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Abilene Reporter News: Monday, May 16, 1938 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - May 16, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               Reporter OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR P'OES, WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY 'AS IT -Byron VOL LVli, NO. 356 ABILENE, TEXAS. MONDAY EVENING, MAY 16, 1938 PAGES '.UP) PRICE 5 CENTS 'DEADLIEST' BLAZE FOR ATLANTA- WITH JUSTICE BLACK II II X I I II Fire Guts Hotel; 25 Killed; Member Drive TeXQS GaS CdSe Returned Dozen Guests Hurt, Others Are Missing Roof Of 5-Story Structure Foils To Balk Escape ATLANTA, May Twenty five persons were killed, a dozen were injured and many others were missing in a fire which raged early to- day through the five-story Ter- minal hotel. Fire Chief 0. Parker said it was "the deadliest fire in the hist-ory of Atlanta." IDENTIFICATION HAMPERED With 2-i bodies removed froni the rains, at least a score of persons were unaccounted for under varying estimates of the registration. Destruction of the hotel records and mutilation of the victims by falling timber and steel hampered identification efforts. The ruined wall stood as a men- ace to traffic and rescue -workers. Police said a high wind would cause them to crumble. Collapse of the roof, plunging debris "through charred floors to the basement, cut off hope of sur- vival for any who were trapped. Only the walls were left standing. Hotel attaches said "at least fif- ty" were registered when the flames broke out with an explosion in the basement kitchen shortly after 2 a. m. Fire Chief O. J. Parker said he was informed 60 were in the brick and frame building. Five persons jumped. One man, unidentified, who isaped from a fourth floor window, died of a" broken neck. Three other men were suffocated. Chief Parker declined to specu- late as to what the death toll would be when searchers completed a check cf the debris. A dozen hose lines still poured water -'hrougs shattered at davv-n. Ambulances were lined :up in the plaza of the Southern Hail- way station across a street- from the" hotel, waiting for the- discovery of other victims. RESCUERS INJURED Ben L-. Berry. 78-year-old hotel clerk, and G. H-. Kimberly, 54. a fireman, were burned on the hands in rescue work. Hospital attaches listed guests who were injured as: L. A. Sunn, no address, skull frac- ture. Delmous Ledbetter. 29, L-yth- See FIRE, Pg. 9, Col. 5 West Extension Struck At Avoca STAMFORD. May r o n Mountain's No. 1 C. J. Peterson this morning had created a three-fourths mile west extension to the Avoca oil field east of here. Top of lime was found at 3J201 feet anc ten feet of saturation drilled. Five-inch casing was being set preparatory to cementing. This well is running 4 to 5 feet higher structurally than any others drilled along the west edge of the field. Location is 330 feet from the north and 330 feet from the west lines, section 195. survey. What Is Your News I. a? Electrical 'Fishing Lines' Detecting Oi! Miles Deep Shown At Tulsa Exposition TCLSA, Okla.. May 16. New electrical "fishing wires miles long, that hang down oil wells and detect hidden pools of oil, were demonstrated today at the Intemaitonal Petroleum ex- Dosition. Their "bait" is a set of electrodes whose electric field spots not cnlv ordinary ixxsls but, miles down, finds oil in a new and different form. The deeper oil is apparently distilled, probably a due to vast pressure and intense heat. _ _ Their electrical "logging." as the oil men call it. is one of the important developments "in the petroleum industry. Three are shown here. Their names are the Jeep, the "Slumber Jay" and the Slec- be'- Jay" is oil French for the proper name Schlum- is the name of the first of the electrical fish lines, erge- soonsored bv a French firm with a It was the "Slumber oil men here said, whicn a weeks ago. at just 100 feet less than two ana a half miles wn in the world's deepest well, of the Continental Oil company, do Jeep The Jeep" plugs an electrode '.nto theTurface and lowers the other into the well. It electrical JSSfrS "permeability, saturation and porosity of formations encountered.'1___________________ UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS SEVERAL WOUNDED AS MEXICO STUDENTS AND POLICE CLASH MEXICO CITY. May 16 clashes in which several persons were wounded students of the University of Mexico today reoccupied uni- versity buildings which had been seized by socialists hostile to the institution. Of C-C Named City Sales Army i To Take Field j About May 26 I Jesse Winters and David G. Bar- rcw will head the city sales army ano organize that group, 125 strong, before the end of the week, an- j j nounced J. C. Hunter, general chair- man of the Forward Business cam- i paign of the Abilene chamber of j commerce. j The group will consist of four i majors, heading divisions. Sach i major, in turn, will secure four cap- tains to head teams of five lieu- tenant workers each. They will take the field on or i i about "May 26 to solicit individual i i S25 voting" memberships to add to the activities fund investments be- j ling secured by a committee under; J. Fulwiler and O. E. Badford. i MAJORS APPOINTED j Within an hour this morning. 'Winters and Barrow had named j and had acceptances of the lour di- visional majors. They are J. M. j Shelton. division 1; Russell -Steph- j ens, division 2; Homer Scott, cUvi- sion 3; and Thomas E. Brownlee, j division 4. j These majors will organize their i workers today and tomorrow. j itv sales army will have ft DISNEY CHIEF POSTS ULTIMATUM Enraged students who discovered The the seizure of the buildings short- j Quota of representing 210 roof tops. A number fell, wound- led. The students desisted after Rec- itor Chico Georne counselled calm, From the industrial activities, the sreat majority of the leaders, at last week's breakfast, suggested: (1) Study to make Abilene the MEXICO CITY. May asserting hunger would compel the capital of West Texas oil industry- Several persons were wounded to- j ir-vaders to yield. day in a clash between students and j The student outbreak was the several hundred members of an or- j newest manifestation of internal ganization known as "socialist i unrest following the March 18 es- youth" who had occupied buildings j propriation of 17 British and Amer- of the University of Mexico. jican oil companies. The "socialist youth" force, arm- i Associates of the agrarian leader, ed with pistols and knives, seized j General Saturnine Cedillo, charged and firemen to eject them. ministration's troubles. LekeSiWand Reform Bill's i Deal Is Closed Revival Talked bring more refineries here. (2) Whole hearted cooperation, and help expand all our existing industry. (3) Advertise Abilene's outstand- ing industrial fire insurance rates: cheap gas for in- dustrial fuel; adequate railroads and nearness to raw materi- mohair, grain, cattle, and agriculture. (4) Study feasibility of establish- 1 ing cotton mill, tannery, flour factory, and hosiery j Make Abilene j attractive that all existing industry Police Chief Eale Dunn of Disney, Okla., posted the sign above and put; a damper on the whoopee program of ex-show giri Billy Baker, who had been elected temporary boss of the boom town. Flans had called for an election to determine the damsite town's future course after the whoopee forces had ruled a month and a sound sleep party had had a trial. Chief Dunn proclaimed to all: "While I am in the saddle I rule or I resign." LOCAL WOMAN FAIALLY HURT AS CAR UPSETS NEAR GUTHRIE Mrs. J. E. Puett Loses Control Of Automobile When Door Flies Open emoon in a Eamlin hospital a few hours after passersby had found her pinned beneath her automobile about nine miles south of Guthrie. j. nr Funeral was set for 4 o'clock this afternoon at Gorman. Burial j I U will be made in a Carbon cemetery.---------------. JVA Act Chal ISHQe Order Cuff ing City Rate To 32 Cents Involved i j Supreme Tribunal Voids Ruling By Appellate Court I WASHINGTON, May j supreme conrt re- I turned to Tesas courts today j for further proceedings litiga- tion involving a 1933 order by i the Texas railroad commission 'directing the Lone Star Gas company to reduce from 40 to 132 cents per thousand cubic its charge for gas sold to distributing companies in 275 Texas municipalities. HUGHES READS VERDICT i Chief Justice Hughes, delivering the opinion, said the Texas court; of i civil appeals had held that the gas i company had not "sustained its I j burden of proof because it had j i failed to make 'a proper segregation i of interstate and intrastate prop- erties and business'." Hughes said the "determination i of the court of first instance as the trier of the facts that the com- 1 mission's rate was confiscatory could not properly be set aside by i tiie application of an untenable standard of proof and in disre- 1 gard of toe evidence which, had been appropriately addressed to the commission's findings and had been properly submitted to the jury." Justice Black dissented and Jus- tice Cardozo did not participate. The supreme court reversed ruling by the Texas court of civil appeals holding the city gate rate of 32 cents to be "just, reasonable and valid in every particular." ENVOY RECALLED The woman was found about 10 o'clock Sunday morning Jie door. Tne car edged off .the highway. City Purchases j Cox, Manly Tract I For Cash the closing of s j 'Must' Not Put On Measure In White House Conference WASHINGTON, May I deal, the city of Abilene has ac- President- Roosevelt discussed with I quired all except two small tracts j congressional leaders today the pos- j cf land in the Fort Phantom -nill Ability of reviving his once-defeat- j lake site, j The S102.9D9-wfts-4nvolved in the purchase of Cox and Manly E. Manly. Den- i nis Manly, and Sam Cox, Jr. I price was S57 an acre. j In the deal, the city assumed and j majority leader, said. i paid off two debts against the land, j other" conferees reported there ione to the Fanners Merchants j was a discussion of the government reorganization bill, but there was ao indication a def- j decision was reached. i (iiscussed reorganization, but! The j there nc put On it." Rep- jiesentative Raybum house j may expand and new diversified j turned over and was right side up} industries be attracted here. I straddling a barbed wire fence with j TRADERS' SUGGESTIONS j Mrs'. Puett entangled in the wire j Among the retail and wholesale underneath the machine when the j trade activities, the leaders enum- I Maples reached the scene. The j e-ated the following five activities. I Maples brought Mrs. Puett to the; which should be undertaken by the Hamlin hospital where she died at j chamber cf commerce: p. m. She died of internal in- Continuously advertise Abi. I to her home here. She had spent lene as the logical trading center j for our vast trading area. (3) Redouble efforts to "survivors include her husband and a daughter, Mrs. W. G. Davis 2 Die As Truck Crushes Auto Trucker Held In Brownwood Jail To Face Charges BROWNWOOD, May See COUBT, fg. 9. Col. 4 Millionaire's Son Willed Only NrTnT YORK, May Eipsha Waterman, elder son of Frank D. Waterman, multi-million- aire fountain pen manufacturer, was cut off with only S100 in the Minister Primo Villa Michel, above, and his legation staff in London were recalled by the Mexican foreign relations de- partment as Mexico severed diplomatic relations with Great Britain, "in view of the un- friendly attitude" of the Brit- ish government, it was stated. Bands To Have Local Sponsors Assignment Of Visitors To Homes Near Completion Each band arriving in Abilene for the Region Six, National School Music Competition festival begin- ning Thursday will have an Abi- lene couple as sponsors. Decision to secure local sponsors for the out-of-town was- made this morning at a special meeting of the convention committee. These spon- sors, to assist the bandsters in ev- ery way, are to be selected this aft- Assignment of band private homes was being: completed today. Tomorrow, each, home to which one or more band, members have been assigned will receive a. card notifying them when, to expect.their 2-iests.. Owners of homes which are not needed will be notified that their rooms are be- ing held on the reserve list. As final report of the housing committee, R. T_ Bynum issued a formal statement of appreciaticSr to Abilenians for their hospitality. will of his father on file today for i probate. j The son was disowned 13 years j appreciation of the hospitality ago when he married a Canaaian j -oy Abilene's citizens in op- "On behalf of the ha said, "I want to express my deep congressional situation ana mat National bank and the other W, J. Behrens. Uome believed the legislature should For nearly two months, the able to quit early next Indications of increased willing- ness in congress to follow the pres- leadership encouraged 1 had been pending. Tne purchase. 'aside from the amount involved, i was important because the site of i now under construction, was on issues i administration See C-C. PIT. 9. CoL 3 Seven Sentenced In Mail Pouch Theft Dismiss Case Against Cathey i LTJBBOCK, May 16. j of eight defendants charged by in- i i of Fort Worth. Name Winners In History Contests Wyatt, 39. and her 19 months old daughter, Ann Ola, were j killed yesterday afternoon and Will j D. Wyatt received critical injuries when the light sedan in -which they were riding was crushed beneath a j truck loaded with cattle. j The accident occurred seven rniles j girl against- his father's wishes. His wife died in 1928 from an overdose of sleeping potion. dictment leaders to believe the bill might be I CC-i V the j the Cox-Manly land. It was nee- j rushed through at this session. a U. S. Jean Sidd of the Cedar Gap school essary that the city, in the con- I struction of the dam. also make provision for the out-take and pumping, said Mayor Will W. Hair. The purchase was finally closed in a special meeting of the city com- mission Saturday afternoon. This administration has purchas- ed two other tracts of land in the lake site. Mrs. .Adelaide Thomas was paid for 231 acres, about an acre. Then 102 acres were bought from Mrs. Newton for j an acre, a total of The city has been negotiating The house pigeonholed the meas- j lire last month, but two democratic j members now are conducting a sur- j vey to determine whether there j has been any change of sentiment; among opponents. j There has been no public indica- tion that any appreciable number of representatives would switch their positions. Democratic Leader Rayburn of Texas commented: "I would be glad to have a re- organization bill passed at this ses- j connection n November o mail pouch containing in cash and currency this morning en- competi ;erea pleas of guilty before Judge Shep placed first and Bemice Le-j William H. Atwell, jucse presiding over the May term cf federal court here, enced t6ntia Kans. Fort Leavenworth, Chamberlain Shakes Up British Cabinet Air Minister Resigns Post LONDON. May 16. Minister Chamberlain today an- nounced a realignment of his cabi- net, sending Sir Kingsley Wood. minister cf health, to replace Vis- count Swinton, secretary of state for air. target of charges by all par- ties that Britain's aerial reanna- Swinton resigned from the cabi- net as a. result of last week's up- rising in the house of commons in which critics charged that Britain's Tom McGehee, county superintend- {ear was torn off. The Wyatt car arr defense program was being far Winners announced today in the Taylor county school district history contest which has been held east of Brownwood on U. S. high- j in the county schools. j way 84, soon after the Wyatts had Martha Ruth Denton of White i their farm home to visit their j Church school won top honors in daughter in Brownwood. Both ma- j the seventh grade contest and Elva; chines were traveling downhill. The j struck from behind ranked second. In the eighth grade tnid- and cnished. competition Phyllis Jean Shedc Butterfield won second.'the baby succumbed on arrival at vrets of Senior honors went to Gracie Leeja Brownwood hospital. Wyatt suf- and were immediately sent- Farr of Wylie and Wilson fractures of legs, a brok- xi to terras in the federal peni- also of Wyue. iP't _ _ "Tr-in. nf rhp rfvn-ps" arm. cneSu injuries, rui le-u ar. ?Yvrr. Ane ODjeCt Oi i-ne cuiKCi., rite a history of the cis- RIO DE JANEIRO. May 15. Morris of Kerrvilie. two the accident. District At- mentary and financial secretary to Newman was to file .egligent homicide to turn down an offer of joumment are increasing, however.! I an acre bv Lindsev. survived by her _. liusband, two children, her parents i and democratic chieftains are mak- i rears, suspeaaea for three years on j A press cispatch from Sao Paulo ling every effort to clear the con-! sood behavior: Sidney A. Miller, j today reported that an Italian brokers, Spur and Dallas, 30 months in j newspaperman, Cesare Rivelli, cor- rangements had not been Jjeavenworth and a fine of i respondent for La Gazetta this rnoming. Carl S. Williams. Brownwood. 30 j Popolo of Turin, had been arrested j------------------------------------------ months; Rufus K. McNurlen of near in the aftermath of las' Wecnes- i i Borger, two years. j cay's intesrralist (fascist) uprising, j gressional slate by the middle of June. A senate appropriations subcom- Sce CONGRESS. Pgr. 9, Col. 8 Each question counts 20: each part of a two-part question. 10. A score of 60 is fair: 807 good. ANSWERS ON PAGE 6. 1. What is the name of this poet who was inaugurated as president of Eire (Southern Ireland) 2 President Roosevelt's va- cation cruiser changed its course because of (a) an SOS message from a freighter,   now goes j to the house where a similar bill is j pending. Before the vote. McCarran recon- sidered his announced decision to ask defeat of the bill. Jim For Cousin AUSTIN, May 15. Wood is thicker than water, former Governor James Ferguson said today he would vote for a cousin, James A. Ferguson, farmer and real estate man of Eelton. who an- nounced his candidacy fqr governor over the weekend. NEW YORK. May quiet little community within an hour's drive of New York's most congested districts will experience an air raid tonight mock one. of course to dramatize the necessity of "blacking out" vulnerable big cities in wartime. A squadron of bombing air- planes will sweep over the vil- lage of Farmingdale. Long Is- land, dropping flares in an at- tempt to locate two aircraft factories. Sirens will scream, anti-air- craft searchlights will spear the sky, and every light in the vil- lage, a logical "military objec- tive" of enemy bombers if this f country went to war. will be quenched for 30 rr.inutfs. The "blackout." the first in the United States, will be engi- neered by the general head- quarters air force with the, aid of Farmingdale officials as a spectacular finale to the army's air maneuvers along the North Atlantic seaboard. Using the center of the vil- lage as a compass point, war game umpires have drawn a. circle around it with a racius of two and a half miles, within which tights will be turned off. Villagers have agreed to turn off household lights. Every road entering Farnringdale will be guarded, and motorists in- side the circle will be by police to park beside the road and snap off their headlights. Then the bombers come over, they will be "intercepted" by a fleet of pursuit planes whose normal function is to give bat- tle to enemy pursuits and try to shoot down enemy raiders. At the same time, ground anti- aircraft 'Batteries will open up with blank ammunition. The air raid and will be a novelty in tills coun- try, though regular air raid drills are held in England, Ja- pan. Italy. Germany and other countries without wide oceans on either of them. r.oor. KAST TEXAS: Probably shourers arrf Tutsday. Highest yetcrdav Lowest temperature this Tr.orr.ir.g SECRET MEETINGS I Report Japs In Philippine Island Being Trained In Use Of Gas Masks And Arms .6S TEMPERATURES jdisuatch today from its Davao he QUOted sun. Mor.. respondent saying he had learned need an expert Filipin Rcuuvt buaidiu- MANILA, May The holding secret meeinigs. Dsilv Bulletir. published a special! "We investigated but didn't -an- idfcrstand what they were talking as saying. pino inter- '1'j i confidentially that thousands of i preter who has gooc knowledge of -0 i Japanese in that province were the Japanese language." S3 holding secret meetings at which Residents of Davao province have 63; tliey received careful instructions in i been uneasy since the appearance gf j use of gas masks and firearms. j some weeks ago in Davao gulf of ss; Rumors have been current, the; what was described as a fleet of dispatch said, that Japanese of that I ships. A Japanese spokesman 76 j region have been manufacturing j at Tokyo said later the ships were 21 firearms in isolated mountains of I Japanese fishing vessels. province. Approximately Japanese The Bulletin's correspondent i live" in Davao province, most of iwiote thai Major Leon Reyes, Da- j them on nemp plantations. Fili- i vao provincial commander, had pinos claim tliat many of them hold Isaid he knew the Japanese Illegally,   

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