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Abilene Reporter News: Thursday, July 28, 1938 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - July 28, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               WEST TEXAS? OWM NEWSPAPER Abilene Reporter OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT VOL. LVIII, NO. 60. Tntt itrt ABILENE, TEXAS. THURSDAY MORNING, JULY 28, PAGES (IH PRICE 5 CENTS Druggists Ask O'DanielToBe Conclave Guest Telegram Sent By Abilene Chairman For August Meet W. Lee O'Danlel, the Fort Worth flour merchant who Is to become governor ol Texas in been extened an urgent invitation to be on of the principle speakers at the semi-annual coventlon of the West Texas Druggists associa- tion In Abilene August 16, 11 and 18, Frank Myers, chairman of the program committee, announced last night. The following telegram has been dlsatchcd to O'Danlel: Hon. Vf. Lee O'Daniel, next gov- ernor of Texas. Fort Worth, Texas. Dear Governor: West Texas Druggists associa- tion, comprising all territory In- cluding Tarrant county west of Fort Worth, metis in Abilene August 16, 17 and 18. We want you to deliver the principal address at the drug- gists banquet on evening of Wednesday, August 17. We urge ten to accept this invitation and meet man? of your friends In West Texas. Five hundred drugcrisfs expected to attend. Frank Myers, chairman program committee. In addition to sending the tele- gram, officials of the druggists as- sociation have communicated twice with Gov. James V. Allred. enlist- ing his assistance in getting his successor to attend the meeting urge O'Daniel to accept. Hotel Hil- ton has advised O'Daniel that a of rooms has been reserved for his use during the convention. Myers states that every effort possible will be made to induce the gubernatorial nominee to come to Abilene for Uie druggists conven- evidently Is inter- ested in developing the state's busi- ness and Industrial interests and I feel confident that he will be with us in Myers states. Another highlight of the drug- gists convention will an ad- dress by Hon. Wright Pittmin of Texarkana, co-sponsor of the fair trade bill during the last session of the TJnittd States congress. Pattman" will the fair trade bill the after- noon session Wednesday, Aug- ust 11. This session will be open to a'.i independent merchants of and West Texas in that the fair trade bill Is of viUV interest to them. Rep. Josh Lee of Oklahoma, an- other orator of note, as well as being a national figure, has been invited to address the druggists See DRUGGISTS. Pg. 12, Col. 5 NEW ANSON C OF C PRESIDENT Murry Hudson, left ,took over duties as president of the An- son chamber of commerce for the next 12 months just as the Reporter News photographer snapped this picture. Handing over the eavcl Is Burl Scott, retiring president. The occasion was at the annual banquet held at Anson Tuesday night. Snake Killer- ODDITIES Goes Boom WHITE OAKS, N. M., July Hutter's dynamite and blasting caps were damp so he set them on a windowsill in the sun and went to bed for a short siesta. He awoke still abed, but in his backyard, with fragments of his house raining all around him. Neighbors found Hutter, 58-year-old miner, mildly dazed, bruised and scratched. The house was demolished and many windows in this little "ghost town" were smashed. Hutter said he figured the caps had been heated by the sun and exploded, detonating nearly 50 pounds of dynamite. The miner and his bed were Mown bodily out the back wall. CLEVELAND, July small boys and a jirl were playing today when they decided to a rave in the embankment along a rapid transit tracks. Thret boys and the girl were smothered to death when ten tons of sand collapsed on them, a fourth boy, believed dying, was taken to hospital. WPA Help For Phantom Dam Emergency Order Received After Damage By Flood- Emergency WPA work order for Immediate repairs and completion of the spillway at Port Phantom Hill dam received in the Abi- lene WPA office yesterday. The new order provides tor in federal fun'ds for placing rock, rip- rapping, sodding, and otherwise strengthening the spillway of the new lake. Request for the emergency order was wired lo the state WPA office at San Antonio Monday afternoon D, C. Roscrs. area WPA en- gineer, and R. C. Hoppe. engineer in charge of the reservoir work, had discussed the condition ol the spill- way. The high water caused by the unusually heavy rains last week had caused some erosion on Ihe spill- way and threatened serious danger to the structure if more rain should fall. In view of this fact, the re- quest for emergency work order was made and granted. The project will employ approxi- mately 150 men and require ft month or more for completion, Hoppe said. The work Is to begin as soon as the ground dries out a little, probably Friday. Hoppe pointed out that the rip- rapping and strengthening work would have had to be done before the dam was completed. The emer- gency order simply moves this part of the construction work ahead of schedule' TROUP, Tei., July Voyt Haj- ertj- today saw a brown snake and chopped its head off with an aie so It would not bile anyone. Tht head stuck to the blafe. The youth sought to brush H off with his hand. It snapped and Voyt was treated for i copperhead bite. July B. BO, popped up in-bed, snatched a pistol from under his pillow and blazed away at some shadows in his small grocery before dawn today. His heart pumped wildly as he hit one of them squarely m the middle and down it- went. He called police-. negroes crawled he excitedly'told police as they reached his still darkened store. "I shot one he is over there. The cops turned on the lights and found a neat bullet hole plugged through a sack of flour. Knhn handed the cops his pistol and said he must have been dreaming and went back to bed. Flood Victims Blame Colorado River Authority Ask Restitution For Damage Done To Valley Crops By The Associated Press Criticism of angry landowners fell on the Colorado Valley Author- ity Wednesday as Texas, in the throes of flood waters which smashed worth of live- stock, crops nnd property, bracec Itself for fresh attacks. As the Rio Orande, choked with drainage water from Mexico's plains, tumbled down toward the valley in rapid rises, the Fayctte county agricultural association, in messages to President Roosevelt and other men of state, called the Colorado river flood "man made' and asked "restitution of some kind to be made by the government." TO INVESTIGATE Other organizations and indi viduals planned investigations. Near LaGrange, the Coloradi battered down a pier and the sec ondary span of the old river bridge recently repaired at a cost of 000. The crash could be heard i Ihe business district, only six block away. The city was cut off fron the structure tiy five feet, of wate coursing over the highway. The county agricultural associa lion, in its communications to th president, Senators Connally an Shcppard, Rep. J. J. Mansfield, an the chairman of the Colorado Val ley Authority, said it believed wate turned out of Buchanan lake cans ed Ihe flood waters to reach hlghe stages "and giving us less time t bring cattle and feed crops t safety." CREDIT EXHAUSTED It said "many of us have ex ousted our credit producing th rop which now is lost. We ask tha estitution of some kind be made- ay the government to those of ui .long the river who are not able to urry on by remaining on theii arms." The telegram was signed by C T. Kaspcr, chairman of the associa- ion, and Max CHzler, secretary. At Dallas, Fritz Engelhard, chair- man of the Colorado River Author- ty, denied the floods were "mar, made.'1 "The flood was just one of tho.se :hingSj" he said. "When a flood comes along Ihe people feel thai :hey have to blame somebody. HEATER FLOOD "But the flood waters that came down were greater than in 1935. or 1336 and the flood stage was lowei As a matter of fact, if the dam had not been there, with the amount of water it absorbed, the flood would lave been much more severe." "As a matter of fact the program of the Colorado River Authority calls for six tarns, two of which Sec FLOODS, Pg. 12, Col. 4 Expansion For 'Pump Priming' Program Offered Through RFC PWA Loans To Be Handled By Jones Agency KENT N. y.. July weeks a faint buzzing she discovere the bedroom ceiling was honey. Mrs. Gerald covcll noticed A the liquid oozing through is bcr.s in the attic but the Covellr I3Se Pan the and nlove a to get, rid of Tne Covells are having honey lor supper. pickjcrt "n lhe bird'5 was the unsigned, unaddresscd message: "Mother I arrived safely in Buffalo." Famous Southern Chemist is Dead SAVANNAH. Ga July Dr. Charles H. Herty. whose de- velopment of a process for making newsprint from slash pine sUrled new southern industry, died In a hospital here today of a heaa ail- ment. was 71. NEW YORK. July Lincoln Ellsworth, who says would rather live on a desert than in modern city, sailed today today on the liner Europa for his fourth expedition inlo an- tarctic wastes. The wealthy explorer, who has flown over both the South nnd NorUi poles, said he "nev- er could stand" crowds. "People who live in the wild- erness have a sense of he said. TUCUMCARI. N. XI., July 27 Scoglio, 26-year- old New Yorker, wanted a ride, but the freight trains wouldn't stop. He placed a heavy wood- en tie on Ihe tracks. The next train stopped and picked him up. all rishl. He was brought to Tticumcari, where he pleaded guilly to the act today and was bound to district court for sentencing. The train wasn't damaged. l''i.Waf- crossinS, bridge with trn compan- ions on a job-huntint expedition when someone dared htm to dive into the tlvcr and swim to pier about a thousand feet awav He accepted, jumped and swam almost lo his And drowned. CROATAN. N. C., July Hsywood said that not a day ha. -A year ago today Tom W. Hay- gone by that someone has wood set up in front of his tilling strode over to the machine station here a kicking machine avenged himself for some real o which would supply a boot in the fancied wronj. This has worn out pants lo anyone turning the crank four shoelaces onto the metal "leg" -no questions asked, that does the business. On this-first anniversary of his When Hnywood first set the strange device today Haywood an- macWnc out R 0" lit te nounced mprovements in the origi- more than a handle wMch when nal model but said the fundamental tltr_ principle Is unchanged. turncd- Pullwl cable that operated "My Haywood said, "is a rod wearing a Urge shoe. the answer to those thousands of Improvements announced today in- persons who say every day, 'Well I eluded addition of a roof over the ought lo have a good swift kick.' device and "technical changes." Shackelford Picks Holland Sheriff John A. Holland won election as sheriff and lax rollcclor of Shackelford county without necessity of a run-off, unnfft-. cial relurns showed. Holland polled voles lo a total of for tiro oppuncnls. Isabel! polled 545 and Hudman 457. In Tuesday afternoon's Re- portcr-Xews a typographical rr- rnr caused Holland's vole (o be published "109" Instead of "1.029." In the Shackelford county treasurer's race Roy Tusgle, the Incumbent, polled 477 votes In- stead of 457 as published. Black received 802 and Fronie Claus- sell 751, the lalttr two jolnj into the run-off. The Weather 'COME IN, JOHN, WE LOVE YOU' "Come in, John, we love pleaded Mrs. Katherine Bull with a man Identified as John Wardc as he hugged the build- ing while standing on a ledge 17 stories up on a. New York hotel. Mrs. Bull, rope tied around her, heard him say, "Go back or I'll jump." She returned to her room and faint- ed. He jumped. 'Man On The Ledge' Alone In Solitude Of Morgue Bj ROGER GREENE NEW YORK July Warde. 26, the nerve-sick "man on the central figure !n Manhattan's most spectacular delayed tulcldc, was alone tonight In the solitude of an east side funeral parlor. The 11-hour carnival of death that gripped thous- ands of New Yorkers in agonizing last night with hts plunge rrom the nth floor of the Gotham hotel, was ended. No one called to'identify his shattered, remains. No disposition was made for the body. In the aftermath of-the strange case, enacted amid a stage-setting of skyscrapers, neck-craning thous- ands, clicking newsreel cameras, magnesium Jiares, fainting women and even a television pickup, medical experts joined the man in the street trying to answer the question: "Why did he do way he did Dr. A. Arden Brill phychiatrist, and disciple of Freud, Columbia university lecturer on psycho-sexual science, Interpreted Warde's prolonged debate with death as the manifestation of a schiiold-mantsc. "He was not a maniac-depressive." Dr. Brill said. "That type gets moods of exultation followed by moods of the darkest depression. In the secondary, hang-over mood, maniac type would not hesitate. He would walk to the window and leap." Another expert opinion came from Dr. Joseph Jas- trow. New York psychologist, who pictured young self-embittered failure, the youth who had never dominated anyone, whose every venture In life seemed doomed to enjoying a final hour of triumph. "He.stood up there alone, looking down oh the great crowds nominating scene at he said. "The crowds did not scare him. He enjoyed It He was perfectly self-centered and self-confident." He lingered for hours, towering over the weird life- and-dealh spectacle of hfs own creation, until R plan to trap catch him in a giant net and pin him against the side of Ihe huildlne like a but- him to step off Into r-pace. AT NLRB Anil.rvr and Thnnitay. OKLAHOMA: nnrth pflrllor FAST TEXAS: 1'srlty rloiiily. s nrar )hc Tipjwr am] I'rJrtaj. .Mixing If iin WrST TI-XAs! 'Omrrull, f.ilr day Friday 
                            

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