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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: August 2, 1938 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 2, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               WIST O MEWSMPER gttrilew VOL. LVIIl, NO. 65. "WITHOUT, OR WITH OFFENSE TO PRILNDS OR FOES WE YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT fun (if, ABILENE, TEXAS. TUESDAY MORNING, AUGUST 2, 1938. CUM turn Cliri PRICE 5 CENTS SEE ANY SCARS? Professor Lost In Atlantic After Attack On Wife Seaman Saves Woman From Husband As He Attempts To Throw Her Overboard NEW YORK, tragedy of the high the story of a young college professor who vanished 450 miles out in the 'dark Atlantic after attempting to hurl his wife over- reported officially today by officers of the French liner Normandie when the ship docked here. Dr. Robert Moore Duncan, 35, as- sistant profe.isor' of polllics at Col- Bale university, disappeared from the wind-swept boat deck of the palatial ship Sunday night, said Henry VJIIar, the Normandle'e pur- ser. His wire Alice, 36. daughter of a longtime of John D. Rockefeller, Jr., was lorn from her husband's grasp by a seaman who overheard them in a violent argu- rneht, Ihc purser said, as Duncan "attempted to throw her over the Bruised and cut head and lace, Mrs, Duncan, mother of two small children, arrived In the ship's hospital at the end of 4 six- weeks trip that started as a sum- mer holiday cruise. "When Mrs. Duncan was re- said Villir, "the tint thing she said was. 'get my husband, lie h going 'to commit suicide.'" The United. States attorney .was nolliltd and will conduct an in- quiry, Mrs. Duncan's falhcr, Wllltrd Samuel Richardson, a former Bap- list minister who has been associ- ated with Rockefeller In philan- thropic and educational work since 1912. was notified. He requested lhat Interviewers not be allowed to see his daughter and she was taken from the ship in private automobile with New Jcrssy licence plates. Mr. and Mrs. Duncan left New York June 25 for a north Cape cruise and boarded the Normandie at Southampton, England, for the return. The Normandie was about <50 miles from New York when, Vlllar said- "Just before midnight last night Mr. and Mrs. Duncan were walking on the boat cldck. At a point Just beneath the bridge they stopped and began on argument. "Duncan grabbed hit wife by the hit her several limes over the head, apparent- ly with some Instrument, knock- ed her unconscious and attempt- ed to throw her over the iMe. "A seaman, Joseph Brouard, heard the argument and went down In Set PROFESSOR, t, Col ..Adi Leonard's-beauty-appir-- for the audiences who '-v alcti he r "dig nlfled strip tease" act. Becaase she preferred death to an ad-, dominal scar, the old dancer refused to undergo an operation in Chicago after her appendix burst.- Sho is e'xpected to recover.- Stonewall Well Flows 365 Bbls. Responds To Experimental Treatment With 500 Gallons Of Acid Solution Owners ot Ihe Stonewall Oil Company No. 1 H. T. Carlile northwest- em Stonewall county wildcat five miles north of Peacock decided Mon- day to turn In a potential gauge of 365 barrels on the well to the railroad commission, that office reported. A. G. Swanson, Abilene, of the Stonewall Oil company, said the well had mnde that amount of oil in iqht Rates Hike Protested EL PASO, advances In rates will take addi- tional traffic from rail carriers and bestow It on a steadily mounting trucking business. That was the testimony of shippers Monday at the opening of a hearing before P. St. Weaver, interstate commerce commissioner, and C. H. McNamee, director of Ihe bureau of traffic for the Texas railroad commission. One witness summed It up by say- Ing increased freight rates did not always mean increased revenues. Another witness expressed the fear that If rail rates were increased, Inick rates also would be advanced. The hearing was adjourned at p. m, to be resumed Tuesday morning. The first day's session of the fight that is being made by the El Paso chamber of commerce, the El Paso freight bureau and West Texas chamber of commerce against the request ot rail carriers for the ICC Issue a mandatory order requiring the TRC to put Into effect Intraslale rates In differential territory lo conform with Interstate advances author- ized last May by the ICC, devel- oped among olhcr ihfngs, a grow- ing popularity among shippers lor irucks as medium o( transporta- tion. Jobbers of fruit and vege- tables spoXe highly ol the service by trucks and thoie that wr.'fn ics lo keep con- tents fresh. Shippers of cattle and sheep dlso spoke a good word for trucks. Tsrry Stays Dry BfiOW.VFIELD. Aug. l-W- Terry tiwnty voleri ilmost 3 to t the dt teer. unofficial tJ levy's election Indl- Ca'i'd. small ow.5 '-'n! v-v's T.'.S Mi for 1-ccr H houis of flow following an ex- perimental treatment with 500 gal- lons ot acid Sunday afternoon. FlOW INCREASED Swanson said the well responded with a greatly Increased flow alter It was opened from the small acid dose, to make 64 barrels of oil the first houi and 42 barrels the second hour through tubing. Thereafter it declined in rate of output, and In the first five hours It produced 1S3 barrels of oil, an average of approximately (0 barrels hourly. During the next nine hours, the well produced 167 baireis of ol! or a total of 365 barrels for the first H hours. It was then shut down. A previous pumping and flow- Ing gauge last weekend, Swa son said, netted 176 barrels of oil In 24 hours, Ihc well flow- ing by heads on agitation from (he pump. No crude Is being sold from the well, and It Is likely additional stor- age will be moved lo the lease. Production is from the soft lime correlated as the Palo Pinto, basal Canyon, trom which the Avoca field is producing. Saturation was drilled from to feet, lotal depth. The wildcat opens the most norJiwejIerly production in the Weot Central Texas district and the first Held for Stonevtalt county. It Is located. In section 233, block D, survey. Swanson said the only required offset was to ihe souti and that it would probably be drilled In early fall. Texas Pacific CM.} k com- pany ot Port Worth reported Monday to be preparing lo move in rig and maleriais for an outpost to Ihe soulhern Hafkell county Pardue pool, to the east and north of the discovery. Forest Development Cor- poration and J. McMlllen No. 1 A. E. Pardue, six miles northeast of Stamford Northwestern Coleman coun- ty's Strawn wnd discovery, the H. 0. Wooten and associates' So. I W. R. Slockard, a mile norlhwrst of Xorice, was slated for a small nitrntljccrln shot tate Monday night. Section to be shot was the upper II o! sand body show- OH, t Clark Bids For '40 Nomination lo Presidency Demo Primaries Hold Attention In Other States WASHINGTON, Aug. 1 Bennett Champ Clark of Missouri, a foe of many administration measures, is bidding tomorrow for a thumping renomination major- ity and a chance at the demo- cratic presidential nomination in 1940. ELECTION WATCHED A primary sweep for the son of the famous democratic house leader, who came near winning the presi- dential nomination from Woodrow Wilson In 1912, would Increase talk among anti-Roosevelt democrats of putting him forward In "W as a "compromise" candidate lo slop the New Deal's man whoever he may be. That makes the size 01' Clark's vote a matter of widespread In- terest In tomorrow's numerous elections, which Include primary Tolin; In Kansas, Virginia and West Virginia a  had been 'str-ngly rebuffed" at Lake ChanchI near the Junc- ture of the frontiers of Japanese Korea. The Soviet repot t said great losses of men and materials were Inflicted on the'Japanese. Apparently Soviet circles were not apprehensive over the possibility of the outbreak becoming the nal for a large-scale conflict between the Soviet Union snd -Japan. At the Khabarovsk'meeting the workers declared the title of citizen of the far east must .become synonymous with fearlessness and must, mean its bearer "is trained for military duty and Is ready to defend the frontiers." In Moscow Ihe newspaper Consomol Pravda give prominent space to a letter from young workers laud- Ing Ihe frontier guards "who died bravely defending the Lake Chancht territory." "We ire peaceful uld the letter, "but our memory Is good. We will remember the address ct your murderers." AFTER DARING JAILBREAK- Police Trail East Texas Fugitive Police Fire Into Crowd, Injuring 36 As Ship Docks HILO, Hawalt, Aug. 1. Bloody fighting between police and waterfront strikers resulted In the Injury of 36 persons today, live of them critically amid showers of buckshot and the use of at least one bayonet. Two women were among those slightly injured. A loncsbore- men was stabbed in the side with a bayonet. Seven! others were peppered about the head >nd face with buckshot. II wu the worst, riot In Hilo's modern history. The disorder was precipitated by arrival from Honolulu of the steam- ship Walaleale, operated by the In- ter-Island Navigation company against which longshoremen called a strike May 21 when contract neg- otiations collapsed. Pour ships of the company were tied up until 10 days ago, when the Waialeale arrived here in defiance of the strike, precipitating a previ- ous riot in which three children were trampled. Today's flghlinff started when pickets pushed beyond police lines as the steamer docked af- ter police had promised to lake "whatever steps are necessary" to maintain order. Authorities estimated 500 strike sympathizers were In the crowd against which tear gas and fire hoses first were directed without avail. When the crowd had advanced to within 10 yards ol the boat, police opened fire with Officers declared they fired only at the legs of the advancing strikers, who wit- nesses declared were unarmed. A couple of the law's "itronf" arms went eat Monday to raid ihe premises ot an Abilene negro wo- Upon itvint BKk> SiMey, 'cblet 'lie Theo Ash ''told Ibe effieer: "Ruck, she's a little salty. She'd just M soon wrap hiteftet around your neck." Slbley 'scoffed.' He and Deputy P. A. DOtz, who Jj M brawny the (round (roans under him, went out lo the nefro place. They were bootler beverain and W negro baby that did not belong there. The negro woman, Blamie Rob- inson, formerly Blunle ChitmiD, greeted them wllh a man shed oatb. There .wai a riot. The officers had one gun, one bUek-luk, be- tween them. Soon the entered wo- man ccaftoated the And with .her bare hanfe ihrinttf well' t feat f onws Place ged her U sereaintnff, Oery with Mood, Sibleywent lo the county at- taraey'i office. In court they filed complaint  stra- tegic "Bluff of miles south of Teruel today, orcing insurgent Generalissimo 'rarteisco Franco to horry yoopi from other fronts to de- 'end his Teruel iines. Dispatches from both sides' igreed that Miaja's moves were "de- signed to capture the Insurgents off-guard at the moment they were using every available man to pro- tect Ganrtesa, 100 'miles northeast of Teruel, against government of- 'inslves from Catalonia. In tatuUnl Cowh with ttmmmim new Gui- de" on the river front, Gen. Mlaja ordered a sodden attack from the tooth which re- nlted In capture of the W( h promontory Caaurena domi- nating dmen Ttllafei awj few miles to the. north. The advance brought goierruient guns within ten miles of Teruel, capital of the province of Teruel, which the government seised and ost less than she months ago. The success of this surprise at- tack forced Insurgent field com- manders In Ihe Tehielarea to de- mand reinforcements to protect not only insurgent positions along the Teruel-Sagum highway the, but the city of-Teruel itself Ctmarena Li six miles southwest of the highway. There was Intense activity behind both fronts during the lufc 43 hours. The government wu transferring men and material across tile Zbro Into the newly-conquered zone be- fore General Frueo wu trrtac defend kttfa Tend Ekra Meton, at .the 
                            

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