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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: May 12, 1938 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - May 12, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               -WITHOUT, OR OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES, WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT I VOL LVI I, NO. 353: Associated Press   ABILENE, TEXAS. THURSDAY EVENING, MAY 12, 1938-TWELVE PAGES PR ICE 5 CENTS I Rowena Men Killed In Crash Near Bellinger Automobile And Truck Collide On Angel o Highway ARMY WASPS OVER MANHATTAN 3ALUNGER, May Rowena men, Ed Kunkel and L. E. McCoy, were crushed to death in wreckage of their autcniobile in a head-on collision a truck on the San Angelo highway six -miles west of here today. Dean Young of San Angelo, driv- er of the truck, and J. R. Young, also of San Angelo, received minor injuries. Young said he pulled the truck off the pavement in an effort to avoid the crash. Crowbars were used in an hour-long effort to extricate the mangled bodies from the light coach. The victims had started to Win- ters where Kunkel, about 40, as manager of a Eowena gin, was su- pervising the overhauling of a gin, and McCoy, about 28. was assist- ing. The truck was going to San Angelo. McCoy, manager of a gin at Hatchell, is survived by his wife, two sons, Tommv and Eidon; a daughter. Marian: his parents. Mr. and Mrs. T. K. McCoy of near Waco, and two sisters. Mrs. Hubert Ger- hart of Kowena and Marjorie Ruth McCoy. McCoy, familiarly known as Jack McCoy, will be buried Friday aft- ernoon in Protestant cemetery at Rowena following funeral services at 3 p. m. at the Rowena Baptist church, with the Rev. J. D. Cole- inan officiating. The funeral of Kunkel will be held Saturday at p. m. at the Rowena Lutheran church with bur- fsJ in Lutheran cemetery there. The Rev. A. Romanoski will officiate. King-Holt Funeral home of Bal- linger is in charge of both funerals, I Darting through the sky I above America's largest city, these swift pursuit planes gave New Yorkers a demonstration j of the sort of defense the U. S. 1 array would put up if real en- emy tombing planes attacked Manhattan. Actually, the planes j chasing an irnaginery j ensmy during G. H. Q. air ma- j neuvers at Fort Totten, Long j Island. j Britain Demands Mexican Funds LONDON. May de- mand OB the Me7pr-n gor-r-nment for immediate payment of 370.962.71 pesos i at current- rate of SS8.000) for British losses in revolutionary actions between 1510 and 1S20 was made public demand in which Britain pointed out- to "ap- parently discriminatory treatment" in favor of the United States. The text of the demand, made under the Anglo-Mexican special claims convention, showed it was presented yesterday in Mexico City by Minister Owen St. Glair O'Mal- iev. The note pointed out that a sim- ilar debt to the United States gov- ernment had been punctually dis- charged "and his majesty's govern- ment are at a less to understand this apparently discriminatory treatment of two governments with equal title.'' Britain used the representation again to crave attention to the March IS expropriation of British oil properties among those of 17 foreign concerns. Identify Car Thieves As Westex Fugitives DALLAS. May fu- gitives from a West Texas jail, one the brother of the late Raymond Hamilton, were identifeid by a Dal- las salesman today as the pair which commandeered his car at Terrell early today and forced him. to drive them to Dallas. W. J. Farley, Dallas, picked out police photographs of Ho'yd Hamil- ton and Ted Waiters as the men who curbed his machine at Terrell and commandeered another auto- mobile after leaving him in Dallas. Hamilton. Waters and Ervin Goodspeed. later captured, fled the Montague jail several cays ago after stabbing the jailer. France Cuts Rate PAULS. May bank! of Prance lowered its discount rate today from three to two and one- half per cent. The Weather ABILENE and vicinity: Partly cloudy with showers tonight; Friday uiwettlec WEST TEXAS: Partly ciOKfly to- nlsJu and Krxay cooler in southwest ana south cer.trai portions tonight EAST ThlXAS: Partly cloudy tvnh showers in north portion Friday unsettled, showers in interior except in northwest portion. Highest temperature yesterday Vargas Full Military Action Invoked To Wipe Out Greenshirts; 500 Revolters Jailed RIO Brazil, May strong man president. Gretulio-Vargas, invoked full military and police action today to wipe cut forever fascist gxeensMrts, whose three and one-half hour rebellion failed "because they did not know the government palace was without a garrison within its walls. Police, with 500 cf the rebels already in jail spread through the city, searched every suspected fascist's home, made more arrests and found evidence the revolt was well planned but without coordinatsd execution. LIFE ENDANGERED The rebels made their attack yes- terday morning against President Vargas' palace, the residence of the chief of staff of the army, and other strategic they lacked the one vital piece of information that could have carried them to at least momentary success. J. Alberto Lins Da Barros. former Selassie Loses League Fight GENEVA. May last hopes of Haile Selassie of blocking an Anglo-French move to recog- charge d'affairs who helped aereno. nize Ttaiy-s conquest of his Ethio- the president's palace, told abcu todav. pian empire "I believe the attackers did not i majority of know the oals-ce was wise they would have advanced into the palace instead of fighting in the he said. "The truth is the president's life vanisned toaay as a the delegates of the League of Nations council declared m favor of recognition. The council members' judgment late tcday came after a morning session in which the fallen Sthio- Vargas, with his dark-eyed 23- _ year old daughter. Donna Aizyra. i against recognition and demanded ana only live others were inside tnar issue be taken to the whole ready to fight off the attackers from blv palace windows, but fighting outside 1- The black-gar apparently convinced the rebels they faced a strong body of defend- ers. Arriving reinforcements saved the palace and the attackers capit- vian "The grea -uc sat si- lent at the council table as the president. Wilhelm Munters. Lat- ninister, summed up: TV ci V 3 uiatec. Vargas, his position as dictator ap- TVl ,s in_ parentiy strengthened, invoked mar- -te- iS iC- in tial law to carry on punitive action against the revolt which ended at: cnocse- dividual members to decide as they a. m. yesterday, with 12 dead and 22 injured. 7 German Bankers Arrested in Probe RIO DE JANEIRO. May officials cf s. branch cf a Berlin banking institution were under arrest today, charged See BRAZIL, Pg. 31. Col. Proponents of recognition, chief among them Britain and France. considered this summation and the preceding declarations .left league states free to recognize Italy's king as emperor of Ethiopia. Opens Headquarters AUSTIN. May 12. VP Coke Stev- enson, candidate for lieutenant gov- ernor, opened state headquarters here todav. Band Housing Sighted, Other Plans Pushed Quarters For 900 Reported At C-C Office With the housing situation ap- parently under control, committee members for the Tri-State band contest today turned their atten- tion to other details of properly car- ing for the competition. Report of the housing committee this morning showed that accom- modations Tor 900 band students had been received yesterday at the chamber of commerce office. Reser- vations for three or four hundred additional persons were expected today from members of the Band Parents association. Requirements, so far as was known, were for bandsters. Chief problem before the com- mitteemen this morning was the setting up of an office organiza- tion through which a complete di- rectory of every student entered in the competition can be kept. Each student will be assigned an indi- vidual card on which will be listed the student's name, home address, competitions he is entered in and his Abilene address. These cards are to be listed al- phabetically and kept on file at the band tournament; headquarters at Fair Park. By this method, any student can be located at any time during his stay in Abilene. TO START INDEX Work on the card index will start tomorrow- so that as the bands arrive in Abilene each student will be sent immediately to his head- quarters hsre. The method is ex- pected to eliminate a great deal of the confusion which usually goes with the registration of such a large number of people. Records today showed that the list of towns to be represented has reached the ico mark and 43 bands. three more than the original esti- mated, have been, entered in the concert competition and six are entered only in the marching con- test. The Abilene high school band was officially entered on the list today. Another matter being taken up this week is the reception for the 10 contest judges who will begin arriving in Abilene Wednesday night. The subject of transporta- tion cf the bands is also being tak- en under consideration and final prepare lions are being made for j nation-wide exhibits of band uni- j See BAND, Pg. 9, Col 3 AS HOUSE VOTE HEW PHYSIO-THERAPY DEPARTMENT AT LOCAL HOSPITAL A view in the new physio- therapy department of Hendrick Memorial hospital is shown in this photograph by Thurman. It servance of Hospital Day. The hospital management has invit- ed the public to visit all depart- ments during the day. New dia- open today to visitors, in ob- thurmy units are shown at left. Mexico's Return Of Oil Property 'Absurd' BROWNSVILLE, May Dr. Francisco Castillo Najera, Mex- ican ambassador to Washington, to- day termed a reported as- sertion by Gen. Nicolas Rodriguez, chief of the outlawed (fascist) gold shirts, that President Lazaro Car- denas would order expropriated oil properties returned to their former owners. Najera. en route by air. to Mexico City from Washington, said Rodri- guez is nothing" in Mexican affairs today. Asked about Rodriguez' claim that 800.000 gold shirts followed him. he said "That's a dream he had." Rodriguez' present headquarters are in Mission. Tex. Air Raid Launches New Rebel Drive HENDAYE. May tionalist planes bombed the work- ers districts of Valencia in s. night raid which heralded the beginning to-day of a new major offensive by Generalissimo Francsico Franco to cut Madrid's life line to the Dedit- erranean. The Spanish press agency reported that nationalist bombers came over Valencia at p. m. last night in a surprise attack. They returned at midnight. cropping tons of bombs which caused great damage in the district of Grao and The agency said homes were de-, stroyed and it was feared that cas-; ualties would be high. Rails Give Pay Slash Notice. Estimate 15 Per Cent Reduction To Affect Million WASHINGTON. May 12. American railroads today tbrmaliy notified railway labor that they reduce basic wages 15 per cent on July 1. The wage cuts, which rail labor leaders have announced they "will resist, would affect an estimated 1.000.000 workers. BY JOINT COMMITTEE The action was announced by the carriers' joint conference committee, representing the entire railroad in- dustry. "This action is compelled by ditions now confronting the railroad a statement by the com- mittee said, "We wish the public railroad employes to know what those conditions are, because both the national welfare and welfare of railroad men are necessarily de- pendent upon the welfare of the basic transportation industry of the country." The action of the carriers, cal- culated to save annual- ly, invokes the machinery of a lengthy arbitration and mediation system provided, by the railway la- bor act. That statute provides for conferences between management and labor in an attempt to reach rn agreement. Resistance by rail labor would delay final decision on the reduction far beyond July 1. George M. Harrison, president of the railway labor executives' com- mittee, has stated that labor will refuse to accept any wage reduc- tions. The carriers' committee said that the railroad industry "faces a crisis more difficult than in 1932." Pres- ent problems are "due to the sim- ple fact that present costs of opera- Concert Pianist Arrives Here To Judge Contests the electrocardiograph at the right. 'The physio-therapy de- partment is for treatment of crippled children, bone inflam- mations and similar cases. Open House At Susan Griggs. known throughout I the world as concert pianist, is in i I today to serve as judge for j I the Abilene unit" of the National Piano Playing tournament Miss j Griggs, who recently made her de- I but at" 'Steinway New York. j arrived -here too late to begin judg- j j ing contests this morning. j j Floydada pupils were the first to i I play ia- the tournament, which got off The thro pubii Fine mon tour tion are nigner can carry unccr it said. sting wes SUSAN GRIGGS to a delayed start at I o'clock, programs, which continue ugh Saturday, are free to the (c. They are being held at the Arts building. Kardui-Sbn- s. S. Sdwln Young is the local nament director, is three-dav meeting is attract- 200 pianists from all parts of t Texas. DECIDE WHERE, BY County Judge Has Much Power Over Beer Permits Lowest th .orr.ir.p IFERAT L-RKS Wed. p.m. a.m. RS 65 66 65 63 63 65 66 70 75 75 69 75 _______ CLOUDY 7 P.TO 7 a.m p.m. Dry thermometer S3 63 SI Wtt thermometer 62 !i" 66 Relative humidity 31 70 45 I County Judge Lee R. York is making no official statement as to 'what his official attitude would be I if the sale of beer is legalized in county, but all beer sale i permits, zoning ordinances and sim- jilar restrictions would be in his i jurisdiction. I "Because of the wiric jurisdiction 'given the county judge In recom- mending beer sale permits, desig- jnatdng sections where beer may or may not be sold, setting closing (hours for places selling beer and similar matters." said Judge York, "many persons would like to know ir> advance what my attitude would be if the law should pass. However, I am trying to stay entirely clear or this election, be fair to both sides.' but try my to nothing might in any way Influence I the vote, so I do not feel that I snould make any o i Under the state law. the county judge has almost dictatorial powers the initial grantirfc of per- mits. Application for permit must i first be made with the judge, who !must set hearing for the appl- ication within not more than 10 nor i less than five 'rDin the date I the application is filed. At the hearing, the judge ex- amines the application, and if there I are no reasons for refusing the per- iroit he may approve the applica- tion. i The first reason for refusal to i grant a permit is untruth in the application. The permit may be and must be refused if the ap- plicant has been convicted of a felony within two years previous to the filing of the application. It may be refused if the applicant has ever convicted of break- ing the laws governing the sale ol intoxicating beverages. Mast im- portant of ail. it may be refused if the judge has any reason to believe rhat the applicant would sell beer to a minor, conduct a place in a disorderly manner, sell beer to an intoxicated person, conduct his See YORK, Pjr. II, Col. 6 Rites Pending For Boird Pioneer, 84 BAIRD. May 12. neral for W. R. Wace. 84. resident of Baird over 50 years who died yesterday in his room, was pending word from relatives today. The body is at Wylie Funeral home. Tom Bracheen found Mr. Wade in his room a: 5 p. TCI. Doctors said that a heart attack caused his death. Survivors are two sons. Will Wade of Longview. ar.d John Wade of San Antonio: three daughters. Mrs. Bob Peck of Bairc. Mrs. Mable Penninger of Albany ar.d Mrs. Jes- sie Reed of California. Mr. Wade was preceded in death by his wife who diec about two years ago at San Antcnio. Special Cachets For Air Mail Week Abilene will be among a hundred other Texas cities with specially de- signed cachets for use or. air curing national Air Mail week. May Among other cities with special cachets are Amarilio. Arlington. Beaumont Cisourne, Corpus Eastland. El Paso. Fcrt Galveston. G'.adewater. Hen- derson. Port Arthur. San Antonio. T v 1 e r Waxahachie. Waco and Wichita Fails. Many of the cities are not or. mail routes, but cachets will be stamped on letters going out May 19 in the special feeder service to central points. Local Institution Participating In National Week By BROOKS PEDEN open .house day at the Hendrick Memorial hospital. In co- operation "vrith other hospitals of the United States celebrating Na- tional Hospital Day, the adminis- i tration and staff of the HsndricS j Memorial hospital iave issued an invitation for all men. women and I children of West Texas i to 'visit the institution. I "This is the first time that this i hospital has held a formal observ- ance of National Hospital commented E. M. Collier, superin- tendent, Wednesday afternoon. "W3 i have no idea how many people will j accept our invitation, but arf hop- ing for s. new record number of visitors. "We have two goals which we hope to reach today. The first is- :ro let the people of Abilene, many i cf whom have never been in the know just what kind of an institution they have in their city. The other is to help overcome the more cr less general fear of hospitals. Years ago. a hospital was a place to go to die. Now we want people to realise that hospitals j throughout the country are fighting '24 hours every day to prolong life and to heal the diseases and ail- of humanity. "We are particularly interested in having a large number of children visit with us today. It is often hard 1 to get parents to send their children to hospitals, and the children them- selves are reluctant to come. Yet, when they have been here a little while and realize that no one will hurt them, but everyone will do everything in their power to make See HOSPITAL, 9, Col. I Miss Texas Picked AUSTIN. May 12. ment of Miss Ernestine Melton of Texarkans, student at the Univers- ity of Texas, as "Miss Texas" at the National Tomato shew and festival :rs Jacksonville June 7 was an- 1 r.ounced here today by Governor V. A'.lrec. Beat Move For State Rule By -39 Vote Liberals Lose In Attempt To Hike Funds For WPA WASHINGTON, May house beat down today a republican attempt to turn the administration of re- lief over to the states. The standing- vote was 106 to 39. GOP's TO TRY AGAIN Another amendment, to increase from to the proposed WPA fund for the sev- en months ending next January 31, was rejected by a standing vote, 61 to 23. It was proposed by the house liberal group. The first amendment to the lending-spending bill of- fered by Representative Bacon Ill- NY) was the minority proposal for decentralization of relief. It pro- posed to set up bi-partisan boards to handle relief funds and to re- quire states to put up 25 cents for SI contributed by the federal government. Republicans said they would make another attempt, just before a vote on passage of the bill, to put their program into the measure. Although conceding they had no chance of success, the minority members proposed forbidding use of i funds in the bill for competitive j projects of any sort. The democratic leadership, on the other hand, endorsed an amend- ment to let the Reconstruction Fi- nance corporation supply 000 additional for sending electrici- ty to rural areas. Leaders said they wouKL hold the house in session until it took a, final vote on the bill, probably early in. the evening. Representa- tive .-Woodrum in charge of the legislation, said it pass -mtaout' any trouble. Extra funds "for rural electrifies tative Maverick who said i the house liberal bloc had deliv- j ered an ultimatum that would have to be provided or its j members would vote for a proposal j of Representative Rankm, 1 to add I Maverick said Democratic Lead- 
                            

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