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Abilene Reporter News: Tuesday, June 7, 1938 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - June 7, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               WESTJEXJtf Stnlene Reporter VOL. LVIII, NO. 10. "WITHOUT. OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR E SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT __________ABILENE, TEXAS. TUESDAY MORNING, JUNE 7J938. -TEN PAGES. Unltfd IV tM IDT) PRICE 5 CENTS Southern Senators Band In Wage-Hour Filibuster Border After Planes Invade Cows Like Cats: Stand Promises To Block Early, Adjournment Curiosity Causes Deaths 01 Three BAIBD, June 6 Curiosity killed a the >ld of grasshopper poison it killed three cows today. Joe Alexander, local dairy- man, milked his cows this morning and turned them out of the lot to graze, A neighbor drove up in a wagon and went Into Alexander's house to visit. Curiosity got the best of three of the cows. They decid- ed to Investigate the wagon. They found It full of succulent with grasshopper poison. Three dead cows greeted the two men's eyes when they came out of the house. They were valued at each. OnHambyWell Avoca's Southwest Outpost Cores In Lime Without Show Tubing is scheduled today for the L. R. Terry et al No. 1 J. O. Bart- lett, extreme southeastern Jones county wildcat oil test which prov- ed opener for a new oil pool last weekend. The lest was swabbed four times yesterday Ibrough eight-inch casing and put approximately 45 barrels of oil Into 100-barrel storage tanks. During Sunday, the well swabbed 65 barrels of oil in four and a half hours, and was shut in. As soon as it Is tubed, Ihe pool discovery1 will be placed on railroad commission potential gauge. It Is producing from sand believ- ed to be either the TarmehiU or the Bluff Creek section. Location Is only JM-feet west of the Shackel- ford county line, but in Jones coun- ty, at the comer of that and Tay- lor, Callahan and Shackelford counties. The well, about 12 miles northeast of Abilene near the Hamby community, Is producing from a shallower horizon than any of the other smaller producers found northeast of here. Location is 150 feet out of the southeast corner of section 59-14- survey. In the Avoca field of northeastern Jones county. Iron Mountain Oil company cored streaks of lime and shale past feet Monday after a top of the Palo Pinto at 3.264 feet, but was showing no oil In Us No. 2 C. J. Patterson, quarter mile southwest outpost In section 195- BBBi-C survey. Three In Attorney Race At Deadline Deadline for filing of candidates lor district nnd state offices in the July 23 democratic primary passed last night with three candidates on (he ticket for 104th district attor- ney and one for 42d district attor- ney. Asking the 104th district job are Otis Mlllci of Anson, Incumbent, Howard Davlson of Rot an and J. C, Sivtpman of Abilene. J R. Black, for reelection, is the only candidate for: 42d district atcorneyshlp. Pecos Man Drowns As Boat Capsizes PECOS, June ward- ...v.. ens nnd volunteers searched vainly ln lne suil H- Posc.v against with grapple hooks and drag lines w- for damages. The today for the body of Albert Alex- from a tnick wreck. today for the body of Albert Alex ander of Pecos who drowned yestcr day In Red Bluff lake, 40 miles north of here. Mrs. Alexander and their I0-ycar- old daughter saw the man go after his fishing boat capsized. Bishop Succumbs blshrp of Veracruz and one of Mex- ico's moU widely-known church- men, died loday at the of 60. Dissension Arises Over Compromise Offer By Thomas WASHINGTON, June A tacit warning by a group of South- ern senators that they would fill- buster against a new wage-hour proposal tonight worried congres- sional leaders who had hoped to dispose of the complex question quickly and adjourn by Saturday. It appeared doubtful whether their hopes would materialize. HOLIf OWN CAUCUS Before the southerners spoke, the wage-hounproposal, which was of- fered as a compromise, has appear- ed likely to break the deadlock be- tween senate and house providing for a seven-year delay before im- posing a flat 40-cent minimum wage the country over. The sug- gestion has attracted wide support. Chairman Thomas (D-Utah) o! the senate labor committee brought It out as a composite of suggestions that had been made. But the Southerners, realizing themselves outvoted in the cmter- ence committee, held a caucus of their own. They were inclined to favor those portions of thj Thomas scheme which provided for a 25- cent wage the first year.' 21 1-2 cents the- second and scales fixed upon the recommendation of indus- trial boards the next five years. But objection was raised by cer- tain of the Southerners to the pro- vision for a country-wide scale of 40 cents after the seventh year. Quick- ly, they made It plain the price of such an arrangement would be a long delay in ending the session. The report of the conference committee must go to both senate and house for debate and approval. RIGIDITY VS.-" ELASTICITY "There will be full discussion In Senator Eilender (D- La) remarked ominously. The conference by Southern sena- tors was attended by senators El- lender ID-LH) and Pepper members of the conference commit- tee, and senators Andrews Bankhead Conntilly (D- Overtoil (D-La) Byrnes (D- Smith (D-SO, and Russell One of the important issues be- fore the senate-house conferees Is rigidity vs. elasticity. As passed by the senate, the wage-hour bill pro- posed a 40-cent minimum wage to be administered by a board empow- ered to grant exemptions, while the house measure called for rigid im- position of minima advancing from 25 cents an hour the first year to 10 cents after the third. By flatly applying wage minima the first two years, and then per- mitting exceptions to the next five years, sought to win sup- port from supporters of rigidity and Elasticity. FLEES AUSTRIA 104th Docket To Be Called Today Docket will be called this morn- ing for the seven-weeks summer term of IWth district court in Abi- lene. The term was opened Monday when Judge W. R. Chapman im- panelled A grand jury and started trial of a civil suit. District At- torney Otis Miller indicated that the grand jury probably will make a report Tuesday afternoon. Testimony was finished late Mon- Another Jury case Is docketed Tues- day, a third Wednesday and fourth Friday. Foul Scores Run PUEBLO, Colo., June 6- wi Ihe spectators at a ball game at St. Mary's athletic field. It was Just another foul it was stored run ccnlral fire The foul ire alarm box. and the jar set off will dirrct the vespers the alarm. The lire department made the home run. SEASON'S TOTAL Girl, 7, And Boy, 14, Being Treated Ai Baird Hospital For Rattlesnake Bites BAIRD. June Callahan county youngsters were in GriTs hospital here tonight suffering from rattlesnake biles. Meiba Jeen Tyson, 7-year-old daughter ol Mr. and Mrs. Buford Tyson of Baird, was in more seri- ous condition, but attendants re- ported she would recover. She was bitten late yesterday by a huge rat- llernalce as she was walking in the rear of the family home. She Is a granddaughter of Mrs. Will Rylle, district clerk. CloVls McDonald. H, son of Mr. sml Mrs. Jerry McDonald ot the Bayou communfty, was brousht to the hospital laic this afternoon after having been bitten on the low- er part of a leg by a larje snake. He was bitten whilc helping shock grain in his father's field SIG9IUND FREUD LONDON. June His fortune gone and his health fragile, 82-year-old Dr. Sig- mund Freud began z new life in England today. Left behind, perhaps forever, was the scientist's beloved Vi- enna, now transformed by the nazls. In England he will seek the cniiet and peace he knew in Austria before Germany annex- ed the country March 13. He was the first prominent Jew allowed to leave there since the creation of the Great- er Germany. "Everything we owned has teen taken away, but we don't feel his daughter, Anna, said cheerily. Church Youth Holds Banquet Event Prelude To Annual Gathering; 'Rails Man Speaks Approximately 300 young people primed their appetites at a banquet on the college campus last night in preparation for the annual assembly of Northwest Tex- as Methodist youth. Served outdoors on the lawn al President hall, the banquet was made even more pleasant by a re- freshing breeze. Guests were greet- ed to the assembly in the name of McMiirry college by its president, Dr. T. Brabham. Doan Marvin Boyd or Rule responded. Toastmaster Aisle Carleton, Trent Methodist pastor, introduced the Rev. j. Edmund Kirby of Rails, who delivered the keynote address. Tak- ing ttie assembly theme, "Bo Ye Steadfast." as his topic, he counsel- ed his listeners that "God has a plan for each one ot you. To ful- fill it. we must be steadfast. And in order to be steadfast, we must hav faith in God." he declared. "To be steadfast." Rev. Kirby continued, "we must surrender our- selves to God's leadership and pur- pose, or how else can God have hts Bringing hi.s address to a force fill close. Kirby asserted that our political, social and economic problems would reach a solullon "when men become what God wants them to be.'' CLASSES TO BEGIN Class sessions will gel underway at 3 o'clock today, in eleven courses. Conducting the classes will be Ihe Rev. v. O'Kellcs' of Aiken, the Rev, J. o. Haymes, presiding elder home of the bride's parents. of the Amarillo districl; the Rev. P. E. Yarbrotigh. Dumas; the Rev. E L. Yeats. Crowell; Mrs. Jim Farwell, Amarillo; the .Rev. E. A. Irvine, Margaret; the Rev. Uel D. Crosby, Roscoc; W. E. Hamilton. Lubbock, and the Rev. T. S. Barcus, Claren- don presiding elder. A morning watch will be held daily at a.m., and evening ves- pers at pm. In charge of the ton' Sue Howell of Friday nights. Tiic.platform speak- er will b? the Ucv. Pints A. Crutch- field. Vernon. The awemblv close Friday night with presentation of work cert locales. FIRST 1'ASTORS' CI.1N1C A pastors' clinic will be held In Clovts Balrd by o'clock until noon, beginning today 7 ,n. OCK beginning today will taKe charge and Install the radio I !oland continuing through Friday. On roulpment. William Gottlieb, depart- I i wln te Rev- nienl ot "mmcrcc representative In t aid was anmints- s H vnmut ___ -u.- .1.. i. passing by. First aid was adminis- tered in the form of coal oil treat- ment. The youngsters were the second and third victims of rattlesnakes S. H. Young, presiding older of the Siveclwatcr district; the Rev R O Bnwder. of Caps, nnd the Rev. W. C. House. Big Spring. The clinic will be held in a ban- county Daladier Tours Anti-Aircraft Guns Speed War Planes Back Over Spain PERPIGNAN, Prance, June Edouard Daladier, France's "strong man" premier, today toured the frontier In nn effort to put French antiaircraft defenses on war footing Aroused by three aerial incursions from Spain within 12 days, the pre- ALICANTE, Spain, Junj (AP) Insurgent air raiders swept down the Mediterranean coast today kivinj at least M dead and 300 Injured in a bomb- pork rd (rail trom'L'ttttllon la io Alicante. Result of (he iwllt aerial lacks wzs: dead, many injured. 1Z dead, 38 injured. Small coastal Til- dead, approximately 100 injured. mier, who also holds the portfolios o.' war and national defense, flew fiom Paris. SHU'S FLEE UNSCATHED Arriving at Toulouse, he left by automobile for the mountainous bor- derland four and-a half hours after i squadron ol planes from Spain circled over France's Cerdagne val- ley In the Central Pyrenees. Warning shots from Franch anti- circraft batteries caused the nine planes to wheel about. As they crossed the border, Span- ish government anti-aircraft bat- teries at Puigcerda fired more than IW shots at them, without scoring a Jilt but Indicating government (loops believed them enemy craft. France's anti-aircraft defenses al- icady had been tightened to prevent repetition of a 50-mile Invasion yes- terday by nine planes of "unknown nationality" which dropped bombs near Alx-Les-Thermes, 15 miles within the border. The Sunday bombardment marked >f. deepest inroad by alien Ilght- Ir.g planes since the Spanish civil war started July 18, 1936. There fere no casualties yesterday and no bombs were dropped, today. .Insurgents Deny Their- Sh ips I rir Ai i' BURGOS, Spain, June Insurgent Generalissimo Francisco Franco's general staff Issued a statement tooday that no Insurgent planes had been in the air near the French frontier. Rebels Surround Loyalist Center HENDAYE, France (At the Span- ish Frontier) June in- surgents reported tonight their forces had encircled Albocacer, cen- ter of government resistance block- ing the southward drive toward Castcllon de la Plana and Valencia. Dispatches from Ihe front said capture of Ihe town was "only a matter of time." Gagsters'll Like This WPA Yarn PHOENIX, Ariz., June Police were asked today by a wor- ried citizen to_ Investigate a suspici- ous character 'who had been sitting on the curb all morning. A radio, car rushed to the scene. On th'lr return the squad made this written, report: "Man is O. K., working for WPA." Joan Skelly Weds TULSA, Okla, June E-kelly, daughter of W O Skelly president ol the Skelly Oil com- pany, and Mrs. Sicily, was married to Harold Cutliff Stuart, son of M and Mrs. Royal C. Stuart ot Okla homa City, late this afternoon Radio Towers And Building Approved Equipment To Be Installed Soon WITH GILLETTE IN LEAD- Wearin Trailing In Iowa This picture, mode some time ago, of Otha Wearin (left) and James Roosevelt, son of the president, at a political rally at Harpers Ferry, Va., became hot campaign material in Iowa, al- ter Wearin. seeking the demo- cratic senatorial nomination against the Incumbent, Guy Gillette, had apparently won White House approval of Jils campaign In a reference by James Roosevelt to "My friend Olha Wearin." The picture was being used widely by Wearin supporters. OA1S-FILLEO BARN COLLAPSES, TAKES TWO CHILDREN'S LIVES Three Others Hurt When Structure Caves As Effort Made To Plug Hole FORT WORTH, June children were killed three persons Injured tonight when the roof of a barn filled with 1 500 bushels ol oats collapsed on the B. F. Warren farm, 10 miles west of Fort Worth. The dead; David Let Clifton, 4, ion ol Die Clifton, neljhbor farmer. Belly Jo Kennedy, 1J, daughter ol Mr. Mrt. Hanson Ken- nedy, neighbors. The injured were Mrs. Charles Head, 32, daughter of the Warrens, sustained.a severe-head injury. Ike Clifton, 23, father of the dead coy, whose head also was. injured. May granddiugh- (fi of the Warrens. Willie Palmer, a farm hand who worked for the Warren family, said the oats had been spilling from the roof and that he had gone to" the barn with a sack to plug the hole. The children and others iccom- psnied him, he said, and stood be- low. They were to call to him when the leak was stopped. "All of a said Palmer, "the whole roof gave way with me r.nd down I went." Palmer fought himself clear of the I'.uge pile of grain and timber and began shouting for help. Alarmed neighbors came to the rescue and with shovels began at- tr.cklng the huge pile of grain. Their quick work probably saved the Dillon child smothering. from death by Another lad, Johnny Warren Jr., escaped the debris. North Pork School Asks WPA Building Proposal for a Works Progress administration project for construc- tion of a new North Park school building has been cleared through the Abilene area office, B. C. Rog- ers, engineer, said Monday. The district recenlly voted J9.000 in bonds to finance its share of the costs. Proposed is construction of nine-room brick building with com- bination auditorium-gymnasium, all of which would be one-story high. The old. two-story building would be demolished, and the hill on which it Is standing would be level- led off. Plans were drawn by Gasklll-Mc- Danlel, architccls. Official approval of the facility building ano five towers of the ra- tflc beam station north of the mu- r.lclpal airport was given Saturday Interest groups and folk will occupy the r...... A special union and missionary Robert Alpher, construction engl- program Is slated tonight at the au- 'nf federal bureau of aerial dftorinm, with platform addresses set for Wednesday. Thursday and World War Shell Explodes, Kills One OAKLAND, Calif., June (UP) A three-Inch shrapnel shell, relic ol the World war. exploded in a back- yard bonfire Sunday and killed Noel L. Webb. 25. The explosion blew down a shed and Mattered shrapnel a block F.way. Date Thursday A meeting of wheat growers for discussion of the wheat Insurance program will be held Thursday af- ternoon o'clock In the county courtroom. Tlie meeting was previously an- nounced through the Reporter-News for Tuesday. County Agent Knox Parr will explain the wheat Insur- ance program, wnereby crops for 1933 and ensuing pears may be in- sured of a 75 per cent normal yield. Parr said that other matters re- garding the wheat crop would also be discussed, including possibilities of obtaining loans the govern- ment. are likely to come, sooner or he said. "When they do, farmers will have to find their own places for storing their grain, which will mean using of elevators and warehouses. "Operators of these warehouses will not store grain that Is green and In danger of Parr added. In urging farmers not to cut wheat before it Is fully ripened. Ranking Student Of Pharmacy Dies NEW YORK. June Island university's greatest phar- macy student wr.s buried today, four days after he wai graduated and fi month alter he predicted his own' death. He was Charles Bertram Lucks. 21. A month ago be took a count of his blood under his microscope and (Ilicorered he had acute myoplastic kukemla, B virtually Incurable con- tillon. Last Wednesday, at the college commencement eserclses. he receiv- his bachelor }f science degree and the H. B. Smith memorial prize i.i S1DO for the highest grades of anv student la the history of the On Friday Lucks suddenly col- lapsed Ir. it coma. He died Saturday. Election Viewed As Power Test For Outsiders Green's Telegram Advises Laborer To Back Gillette DES MOINES, la., June Rep. Otha D. Wearin, who claimed presidential support In his quest ol the Iowa democratic senatorial nomination, trailed Sen. Guy M. Gillette by three-to-two margin tonight as returns mounted from the state's 2.417 precincts. Former Sen L. J. Dickinson at- tempting a comeback after his de- feat two years ago, was adding to his lead over Rep. Lloyd Thurs- ton for thf republican senatorial nomination. MAJORITY FOB GILLETTK Returns from 261 of the 2.447 pre- cincts gave Gillette as many votes as all four of hte opponents com- bined. The count was: Byerhoff 579. Gillette Meyers Richardson 856. Wearin Gillette sought renomination for the senate on a platform of loyal- ty to President Roosevelt but said he would retain the right to judge each New Deal proposal on its in- dividual merits if he Is reflected. He was one of the foes of the presi- dent's courl reform plan but sup- ported the. reorganization bill and other administration measures. From the larger national stand- point the Iowa electorate ruled on the political effectiveness of James Roosevelt son and secretary of the Hopkins and Thomas Corcoran. New Deal strategist. GREEN TAKES PAR'T Wearin, who campaigned on the claim that.the national admlnislra- liori his candidacy, had, the" tacit" 'support' 6f Jimes Hoosevelt and the outright endorse- ment ol Hopkins. All the outside" participation, was not limited to assis- tance for Wearin. William Green, president of the American Federa- tion of Labor, contributed a last- minute telegram advising the work- ing man to support Gillette. Sena- tors Wheeler and Borah and other colleagues of Gillette in the upper house raised a. furious storm in Washington after Hopkins an- nounced he would "have voted for Wearin "II I lived, in Iowa." Senatorial criticism of "playing politics with relief" caused observers to watch closely today for specific election trends attributable to (he 33.500 WPA workers on the rolls In this state. The Hopkins endorsement also had its repercussions in Iowa. Gov. Nelson G. Kraschel wired the WPA official his "resentment" at the lat- ter's "interference" In the Iowa race. Iowa Treasurer Leo J. Weg- man, however, a Wearin campaign aide, followed Kraschel's statement with a telegram of commendation to Hopkins for his Wearin stand. Ihe Weather Anir.KNt: and ylrlnlly: Tarll) rlondy WEST TEXAS: r.rtly cloudy In soolli. and In north por- llon today: Wrdnrsdar parljj rtondr, KAST TEXAS: PatHr cloudy, thar.drr- snonrri and coolrr In noclhirrtt pntllon Icdar: cloQrly, local Ihondfr- In north portion, footer In norlh- rail And aoalhra't NKVV .MEXICO: 1'nirltlrd tod.r: thnn- rr rast ponton: paitly cloudy, Marmrr portion. OKLAHOMA! Ixrol Ihunjtnrioorrs. cooVr today: Wrrinoday (rurally Kanir ot Irmprratnrr AH IIOIR rjt 10 M l lfcttfjl and lonrM m. a S9 99 B! commerce. Completed recently, the building U of pressed brick and glass brick and will house Instruments and gen- erator (or radio beam broadcast- Ing. Four of the 130-foot steel tow- ers will be used in broadcasting the ciam and the other for regular rcrlal conversation. Joe Scbacher and company of IN PSYCHIATRIC SEXUAL UNBALANCE LAID TO. CRANIAL GLAND connection with Ihe assembly for Kansas contracted building for the first time this year. Sessions tiLtSO. will be held at the First Methodist Within a few days an engineer church each morning Irom 10 from the Wcsttnghousc Electric Co. will take charge and Install the radio j Abilene, said last night The installation will require aboul SIN wcclts, hr Mid. About Ihree weeks of testing will follow before the sU- is ofllclallv on Ihe Mr. r than in years, jop Ivan Lcc'lioli I ion from (he airport. By HOWARD W. Bl.AKESl.EE AssofUlcd Press Science Editor SAN FRANCISCO. June covery of the reason why many per- sons, estimated at three per cent of thr total populallon, are too great- ly attracted by the same sex. was n-porlcd io Ihe American Psychiatric association here today. It Is dur to the pituitary gland, at Ihf base of Ihe brain, getting out of cider In regulating the amount of icx harmoncs produced. Normally flits glan.1 causes production of a ivcpondcrancc of malf hormones In a man and female hormones Jn women. But both sexes always have a small lA-rccntagc o! these chemical regu- lators of the opposite sex. In case of the three per cent of Ihe popula- tion. Ihe pituitary gland gels the h.irmonc mixture scrambled. It fives a man. for example, a prepon- derance of feminine hormones. Scientific evidence that this upset cautes a person to be attracted by the same sex was reported by Clif- ford A. Wright of Los Angeles. In some of Ihe cases. Dr. Writrht said, progress had been made to- v ard correcting Ihe affliction by use r! one of the hormones normally reduced by the pituitary gland. Correc'lng this affliction. Dr. Wright said, is important In pre- untlon of sex crimes He pointed out that although major sex crimes r.ie not usually committed by the persons with hormone trouble, it is one factor In the legal situa- tion. A change in lentercing criminals advocated by Fiank M. Ogden. J dge of the superior court st Oak- 'and. Calif. "1 am satisfied." he said, "that me solution will not be found until vc recognize the chemical as a hu- man being until the aid of medical science we examine him pnor to Imposing sentence so his case may be correctly diagnosed, r-nd then prescribe a sentence that Is not merely punishment, but also Intelligent treatment to check and possibly cure his type of anti-social disease." M. F. BRAXTON Cash Kidnaping Search Drags Agents Release Only Two Men Held As Suspects PRINCETON, Fla., June The Cash family returned to busi- ness today and this hamlet slipped into routine ways amid fading hopes for an early solution of the Jimmy Cash kidnaping. Federal agents released the only two men they were known to be holding while 'a handful of men conlinued 'a last-chance search of Islands south of here. James Bailey Cash .Sr. reopened his filling statjon...and -iijnchropm 'jiis H'fi- year-old only child was abducted a week ago Saturday. The men released .were M.-F. Braxton, unemployed Princeton carpenter, and his son, James, A" Cape Sable commercial flshermwi. The men returned home shortly after their wives made a tearful appeal for Ihelr release. They did not discuss Ihe investigation. The usual "no comment" met all inquiries as (o whether any of the In ransom bills had been turned In. J. Edgar Hoover. FBI director, was reported to have visited the spot where the ransom was paid before coming here. Searchers were sent to Button- wood Key, an Island south of here, upon receipt of a report a navy plane had sighted a. boat among the mangrove bushes. Hogue Warns 'Reds' To Sail For Russia JERSEY CITY, N. J., June Frank Hague looked over a vast crush of humanity in a forest of American flags in Journal square tonight and shouted above a din of cheering "Ihe Reds had bet- ter get the first ship nack to Hus- sia." The mayor marched at the head of paraders into the plaza where several of his opponents have tailed in efforts to deliver speeches. "Let me say this to communists and Hague told the throng estimated.by Col. Hugh A. Kelly, secretary to Gov, A. Hurry Moore, at 175.000. "this demonstration is an Indication of how the working- men in Jersey City feel on the sub- ject." McCraw, Lone Star Row Over Levies Freezing Of State Funds Threatened RICHMOND, June Lone Star Gas company is attempting to drstroy the entire gas rate structure of Teras, Attorney General William McCraw declared Monday as Lone Star attorneys threatened to tie up the state tax funds nor- nally available lor this work. With all funds due to be ex- hausted June 15, the state faces complete of its attempts to tgulMe the price of gas to retail distributing agencies. McCraw said n a campaign speech, here. At a conference ir. Austin Mon- Star counsel slid the company n'oiild continue to pay Its jross income tax only "under pro- test." As an alternative, the com- pany offered. McCraw said, to with- draw Its orotest if the gas utilities would agree not to spend any jf the money In aiding dlies and :uwns in gas rate :ontroversies. McCraw said this ronstllutcd tin cller by Lone Star to pay its taxes cnly in the event it covild be per- muted to say hon and to what ex- tent It could be regulated.   

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