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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: June 24, 1938 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - June 24, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               WEST TEXAS' 0WM HiWSMKR VOL. LVI1I, No. 27. AM4KU "WITHOUT, OR WITH OWENSK TO 1W1-.NDS OR FOES WE .SKETCH VOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT ABILENE, TEXAS. FRIDAY MORNHNG, JUNE 24, 1938-SIXTEEN G TWO ATTORNEYS SLAIN IN COURT PRICE 5 CENTS Surrounded by investigators checking over the scene, the bodies of R. D. Mclaughlin (on floor) and J. Irving Hancock (in chair at extreme left) at- torneys slain In a las Anjeles courtroom, are shown a few minutes after the shooting. A man who Identified himself as Arthur Emll Hansen, 33, was held as the killer. DRASTIC Japan Tightens Economy Impose Plan To Support War Tokyo Declares Determination To Crush Chinese TOKYO. June gov- ernment imposed a drastic war time economy plan on the nation today and pledged itself to win the war in China regardless of the time It would take. The retrenchment program is ex- pected to be., put-into .operation July 15 under a law which places the life and property of the lowliest citizen as well as the greatest cor- poration in government hands dur- ing "time of war or national emer- gency.'1 PRIORITY TO AR.1IS The new program, called "mobili- zation of was announc- ed as "giving priority to the supply of arms, ammunition and export materials." In l long statement which was a preamble to the official de- crees, Ihc r.ibincl expressed its determination to crush 1 h c Chinese government regardless of (he length of hostilities. The government's announcement, declaring "the ultimtae end of the current incident (the Chinese-Jap- anese war) still is very said the inevitability of protracted war- fare necessitated further economic control. Included in [he program were: Consumption Restricted use of metals, chemicals, oils, gasoline, rub- ber, cotton, wool, linen, leather nnd lumber and more intensive use of synthetic materials. Foreign curtail- ment of exports, except war supplies snd material necessary for exports, and reconstruction of export trade', including relaxation of the import control law to allow importation of ray materials to be made into ex- portable articles. Prices and of commodity prices to halt the cur- rent -upward trend niid promotion of thrift among the people by which an estimated would be saved tu 1333. Rebel Drive On Valencia Broken HENDAYE. franco (At the Span- ish June ish government dispatches said to- night, Ihe insurgent offensive against Valencia, former provision- al cnpilal. had been broken. They reported that on both wings of Hie front In eastern Spain, be- low Caitelkm de La Plans and Teruc-l. government defenses with- stood ItwtinrenC assaults. EXPENSIVE MANY ILL AND ABSENT AS COURT LEVIES FINES SICKNESS court attacncs Into an epidemic of some sort Ihurschy when attempting to clear a, batch of liquor cases off the docket CaSCS77? the day, other defendants' to court witness pleading they were too ill to come ccurt lras Dr- Edward H'untcl. His health cost 51-l.Ja as he pleade.1 Euilly to writing two prescriptions for liouor ln onc   EAST I rtanrly raltrrM f.rnltr Ohl Uli 11 31 mariner portion mint I 3 II nn'i (fl S !U nti.l 71: flair .-.TO !f afrl IF. mini lit tmlaj, lucid tomi, Suspect Held In Westex Death MONAHANS. June Authorities said tortoy th.it a Mon- ahans man hart made a statement In connection with the death last night of Jess Barnelt, 5i, of East- land. 'Hie man being held Mid that Barnelt was rooming at his home. The suspect s.iid that Barnett en- tered the back door with a hnlt- g.illon can of gasoline which he threw on the floor. Then the as- pect saw that Barnett ii.id a in his hand, and feared that bar- nclt was going to tot fire lo the gasoline. Officers fatd that Ihc suspect Uld them he hit Barnett with a halclie', in order lo prevent his slarlins a fire. EASTLAND, June Jess Bamctt. slain last nielit at Mon- nluins, known in Eastlanci as a veteran oil field worker. in Eastland he was of producllon and drilling (or the Hoot-Rhortes Oil company. emergency agency, swung into the fccond day of President Roosevelt's wnamg-spendlns program. municipal constructions of schools, bridges and olher Tills brouglu the two-day total of allotments to PROJECTS READY Ickes told reporters that because PWA had sluriied many projects it had 3.000 of them ready lo go "the moment congress and the president gave us the If PWA were made permanent, he said, it could be ready for similar quick action in any future depres- sions. "The way lie have started tills piosr.im convinces me that we should always have a back- Io.? of lie said. Ickes emphasized that applicants must act quickly to get results for loans and grants aproved within Sec PWA. Tg. 16, Col. 6 Thompson Promises Soil Conservation BEEVILLE, June Thompson promised to "conserve Texas soil as we have conserved our oil" In a campaign speech, to rancher; and farmers here. Thomp- son was honor guest al a barbecue at the ranch of Sheriff Ira Heard of licfuglo county. Even Mussolini Eats it, Befcha MILAN. June mier Mussolini's Popolo D'ltal- ian answered Italians' com- plaints over coarse oread today with Ihe assertion It was better for health and manly vigor. The new bread gov- ernment flour con- taining 20 per cent corn flour or other substitutes because of Italy's diminished wheat crop and self-sufficiency program was compared by the newspaper to the bread the world-conquer- ing ancient Romans ate. Testimony Ends In School Blast Trial HENDERSON, June defense asked fin Instructed verdict today In the case of Walter Harris ngamsl the Parade Gasoline Co., et al, suit for S2.950 damages in connection with the death of 12- year-old James Harris in the New London school plant. Court recessed unlil tomorrow when a ruling Is expected on the defense motion for Instructed ver   inform- ri! opinion here, is (o siimiil.ilr an tronomic iinhirn brforc tlic November elections, and also lo offset aiiti-ncir deal political frcnrls from strife with- in Hie democratic p.irfy. Republican spokesmen nnd even democrats critical of Roose- velt jwliclrs have c.iilcd the 1937- 38 slump Ihe "Rooscvcli depression." Backr.1 by Ihc multi- billion dollar relief and pump-prim- ing measure. Roosevelt appears lo be embarking on a trans-continental campaign to convince the country that Another period of recovery1 Is at hand. Roosevelt's speech at o'clock. Eastern Standard Time, tomorrow night. Is expected to be devoted es- pecially to an exposition of the Icnd- ing-spcndinir program. Dciwecn Uie lime of that speech, and the presi- dent's embarkation on the west coa.tt July 12 (or a fishing cruise home, he will be front page news almost every day. He nill be heard nationally and seen locally from New York lo Snn Francisco over a zlij-zng course that win take him 1inlo a dozen slates. A new chapter of new dr-il history may he nriKcn by Ihe prcsfdcnl In Ihat Ihrce wftks nr sn. All Indications point to- ward the redefinition of Roose- velt policies, forcltn and domrj- lic. during tills off-jcar political tour. Discussion of the president's west- ern Itinerary has turned mostly on the direct polilical M he may give to new deal senators engaged in re- nomination light.'; in Kentucky, Ok- lahoma, Wisconsin. California or die where along the way. The of his journey conforms loo closely to )Mrty trouble spots to avoid the conclusion that'll MS shaped with Uial in mind. FIVE SERIOUSLY INJURED- FARMER O'NEAL ADVERTISES H.: F. O'Neal, farmer living near Noblesvllle, Ind., makes no secret'.'bf his opposition to the Agricultural Adjustment Ad- ministration. The sign he Is shown with is on the front gate of his farm and warns AAA agents to keep off his land. NINE DROWN AS CLOUDBURST FLOODS MONTANA COULEES Infant Missing; Floodwaters Trap Residents, Ruin Buildings, Homes i' Nine persons drowned and a baby issing tonight In cloudburst Headwaters that surged Into north- central Montana rivers out of normally dry coulees and gulches Farmers evacuated their homes In the valley fiats of the Milk river, swollen by the coulee, torrents. The towns of Malta and Harlem built bulwarks against the advancing floodstream -nauem uuiit Searchers found the bodies of eight flood victims In Gravelley coulee la redo, 12 miles south Offer Benefit Show Tonight To Cast On Eve Additions Made Of Performance trapped -Emll De HMIW, hi. three itrA and Charfci Frail, fanner; Herman JUKI Mlaa., employed retently on De Hahha' -farm. An Infant, another daughter of the De Haans, still was missing. ryed TiHghman, 60, of Hogeland, a-rfarm security worker drowned Committeemen of the Abilene near Zurich, 16 miles east of Havre Traveling Men's association will ,be Sheriff C. B. Reser of Chinook said loosing for everything from nails Tillghman, a 250-pound man was Tft Aalpsnum fnHa.r ac nllt ___ j to salesmen today as they put finishing touches on preparations' for the opening of their 49ers char- ity show tonight about First call Is for a meeting of every traveling Tnan in Abilene, whether or not he is a member of the association, at the Ouitar build- ing. South First and Cedar, at 9 o'clock this morning. From that meeting the workers will go out to tie up any loose ends of details snd to sell script for the carnival to all and sundry. "It may sound funny for the traveling men's association to be looking for commented C. P. Christian, committee chair- man, last night." but that's just what we're doing now. Our advance sale has been good so far, but we want to sell a lot more before the doors open tonight. We don't get a chance to stage n charity show like this very often, but when we do we want to make it a good one." Tickets for the affair are in the form of SO cent books of 10 cent script blanks. One or more books entitle B couple to entrance to the celebration and the script may be used for games, dancing, or other attractions. Additional script will be available in the build- ing. WIDEI.V SOLD The traveling men have been sell- ing the script all over West Texas for the past two weeks and a ladies committee under the chairman- ship of Mrs. Nelson DeWolf has been pushing .Uie ticket sale in Abilene. Tickets are also on sale to- day at Frank Myers. Sloan's and Shahan drug stores. Projram- arrangements already have been completed. L. B. Jackson, club president, reported last nljhl. The Anson Cowtoy's Christmas Ball dancers are to highlight the cele- bration Saturday night and Ihrce floor shows are planned tonight in addition to both square and modern dancing. Two new members have been added to the east, Jackson sMd. Pop Brown Is lo be official barker and Harry Horton, professional black face comedian and impersonator. has been engaged for both Friday Pf. 16. Col. 6 carried off his feet trying to escape a creek flood that rose four feet deep in his home In 15 minutes. The floods in the Havre territory followed cloudbursts last night and continued hard rains today. Butte and Livingston In southern Mon- tana also were hit by heavy rains. O'Doniel Raps Poll Tax Low Havre. Homes and buildings In thc i coulee were} curled from eight to pany miles by'thp-fsudden flood thai Bomb Explodes Prematurely As Crew Carries It Tragedy Occurs As Men Prepare To 'Shoot' Well HOBBS, N. M., June 23 _ men. including a prominent New Mexico financ- ier, were killed and five seri- ously injured today in tht premature explosion of a nitro- glycerine time bomb with which a drilling crew was pre- paring to "shoot" an oil well near here. The list of dead, so badly seared and mangled that identification it first was difficult: Georre A. Kucmin, about president of Ihc Albuquerque, N. M.. National Trust and Sat- Ings bank and of the Albu- querque anij Cerrilloc Coal eom- panj, with mine, at Madrid, N'. M. H. A. Greer, tauier for the shooting cnw. J. T. Broluhton, a derrickman. Forrest Huston, rffman. Chirles Wrljley, rijman. Aler Blair, thMtert helper. V. B. Fetk, ihooter. All of the dead except Kaseman were residents of Hobbs and vicin- ity. The Injured: Fred Luthey, Albuquerque, N. M., vice president of the Albuquerque National Trust and Savings bank; eye lost, ether serious injuries. Herman Crile, Roswell, N, M., at- torney. Jack Startey, Hobbs, superintend- ent of the Two-State Drilling com- Windsor Spends Quiet Birthday ANT1BBS, Prance, June The Duke of Windsor spent his 44th birthday quietly today In his new Hlvlera home. lemaining within the grounds throughout the day. LONDON, June A plea for the return to Britain of the Duke ana Duchess of Windsor was voiced tonight at a dinner of the "Society of the Octavians." which met to celebrate the 44th birthday of the former king. The society, sworn to uphold the honor of the former monarch, was formed by Windsor's admirers short- ly after his abdication Dec. 12. 1935. to defend him "from all slanderous attacks" and obtain fuller recogni- tion for his past services to the country. J. B. Headley, ent geologist. Ole Attendants at lhe riiiilhj say Immediately, Uie extent' that all were seri- ous. The operation 'room was made ready for expected, amputations.. Associates said that Kaieman was financially Interested in the well, In the rich Monument district south west of here, and had come here, with Luthey, Headley and Crile to inspect it. J. D. Hodges, watchman at the well, said he was sitting In an auto- mobile about 25 feet from the crew when the nltro time bomb was be- ing taken to the well. "They appeared to be tinker- Inf with It in the back or the he 
                            

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