals are at Akron.-ib Aug 14 Russians threw four bat- Jgalnst changkufene and at p. in. Wednesday d.30 a. m., Abilene time) but met a repulse In which they lost 200 men, a Japanese army communique said today; Trie Russians advanced in a dense fog, Japanese their ranks were exposed when Japanese suddenly fired "thousands of flares" into the sky throwing a ghoulish light over the battle. The Soviets abandoned IS tanks and K pieces of light ar- adrieer from the front delated. Japanese'cismalUes-were Bok .'stated.'; The number of men In the three attacking not mated by the Japanese war of but It was said 250 tanks had been concentrated la the'Area by the red array forces; r :Thls.was .be part-j'pf the .rttafor cements which CpTTner border' zone facing'. and Minchoukuo. v WAR WANTED Despite the daily encounters. Jap- anese official'quarters Insisted they did not want a-genuine war with Russia. .yesterday. their army's.operations were purely defensive, and indica- tions she wants -to reach a peaceful settlement. _ OffIcUl elrtkj Declared Japan fullr prepared If necessary" aVJri repeated their stand that the coanr the Incident, most jeriooj in a font- series of border clashes, depended upon Russia. (Russia maintains she is de- fendlnf her territory and has not crotiMd the border.) With ,the Changkufeng area re- captured, authoritative sources said, Japan would not advance' further. Russia has contended that the ssc- tor Is-Soviet territory while Japan insists it Is a part of Manchcukuo. A4.Tices reaching Tokje said t tanks and motor SorrSes J'along tbe road between NoTOTrVsk and Fashbh throvfh the day, apparently In a con- centration of strength for an altetayt to recapture Changkaf- eni and Senaehofeni hills. A Korean army communique said Soviet Russian artillerymen con- tinued bombardment of the north- ern Korean town of Kojo from bat- teries across the Tumen river. JAPAN FFARS RAIDS The weather retarded aerial op- erations yesterday along the disput- ed border but several hundred miles away, across the Japan sea, night- fall brought fear of bomb attacks. Defense headquarters for the Japanese mainland issued orders darkening all outdoor llfhls In Tokyo, Tokobuma, Kobe and Osaka and' other cities and towns of eastern Japan. On the Asiatic mainland, the government of Korea ordered a blackout and defense measures throughout the northern area. Korean advices said residents ot villages In and near the battle zone were evacuating. Russia Ready For Emergency MOSCOW, Alig. officials 'declared'. today the' Soviet army's operations In clashes with Japanese on the Manchoukuoan border were purely defensive, but the public was'being prepared for the possibility of'a great emergency. There were indications Rus- sia wished to" reach a peaceful settlement even though a gov- ernment communique warned of possible "serious consequences" it Japanese "provocations" col- tinned. snowed no outward evidence of the crisis. However, newspapers, which for several days had printed only the briefest mention of Japanese-Rus- sian fighting near the Junction of Korea, Siberia and Manchouiuo, were crowded with reports o[ pa- triotic mass meetings, resolutions and letters to the editors from groups and Individuals promising loyalty to death in defense of ihe Soviet latherland's frontier. Both Pravda, communist party newspaper, and Izvestia, govern- ment organ, carried photosiatic copies of the Russian Chinese treaty maps of June 26. 18S6, show- ing the disputed Changkufe'ng heights as a part of Russian terri- tory. Insurgent Planes Raid On Barcelona BARCELONA, Aug. by the light of a new moon, ent planes raided Barcelona tonight to for the third time since bombing of the cathedral of Barcelona July 19. Roaring over the capital twice Ir the city, spreading destruction through many of the central streets Judge Sits On 'Hot Seat' NEW YORK, Aug. was aw- fully hot in New York today when Magistrate Frank Giorgio took the bench. The room re- gistered 00 degrees, The place was crowded and pretty soon it got degrees, in fact. Chief; cUrlj Marittr noti.ctd it, lop. Finally the magistrate halted a case, saying! "Find out what makes this place so hat." In the basement, Marker found a group of workmen stoking a roaring fire under a boiler they were installing. They had forgotten to turn off the heat registers in the courtroom, called a recess. Doctors To Aid In Farm Health Plan 'If physicians are establishing county health bureaus. their county medical society officials should meet a-ith FSA county staffs and make further said an announcement by a com- mlltej of PSA field workers. "FSA will make small loans to their clients for health service. Loans can be pooled, and doctors from 1 central fund. Each fam lly can use the doctor of agree u iupplles; keep its premises sanitary; hok lest drinking water .es end provide fi screen 'e dls- to net BOY REVIVED AFTER 'DEATH' Mysterious Man; Atop Standpipe Water Departrnent Feared He Mifght Rave Fallen In By MAUSHfK BOB Two little girls were mltUk- B. There wasn't a m in in the 88- foot at Fifth and Meander r Thei raunicipal water depart-" ii sure, because the gallons of water were drained cnt ot the tank last At 'the big the bottiim of. the tank was opened, arid Happy, of the'water department.., shoved himself iri through the opening that scarcely larger than his body Be threw-. out shcvels of thick -sedi- He pitched outran tin bucket. -Ntthlat he oat a ke emerttd bead first A pin wrinkled hi. mad-jUrakfd face. 'At Oat, it's tetter ta be UUB tmUttir he added, Uc (emtves jwioM afain.: the reason for all the activity Mt on the standpipe hill last nlgfct ft story excitedly told late Tuesday by two little girls who believed they saw a man on the top of the tower didn't see him. Just before "oiark Tuesday, in em- ploye ot the water department climbed the stand pipe but he eould find no evidence that anyone had, preceded him Then early yesterday Hippy Scoggin, who charge at towew, talked with the WUe igaiu "All Unei into the illm tower ven 30-inch majn, two igh pumps went ,wark ThU. in an effort tiree months, was. feeling fine after a doctor had revived him after hU had stopped jKatlng Th'e child's parents drote 30 miles an .hour.into a Chicago suburb to after they found the apparently lifeless child under' a blanket In the tear of thelfcar whertlhe had laden from the .The baby's Mrs Charles II Didier, is hold-' Ing him. Says State Rail Rates Too High EL PASO, Aug. showing that Interstate class rates of car- riers between Phoenix and El Paso and between Albuquerque and El Paso lower than present Intra- slite rites, inc.udtag the recent 10 per cent Increase, was developed Wednesday during the Interstate commerce commission hearing by R. C. Flilbrlghl, Washington and Houston attorney, representing the El Paio chambei of commerce. El Pajo freight bureau and West Tex- as chamber of commerce. Harry E. North, assistant traffic manager of the El Paso freight bureau. lortiflert with extensive ex- hibits covering the rate situation was tht witness from whom Ful- brlght elicited differences In charg- COLLEGE STATION. Aug. 3.-W7 Fulbright Indicated he Intended to make much of that angle in the In rates which was ------_rf railroad com- mission. The present hearing is an of ihe request Ihe car- rier .nade on the ICC to Issue a marxlatory order putting that in- crease Into elfcct [o conform to the 10 per ctnt Increase In Interstate rales recently authorlMd by the ICC. Attorneys assured P. M. Weaver, ICC examiner, and C. R. McNamee, director o! the bureau ot traffic for Thursdaj, by noon ft third hearing jr the carriers' pro- posal to Increase rates In differ- ential territory win be at Defended For Flood Work Two m.embere-of the Lower Colo- rado liver authority board of di- rectors were among the heaviest losers when deluged lower reaches of the .river valley recently, according to C R Pen- nington of Abilene, member of the board. Pcnninglon arrived in Abilens afternoon after spend- ing several days' in Austin, head- quarters for investigations tat a the flood. He stoutly defended the'ctlo- rado aulhm-ity for 'any tn cause or failure U prerent the flood, ai famen on the lower Colorado ftare charrti. "Fritz Englehart, chairman of -'the CRA, ;os> 8S per centVoi, the crop on his farm on the saM Penntogton. "Another member, Jack HutciiliM.of Pierce, said acre have prevented it." Peor.mgton pointed out that the Slack, authority had the threefold pur- pose of controlling floods, selling water for Irrigation, and develop- ment of power. "We led we have been carry- ing out the program in accord- ance wllh state Uws and our contract wilt the federal IOT- said the Abilene man. "We invited Secretary Mces to investigate the situation tren before he ordered this "Some people got the We a that we promlre-l that there would be no more flooctv said Pennlngton. "This is not so. And eren so. our work Is hardly half complete, Mar- the lower Colorado to bu.'Ming levtf' The ;Job, only thwe bours, wu comptetM late lastnigiifc- at that, score of ettri- ous persobj gatsered, many of them from-homes four-block area ?Jwie water srcsaitr cutoff T t, A btock iwmy, at vice tbe two little girls but cmaldn was too much, tfflslon In the air u they repeaUrt. thefr atory and as water 'rom nearby fire hydrant flooded street Tfiere were nerYous aMd excited whispers The: children are nine-year-old Winnie Hat Bool, and her cousin, Dorothy Uarfe Walls, Beth are living in the home ot their grandmother. Mrs. B. Bond were by the side of that bnefc buUdiag, .ott c' out in the street.' Winnie "Wr tor num. up wu up at the top of the ladder'Then it looted like tell She shook her light brown pWts and eyes were round and serious, "It feefctd like a man n eo" brwolnj- iirti jtflow locks eat Kennedy of the ranch he in Mata- Bond, brother ot Winnie stuck; gordia and Wiirton counties were his head iround the door, trying to flooded. hide his night clothes, "it was "It Is not reasonable to think that tie had on a black suit and; these men would have.allowed their blaci haV'-he I.think own cnps to be ruined if they could he climbed down." The girk couflrm nrmjontaX it Me itw.li IL __ _ his statement that the man wore What dU they do thenT They ran hMM as fast as they and Mi Dorothy Marie's T, Mrj. t. K. She tit- UAt they leU Saa' a the fce rooH notify authorises. "It's a children's story, and child- ren do have said Mrs. Bond, -por that reason. It cannot oe accepted as but ths children, regardless did right In saw." other than the venience to resi b ln {our Noclu without e. ar- shall Ford dam Is not yet in use did not Interrupt water ?tt- anci It is to be the main unit tri vlce- The pressure remained ua- ncod ccntrol. We have surveyed Scogin, because the o river prtlimin- oorthjtde tower tank was WU. The the flood control standpipe on the hill beside 85-fcot tower, has a opacity of "1 wou'd also like to point out JW.OOO gallons of water, and was 15- that rnui-n of the water in Ihe low- deep late yesterday. Pumps er co.oiado camL from the Peder- had bein going all day, and one nalts ii.-J Llano livers, entering the plant still was pumping last Colorado below" Buchanan dam and therefore out of our control." The Abilene man will return to LlflC PfOraHon Austin iaunday. _ Looms For KM A Pool WICHITA ISnt proriUoii'' was the north Search Fruitless WASHINGTON. Aug. 3. (fl oil man's interpretation of ac- eir Admiral George J. Myers, re- tlon today the Texas Pipe Line ported to the navy that the search company to reduce lu takings in the> for the musing Pan American Clip- fltld, the wlcblta rails Rjcord P" was. fruitless again todiy. Neils' will jajr Taursdij   

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