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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: June 2, 1938 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - June 2, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               WEST TEXAS' Abilene Reporter- "WITHOUT, OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES, .WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS fT VOL. LVIH, NO. 6. AM4dilc< PrtM (AP( ABILENE, TEXAS. THURSDAY MORNING, JUNE 2, PAGES 5 CENTS May's Building, Postal Records Reflect Gains Farm And Ranch Outlook Is Bright And Dark Abilene continued to hold its rep- utation In May us a bright spot on 'ie business map. Month-end re- HForts show Increases in business on every hand over reports for the same time last year. Building permits forged 'to the front as 33 permits for the. month totaled more than above May, 1531. Alteration penults showed a total of and per- mits for repairs was S185. Erection of new residences and business houses valued at Five-month total of permits for the year was as compared With for 1937. Postal receipts for May showed a gain of over the same month last year, accrding to figures released .yesterday by Postmaster O A. Hale Last month's sum was while for May, 1937, re- ceipts were Gain for the first five months o! the year figured over the same period for last year. PLUS rON MONEY ORBEHS Money order business at the office was good as usual- Orders isrtfed were 4197 for as compared to 6699 money orders pai< off for The difference was a balance of to be spent in Abilene. Outlook in the agricultural ant livestock business in the Abilene territory show both a bright and a dark side with the pendulum likely to swing either way. Every section of the country has experienced abundant rainfall, raising the monthly average above normal and above that of last year. Crops are up and growing, small grain is in good shape and large acreages have been planted every- where. Cattle have held extremely wiU as to price with a top pries of nine and one-half cents for steers on the Fort Worth markets. Stockmen have taken advantage of the price during May, sending a large majori- ty of their cattle to market- Good grass and water kept the animals in top shape and weighing was heavy. AtJy was the Wg month for ranchers, most of contracting for deliveries. GRAIN' PRICES LOW On the other side of the picture wheat Is bringing 50 to 55 cents a bushel and oats about 16 cents, only about one-half the price paid for Ihe products a year ago. Row crops pre being dangerously threatened by a plague of grasshoppers with farmers banding- together for a concentrated fight against the pests. A blot on the livestock horizon is the sheep and goat situation. Wool Is only 16 to 20 cents a pound as compared to 32 to 35 cents a pound ii year ago. All markets are glutted with shorn yearling lambs selling for four to six cents a pound. Lasi year they sold for seven to ten cents a pound. Produce men in Abilene report that dairy products are selling for the lowest since the early part of 1935. WEDS M'CORMICK Adah Wilson, above, nurse for the late JeanHarlow, Is shown in her Los Angeles apartment as she told of her coming marriage to Harold F. McCormick. PASADENA, June Fowler McCor- mick, 66-year-old harvester mil- lionaire, and his comely 34- year-old bride began a quiet honeymoon today in the heavily- guarded estate of McCormick's sister where they were married last night. Gardners and private detec- tives watched the gales and high iron picket fence of the estate when McCormick took Adah Wilson of Los Angeles, his for- mer nurse, as his third wife. AS FDR ASKS FREE HAND- Insurgents Drive Deeper In South HENDAYE, France, at the Span- ish Frontier, June Spanish insurgents' swift-moving drive from Terucl south toward the Mediterranean today rolled govern- ment defenders tr.ck to within about 32 miles of Valencia province. Generalissimo Francisco Franco's troops struck deepest to the south near Rincon de Ademuz. a small territory on the martitime province's western border. Cotton Stages Rally NEW YORK. June The cotton market sriappe'rl out of a long decline today with n late rise of arvmd SI a bale on the New Yor kcotton exchange. Traders at- tributed the rally lo short covering r.ud cessation of a selling movement which tad knocked prices abc.ut n bale last week. down China Protests GEN'EVA. June protested to Ihe League of Nations today asking "urgent and effective measures" to maSe Japan "cease the wholesale slaughter of human bcingr." In aerial bombardments such as the recent attacks on Can- ton. Colleges Ready For Summer City Institutions All Begin Terms Within Next Week Abllene's three colleges this week are making optimistic preparation for their summer terms. Hardin-Simmons university will be the first to start vacation per- iod work, with registration slated today. Classes will begin meeting Friday. COLIJXS Registration" at 'Abilene Chris- tian college is scheduled June 1, with classes starting the following day. college will begin its first term June 10. At Hardin-Simmons, 112 courses are being offered in 11 departments during the two six-weeks term. The first term will end July 12. while the second will run from July 12 to August 20.- Dr. R. A. Collins, dean of stu- dents and head of the education department, will be director of the summer session. He will be assisted by 25 regular and guest faculty members. Extra-curricular activities will in- clude tennis and other sports, and daily swimming for all students in the school pool. PLAN CARLSBAD TRIP Dr. G. C. Morlan will direct the McM Confers Degrees loday On 58 Seniors Term-End Events Bring Crowd Of To Campus Climaxing a two day program of entertainment and celebration for seniors ana alumni and exes of IvfcMurry college, 58 seniors will be awarded degrees this morning at the annual spring commencement exercises of the college. Opening with the convocation procession end a song, the program will continue with the Invocation by the Rev. Young, presid- ing elder of the Sweetwater Meth- odist district. Tommy Greer, senior, vrill play a violin solo. The Rev. W. H. Mansfield, pas- tor of the Trinity Methodist church nt El Paso, will deliver the com- mencement address. Following the -rtdress, honor awards to the seniors will be made and President Thomas W. Brabham will present bachelor degrees to the graduates. The entire student body will sing the alma mater song and the Rev. Rev. Cal C. Wright, presiding elder of the Verr.on district, will give the benediction. ALUMNI BREAKFAST This morning at o'clock an- nual election of officers of the alum- ni and ex-students association will te the principal order of business at the alumni breakfast at the Wooten hotel. At that time grad- uates of '38 will be admitted to the association. Presiding for the breakfast will be Anthony Hunt, president of the alumni body. He is superintendent of schools.at Kellerville and son of McMurry's founder and first presi- dent, Dr. James Wfnford Hunt. Last night approximately visitors, parents and students gath- ered on the east terrace of the col- lege campus to view the ''annual pre- sentation of fine arts depart- ment; "The. Bartered an opera. Yesterday many prospective col- lege freshmen visited the campus in the first annual high school sen- iors day and In the afternoon a taby show of children of alumni was held. Reunions of several classes were held yesterday afternoon and last night. HUGE AIRLINER MAKES DEBUT; READY SOON FOR TEST FLIGHT Senate Splits Over Relief Spending )ebate Flares )n Earmarking Specific Funds Senator Connolly Gains Farmers Clearer Status WASHINGTOK, June rhe senate split into diametrically opposed factions today after Presi- ent Roosevelt urgently requested eglslators to pass the pending-lending bill without at- achlng -strings which would pie- ent "the selection of those pro- ects which can be got under way most speedily." Administration supporter: said he president's letter asscXfng the unemployment situation has grown was an argument against HSU Board Studies Routine Matters Only routine matters occupied the attention of Hardin-Simmons trustees at their annual June meet- ing yesterday afternoon, board members reported. The session was thinly attended, out-of-town directors having un- derstood that no questions of major ACC summer session, which olfers Importance would be considered. a faculty of 29 members In college and six in demonstration school. Approximately 100 courses of study are being offered. First ACC term will end July 19, with the second closing August 26. Featured In the curriculum will be courses in elementary education and visual education. New equipment has been bought for audio-visual demonstrations. Guest teachers in education will include Betty Mercey of the Fort Worth public schools, and Lena B. Meeker of the Temple schools. Recreational activities will include a trip to Carlsbad caverns near the See COLLEGES, fg. 3, Col. S. Texans Seek Lab, Air Mail Routing WASHINGTON, June Texans seeking the proposed fed- eral research laboratory today sub- mitted to Secretary Wallace of the Department of Agriculture an out- line of advantages to te gained by its location in that state. Representative Kietierg Burrls C. Jackson of Hillsboro. pres- ident of Iht Texas Cotton associa- tion, and Elmore T. Torn, Long- view, headed the delegation. Other groups a proposed air mail route .from San Antonio to Amarillo via San Angelo and Lub- and flood control and recla- mation programs for the upper Colorado river, in West Texas. Several members living elsewhere, however, had visited the school Sunday for the baccalaureate ser- Injuries Fatal LUBBOCK, June H. (Bill) Mitchell, 31, resident of Dal- las until moving to Lubbock about two months ago, died In a sani- tarium tonight of injuries suffered in en automobile accident near hert Saturday night. Ihe Weather AlMl.F.XE GrnrrAlly today. MF.ST TKXAS: Gfmrally lair In ranhAndTr lodar; Friday   money from leaving tlir country, except for absolute necessities that Japan lacks. regarded as destructive as black stem nisi, has been found in Okla- homa. Kansas and Missouri. Moisture in Kansas was described as plentiful to excessive for wheat. Bankers' President Hits Central Relief SALT LAKE CITY. June sound fiscal policy in govern- ment "can never be achieved until a major part of the relief load Is turned b.ick to local communities, (he president of Ihe American i association declared lo- nicht. In a siieech prepared for delivery 'before the final session of the Mountain States Accounting con- ference. Orval W. Lake said: Adams, Salt "It is unthinkable that the re- lift program should continue to be Export control likewise applies to administered out of Washington money. Foreign firms have large j Providing lor the worthy needy is sums "frozen" In Japanese batiks! a legitimate function of tccal and -money earned In Japan lint whose str.'e government, and should never remission to home offices Is forbid- i have been centralized at I Washing ton.1' political elusive labor contracts. Mexico not entirely wilhou phone service since there are tw systems. Stolen Hat Sends Indian On Warpoth GRAND CANYON, June Jim Gwetva, aged sub- chief of the Supal Indians, Is on the warpath because some- one stole the dilapidated slllc top hat given him 25 years ago by President Theodore Roost- velt. When President Roosevelt visited the canyon. Big Jim, acting as a one-man welcoming committee, came from the gor- ge's door, where ills tribe lives, to greet the "great white fath- er." The president was Intrigued with Big Jrni, and the Indian was Impressed with Roosevelt's hat and swallow tailed coat. Before departing, the presi- dent presented the hat and coat (o Big Jim. They became his prise possessions, always to be worn on important occasions. In preparation for a visit to the south rim Milage. Brg Jim transferred the hat and coat to his shack near here. The hat was stolen. THE DAY IN WASHINGTON Kj the Asuplatod nut President Roosevelt asked congress to pass the 000 spendlng-lendlng bill with- out restrictions on administra- tion of the fund. Secretary Hull. Iri a Etrongly worded note, told Japan that she was violating American rights In China by refusing to return American properties In former war zones to their own- ers. Chairman Pittman (D-Nev) of the senate foreign relations committee predicted that "real objection" to the proposed St. Lawrence waterway treaty would come from Canada. The house approved a bill In- tended to mcxlernize and ex- pand a food anu drug law en-. acted 32 year: ago. 3. Monroe Johnson, assistant of .commerce, said President Roosevelt has asked; an '-.of filers- iatv1 ,T tries. a movement to "ear-mark" huge slices of the funds for ipjeclflc pro- jects. They said the a'dmlnlstra- wanted a free hand to select projects. DENY POLITICS INVOLVED Senate conservatives quickly an- nounced they Interpreted the let- ter as an endorsement of earmart- Inj. They said they had a list of projects which, could be started quickly. Behind this conflict was a strug- with major political aspects. During senate debate the last few days, critics of the administration, charged political use of relief funds. Senator Wheeler (D-Mont) said relief money apparently was to be employed to defeat senators "because some one doesn't like the color of their hair." Proponents of earmarking said these charges showed that congress should keep strict control over ap- propriations. Administration men, denying" political motives, agreed that to tie the hands of the president would be to prevent the mobilization of relief dollars quickly in the areas where they were most needed. VOTE APPROPKMTION HIKE The senate worked at a slow pace through most of the day, however, voting 58 to 18 to Increase the J250.000 house-approved appropri- ation for the national resources committee to An amendment was adopted re- quiring the WPA to pay wages equal to the minimum set In any See RELIEF ROW, Tf. 3, Col 7- Mexican Officers Say Revolt Ended MEXICO CITY, June Army officers returning to the cap- ital today from the state of San Luis Potcsi said the situation there was completely peaceful. "it Is Just a Job of hunting down a few one of them said of the government's operations against remnants of the rebel force of Satumino Cedlllo, agra- rian leader who was "strong of the state. Twelve army planes which had been rushed to San Luis Potosi at outbreak of the revolt May 21 left for Mexico City today. RIGHT ON Westbound American Airlines Transport Lands, Picks Up Mail On New Schedule On schedule to the minute, a uestbound American Airlines trans- port landed nt the municipal airport c.1 o'clock yesterday afternoon in its first regularly scheduled stop loi mall and passengers. Ten passengers were aboard the plane en route to Los Angeles and points connecting. More than 238 Pf'iinds of mall were being fliwn west, seven pounds were put off here for distribution and seven pounds were taken aboard the ship, "Dutch" Schlegel, American Air- lines agent predlclfd thai In a few Tteks the number of passengers and pcunds of mail to be discharged and jut aboard the westbound plane would greatly Increase. The new scheduled slop contact with the eastbound flight due at o'clock In the afternoon, providing two-way dally service.   

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