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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: April 24, 1938 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - April 24, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               O gbttme Reporter VOL. LVI I, NO. 336. "WITHOUT, OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES, WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT ABILENE, TEXAS. SUNDAY MORNING, APRIL 24, PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS. Paying Will Rogers TOM MIX MADE MEMBER OF COWBOY BAND PRICE 5 CENTS Tom Mix, now 58 but straight and lean as ever, came lo town yester- day with his famous circus and re- ceived a reception unlike any other he has had since he began operat- ing his show five years ago, He was made an honorary mem- ber of the world-famous Hardin- Slmmoiu university Cowboy band, and thus received an honor first accorded (o his old friend and neighbor Will Rogers. Mix was met at the circus grounds by Mayor Will Hair, Band Manager G. B. Satidefer, Wendell Bedlchck and J. Ransom Home, driving a new sport model Packafd on which the group rode to the business dis- trict. The Cowboy band, headed by Will Watson and Police Chief Hack- ney, mounted, led the Mix car through the business district to the lobby of the Hilton hotel, where a microphone had been set up by Station KHBC. Crowds, mostly children, lined the streets along the entire route, small boys continually shouting "Tom Mlxl Tom Sandefer told Mix that In the Cowboy band's travels in Europe and Mexico small boys invariably, upon seeing the musicians' cowboy hats, began shouting "Tom In the hotel lobby the band, directed by Marlon B. McClure, played several pieces, on the 15- miiiute Informal program broad- cast by KRBC. Mayor Hair welcom- ed Mix, saying that he had brought pleasure and entertainment to peo- ple all over the world, and espec- ially to children. Mix was present- ed a large framed picture of the Cowboy band, Hardin-Simmons of- ficials, and others taken atop Cheyenne mountain in Colorado several months ago at the Will Rogers Shrine of the Sun. It was See TOM MIX, tf. 8, Col. 1 LOOKING TO Three Way Merkel Rodeo Season Opened Veteran County Commissioner Canon Honored By HARRY HOLT MERKEL, April ca- pacity .crowd, side-stepping fickle spring showers, today attended opening of the Merkel free rodeo, sponsored by the merchants trade etxension association, entering Its filth year as a feature summer at- traction. They've been coming back in in- creasing numbers long since the "smart guys" tribbed rodeo a fad and something that would wither like Aprils peach blossoms. Yearly, Merkel Increased facilities for handling larger crowds and more there's still an over- flow attendance. However, this was a special oc- Canon Day, honoring Mr. Canon on Cano nday, honoring Mr. Canon on his 59th birthday. He has served as county commissioner 10 j-ears Many Taylor county officials were visitors.' In the 'forenoon a downtown pa- as Merkel's most staged Afterwards numerous prizes were awarded win- ners of different divisions. -The Merkel high school band led the event, followed by cowboys, cow- girls, rodeo officials, county offlcl See RODEO, Fj. 8, Col? 4 METHUSELAH' Nab Anson Women For Shoplifting. Police apparently stemmed a wave of petty shoplifting at Abi- lene five an ten cent stores with the arrest of three Anson women yesterday. Another escaped. The quartet, three of them mar- ried and all bstween the ages of 23 and 40, were making a round of variety and department stores pick- ing up small articles and carrying them away In shopping bags. A piatnclothes policeman was sent to follow them. As he watched, they stole articles in Woolworth's, McClellans. Grants and Montgomery Ward. When he was sure that they were guilty, he arrested three. The total value of the loot taken by the four amounted to less than S2. When notified of their arrest, Sheriff Jim Lee Gordon expressed surpise. All are well known In Anson, he The three arrest- ed were paroled to him awaiting complaints from Abilene store managers. Race Seen FDR Regains Parly's Helm Post Youth Dies In Snyder Hospital SNYDER, April Jim Lee Woodard. 15, junior in Post high school, died at o'clock to- night In R Snyder hospital, where he surgery 11 days ago. Jim was the son of of Mr. and Mrs. E. ll.'Woodard of seven miles cast of Justiceburg. Funeral arrangements ore Incom- plete. Service will be held at burg, and burial will be under direc- tion of Maples Funeral home of Enydcr. The Weather Nt: AND rottaMy toffl VlClMTt: Mrvslly l Biiowtn, cooler lo- 1VEST TfcVAS: I'artly cloniy today and proiuMy fttltrrrd In soiilhufM [-action; cooler In north portion Monday. I1AS.T AKXAS: OKf.AlUI'lA: i Monday DntrtTIrd atirl rool-r with NK1V MKMCU: fair (oAty rtnA Monday; eoolfr icmlnfajl ponton Itancr of jcitcntaj: .A.M. I [UlU 9 Ifl U -Vo-in .MtAnUht eo ntiA IftMT't lo 9 19 and ?ame o. K2 nM M. jfsVrdv, ".II; sunrtsc livdiy, l tor 21 hcmiV ending aC 9 p. ran with youth In the 42nd annual Boston A. A. mar- athon, u'hen 85-year-old Peter Fofey, of Winchester, Mass., turned out (or his 27th running of (he lull 26-jnile, 385-yard course. Pictured above as he plodded along tn gay, pink striped trunks, ht> said his wife didn't know he was running "although she was suspicious." Finishing the difficult course in 4 1-2 hours "just to show 'em there's life In the old dogs the white -whiskered ath- lete complained ot nothing more than a thirst. AngeloSiteOf Band Contests AHSToSend 180 Musicians To Three-Day Even't Approximately ISO Abilene school musicians, members of the Eagle band, elementary honor band, and the high school orchestra, will compete in West Texas band con- tests at San Angclo Thursday, Fri- day and Saturday. The San Angclo event, equivalent lo a state is preliminary to the national contests slated here In May. It will be staged under sponsorship of the Texas Band and Orchestra Teachers' association. Mare than 40 bands will compete in five classes, based on school en- rollment. Besides band and orches- tra contests, there be competi- tion for Individual solo awards, and for marching and drill. The Abi- lene orchestra will play Thursday, the honor band Friday and (he Eagle band Saturday afternoon. Marching contests will be conduct- ed Friday evening beginning at 5 o'clock. All bands arc required to enter that event. Abilene musicians who will enter Ihe solo contests are: Saretta Mor- row, violin; Dorothy Aman. violin; Alma June Page, violin; J. F. Den- nlngton, piccolo: E. R. Frlertsam, French horn; William Snow, bari- tone; Jerry Stevens, cornet; Alfred Samuel Waldrop, clarinet; Guy Kemper, saxonhone and drum ma- and Bill Sanders, drum ma- joring, in addition, several small ensembles will enter contests. Abilene's Party ToBelargest AtWTCCMeet Registration Ends Today; Motorcade Leaves Tuesday (See Pate 8 for additional news o( the West cham- ber of commerce contention.) E. H. Moore, general chairman of Abilene's motorcade to Wichita Palls Tuesday (or the West Texas chamber or commerce convention, predicted last night that the city would have the largest visiting 'egsflon at the regional conclave. "We arc practically cure ot go- ing over the top In our drive for 600 advance registrations." Moore said, Sale of registration badges here will close Monday morning, and Moore has asked that all ticket sellers check !n with their reports at the chamber of commerce build- Ing before noon. AFTER COMPROMISE- Observers View Recent Tactics As Significant By K1RKE L. SIMPSON WASHINGTON, April Definite progress President Roose- velt has made In the past two weeks toward regaining leadership of his own party in congress is of more Immediate consequence to the administration than outcome of the liberal conference just called by Gov. Philip Lafollette of Wis- consin. Governor LaFollette's call for a meeting of liberals next Thursday raises possibility of a three-cor- nered presidential ract'in 1040. But this threat of a third party candidacy is still a matter of specu- lation rather than fact, and 1940 is two years away. TACTICAL ADVANTAGES On the other hond, Roosevelt's recent tactics ;may have prompt political results. Direct White House pressure forced iiipon rebellious ssnate demo- crats a tax revision compromise providing the business criticized undistributed profits lax should be retained In a greatly-modified form. This gives the president at least a tactical advantage in hts apparent effort lo make this year's democratic primaries and general elections H test of the administra- tion's popularity with the voters. Both house and senate are ex- pected generally to approve the tax compromise. Their acceptance of it may in- fluence final out- come of the re- newed White House drive to write a wage- hour act Into the statutes at tills session. In event both the tax bill com- promise and a rewritten wage- LaFclIefte hour bill were forced through con- gress by presldciilial pressure, Roosevelt could go to the country during the campaigning with a new slate of leadership accomplish- ments to stress. 1 In his lending-spending message, the president made much of the fact he had recommended to this congress "only four measures o! major importance to business." He enumerated (he farm bill, legisla- tion to plug income tax loopholes, thg wage-hour bill and a measure revising the undistributed pro'lt tax "to remove inequities." The first two were already ac- complished, the president's message said, and the others were still be- fore congress. AIMING AT PRIMARIES If the tax revision compromise proves an accurate indication of the outcome of the wage-hour controversy, Roosevelt could write Uiat whole program off as achiev- ed, despite party rilts and demo- cratic-republican coalitions that have checked his legislative leader- ship increasingly ever since the court bill fight began In February, 1937. As further evidence of his regain- ing control, the senate's expected approval of the n.ivnl expansion bill next week not been ignored in presidential strategy. The navy bill already has been aproved over- whelmingly by the house. The president's strategv appears to be aimed first of all at demo- cratic congressional primaries. Abilene has received pledges of votes for next year's convention of the West Texas chamber of commerce, T. N. Carswell, secretary of the local chamber, said Saturday. "We probably can get more votes when we get said Carswell, "but other towns have already pledged us that number." Carawell said that only votes were cast last year. He is to leave for Wichita Falls today. The motorcade delegation will meet at the Hardln-Slmmons uni- versity campus not later than SM wrcc, Ff. g, coi. s Japs Penetrate Kiangsu Province SHANGHAI, April Japanese army spokesman said today the Rising Sun banner had been carried across the border into Kiangsu province when the re- organized Japanese offensive drove ft deep wedge Info Chinese lines in southern Shantung. The Japanese salient; lie said, was Jew. miles east of Talerchwang where the invaders suffered a smashing defeat April after they had occupied ihe city and crossed the border Into Kiangsu for the first time from the north. Insurgents Widen Coastal Wedge HENDAYE, Prance (At Spanish April Spanish insurgents announced to- night they had broken through government lines in three places in a new drive on ihe Teruel front They reported capture of the highway city of Aliaga, In the San Just mountains 32 miles northeas of Teruel, on the front some 160 miles east of Madrid. By capturing Aliaga, insurgents said, and break- ing through government lines near Valdeconejos to the northwest and Mollnos to the northeast, insurgent columns had encircled Etx brigades of government militiamen. Frisco Pirate Girl Misses Abilene Abilene missed a pirate InvasL.. yesterday by a mere technical cte- Zoe Dell Untis. "Pirate Girl" m the Golden Exposition and acclaim- ed (he most photographed girl in the Golden Gate Exposition and ac- claimed the most photographed sir] In the world, was booked to appear in Abilene Friday. Due to rearrange- to fulfill an engagement there, and v.'as to come lo Abilene Saturday. However another rearrangement yesterday caused the appearance to bo cancelled and she Hew on over Abilene to Dallas. Haskell Thieves Not Particular HASKELU April nimble-fingered shoplifters arrested here Saturday afternoon by mem- of (he sheriffs department evidently believed in overlooking nothing. Suspicious of their actions. Sher- iff Giles Kemp followed the pair and took them in custody when they entered their car. Search ot Ihe automobile revealed an assort- ment ot men's shirts, billfolds, silk hosiery, belt buckles, radiator caps, pocket knives, wnetstonrs. leather harness lines, hydraulic jacks guns, men's rhirt.s tie and belt clasps, fanrikcrchfcrs house shoes, fishing reels, towels and automobile accessories. EVENTS TO COME IN WEST TEXAS WEIN'ERT.-Future Farmers ol Wienrrt high school will stare their annual banquet Tuesday nfght. STANTON.-An election will be held in Martin county May 21 on the question of voting 000 bonds lo build the Stanton-Lamesa road from Stanton to Ihe Dawson conn ty line, and (o build another road Joining the iirst near Lenorah and running to the Andrews county line. or two old time dances will be held at the Anson high school gymnasium April 29 to raise money to pay for a trip to Washington by representatives of the Cowboys' Christmas ball. o n c d a y meeting of the Haskell county sins- ing convention win be held in the Hasxeil First Christian church May SANTA ANNA.-The senior play for Santa Anna high school's grad- uating cluss will be presented April SAN Texas high school band contest will be held Thursday, Friday and Saturday. COLEMAN.-Thlrty-flrst annual meeting of (he Woman's auxiliary of the Browmvood Presbytery will be held Tuesday and Wednesday. Adjournment Is Sighted Tax Bill Tops 'I LOVED MY HE SAYS Theodore Danlelsen Jr. ap- pears inconsolable as he lis- tens with his father to pro- ceedings during murder trial. Chicago TEARS FLOWING, YOUTH ASKS MERCY FOR RAGE SLAYING 'Whatever You Seek To Do With Me Will Be All He tells Court CHICAGO, April Cornelius J. Harrington today took under consideration the case of Teddy Danielsen, 18, who, in a mo- ment of blind rage, kilted the mother he loved. In a last dramatic scene before the judge took the decision under advisement, the slim blond boy stood with his father at his shoulder and weeping his love for his mother He said he couldn't have killed her If he had been in his right mind Sheriff Checking Only On.McAddjns; Car In Rrome Case ROBY, car is the last thing we have to said Deputy Sheriff Hayes Kemp or Fisher county tonight after learn- ing that gun taken from Ray- mond McAdams, young Royston man, had not been used in the Prome murders. Possible connection of McAlams with the case is being Investigated by the sheriff's office, through the gun ana an automobile he has been driving. Sheriff Frank Terry had sent the gun, a .32 caliber pistol, to the of public safety several days ago. Pair Linked With Series Of Holdups BRECKENRIDOB, April ficers of surr6undini! counties con- tinued today to investigate move- ments of two jeuths held In Stephens county jail m connection with a series ot armed .holdups of the p.ist two weeks. Joe Smith, fingerprint expert with the Stephens county sheriff's office, said tonight that officers had evidence to convict the pair in robberies In Eastland, Stephens, and Throckmorton counties. One of the men, Manuel Ward, 22, has been identified as a suspect wanted in robberies in Los An- geles and San Beranardino. Calif., through fingerprints taken by Smith. He is listed on California court records under six aliases. Officers tonight discounted any suspicion thrown on the pair In connection with the Frome mys- tery. Valuable Paintings Stolen In England CANTERBURY, Qigland, April at ail ports and were warned to be on the today for five famous paint- ings valued at which were stolen last night from the nth cen- tury chllham castle of Sir Edmond Dsvis, art collector. The paintings Included Rem- brandt's "Saskia dt Her valued at about Gains- borough's -Pit in Red and Van Dyke's "Man with Dog." Son Antonio First Seeker Breaks Leg BEAUMONT. April Buck Stanton, Son Antonio Mis- sions first baseman, suffered a broken Irg when he slid Into home plate here in the ninth Inning to- day. Stanton Is expected to be out He still had.no explanation of the powerful surge of emotion which to stabler with just want to say, Judge Har- that whatever you sttic' to with me, Till be all righV he blurted. you "to-know I loved niy Teddy's narrow, sioulders shud- dered and tears streamed down his cheeks. Theodore Danielsen. Sr., standing with his hand on Teddy's bowed hfs head and con- trolled his emotion with effort. Teddy'finished his little speech with a defiant reference to Prose- cutor Morris G. Meyers' closing don't care what Mr. Meyers .said, K I was in my right mind at that time I know I wouldn't hiive done it." Danielsen Sr. broke in: "And your father Is here to back It up. Your father knows if you go to the peni- tentiary your father and mother will be to blame." Father and son shook hands and Teddy was taken back to the coun- ty Jail to await the court's verdict. Judge Harrington said he would lake the cose under advisement and notify all parties concerned when he reached a decision, possibly with- in a few days. The state changed Ils previous today and demanded stern punish- ment. Emergency Farm Aid Petitioned GUYMON, Okl3., April The Southwestern Agricultural as- sociation, comprising 30 plains counties of Oklahoma, Kansas, Tex- as, New Mexico and Colorado today petitioned congress for in emergency farm aid for their counties. They asked for the same emergency listing and cover crop payment program as last year, and that halt ot the.cover crop payment be made available when the crop is planted. Congress' Aims For This Week Harrison Expects Drafting Of Law To End Monday WASHINGTON, April 23-WV- Leaders today arranged a heavy program for congress next week and. set June I as an approximate adjournment date. President Roosevelt Intends to complete his legislative recom- mendations during the week and leave Washington Friday for a fishing trip. Messages are expected from the executive on monoply, re- moval of tax exemptions on salaries of public employes and income from federal and state securities. Administration leaders on capitol hill hoped to send the tax re- vision measure to the White House next week, obtain senate approval of Ihe naval expansion bill and clean up i half-dozen odds-and' ends of legislation in the house. The president's multi-billion dol- lar spending-lendlng program will continue Its journey through the house apropriatlons committee. Drafting of a compromise tax Jaw lu the form it probably will go on the statute books hinged only on action of a senate-house confer- ence committee in reconciling num- erous details of separate bills pass ed by the chambers. Senator Harrison a member, forecast the joint commit- tee would complete its work Mon- day. Yesterday, the conference group agreed on a modified form ot the undistributed profits tax, which has been en- dorsed by Roosevelt It also ac- cepted with slight change a capita gains levy.voted by the senate inri approved I-' sJJKid' Conies? Opens Tomorrow Three Divisions In Photo Derby Abllene's youngest generation will parade before the camera lens the next ten days' to determine the city's "cutest kid." The Reporter-News, with Thur- man's studio, will settle, officially at least, the important question of whether "my Mary Is cuter than your Sue." Entrants In three babies under one year; babies over one year and under three and chil- dren over three and under alt- are invited to have their pictures made at Thurman's and published In the Reporter-News, Sunday May 8. Entries will be received starting tomorrow and continuing through Wednesday, May 4, at Thurman's and prizes awarded the winners in each division. A special souvenir will be given each child enlered the first day, Monday. No other pic- tures will be accepted except those made at Thurman's. An entry fee of SI will be charg- ed, entitling the entrant to have his or picture made and to have it published in the Reporter-News. Each entrant will receive a 5 by 7 black and white portrait. Big Spring Sends 'Big Jim'Touring Nation's Airways DETROIT, April Big Jim from Big Spring, Tex. fnto town today and left almost Imme- diately for Bt. Louis, on a publicity jaunt around country adverttlng national air mall week. The stunt was a brain wave of the Big Spring postmaster, who sent the toadstool, neatly boxed and accompanied by 15 stamped and addressed enve- lopes, on a nation-girdling air tour which began April 19. Bachelors Barred ROME, April cab- inet approved various domestic de- crees today, including one making bachelors Ineligible posts. for mayoralty Mother Finds Tot After Abduction AUSTIN, April 23- (iP) The frantic three weeks' search of a young mother for her four-year-old fan ended here to- day. She found the boy In an Aus- tin rooming house where he had been left by a man who did not re- turn. The child's blonde hair was dyed black and his skin covered with some kind of nut satin stain before JiU arrival in Austin. The reunited pair left tonight for Brownwood, where the mother's parents reside. Her husband was reported under arrest there on a vagrancy charge. Mine Rescuers Find 45 Bodies Squads Brave Poison Air To Explore Shaft GRUNDY, Vs., April Forty-five charred and broken bodies of miners were taken from, the seared depths of the Keen mountain mine of the Red Jacket Coal company today, victims of vol- cano-like explosions which greeted, the night shift as It entered the mine yesterdaj. United States Bureau of Mine of- ficials said no further bodies were in the "drifts" which extend fat- under thjj mountain. Sweating, sooty-faced members of mine rescue squads, worked in 30- minuie relays in the furnace-like atmosphere until they had explored, every avenue of the big mine. Two members were overcome by bad air which had to be blown out before) the final group of bodies could bo removed. miner.. narrow for hours, .fa tell fik eye-witness iccouii't of the dis- aster. He was standing 50 feet from the mouth of the mine when he heard the roar and taw llama belched from the mountain. "The blast was away from me. and that's why I didn't get he said. "I CKS, motors, slate and ''timber as if from a cannon." "AH evidence indicates the under- ground crew died said c. P. Kelly, chief mine inspector of the department of labor. South Pole Belongs To U. S., Prof Says PHILADELPHIA, April The South Pole and the Antarctic continent belong to the United States, the American Philosophical society wss told today. Dr. William H. Houbs of the-Unl- verslty of Michigan said the conti- nent originally was discovered by art American, but that a map of the Antarctic made by A New England sea captain was suppressed by Great Britain. -England later issued a new map to give that country priority; In the discovery, Dr. Hobbs said. Half Of Rural Aid Funds Is Issued AUSTIN. April per cent of the aid to be given Tex- as rural schools for bus transporta- tion of pupils was Issued today as State Auditor Tom King sent the approved claims to the state comp- troller for payment. The amount is and sup- plements a payment of to apply on salaries paid to rural school teschcrs. Funds are being speeded to enable the rural schools to hold full length terms. Sets Air Record WASHINGTON, April (UP) Lt, Col. Robert Olds, piloting one, of the army's new four-englned. fortresses, established a new trans- continental record today of 10 hours and 45 minutes, the War department disclosed. Nazis Push Vienna Purge Of Jewish Influences VIENNA, April tn Vienna were forced today to picket their own stores. Jewish shopkeepers were made to hold upwards at arm's tenglh signs reading "Don't Buy from Jews." Draped about the necks of per- sons found in Jewish establish- ments were placards proclaiming: "This stupid, common person still purchases at Jewish stores." Hundreds of SA (Broirnslilrt) Hitler youth directed the mass anti-Jewish boycott while German ol liie lineup at least six weeks, I officials began a purge of the fam- ed Austrian national library. The chief librarian was supplied with a list of proscribed "non- works to be removed and burned from Ihe 1.200.000 volumes In the magnlficant collection. Destroyed or relegated to cellars were the works of Thomas Mann, Stefan Zweig, Jacob Wassermann, Vlckl Batim and others. In the picketing of Jewish stores, Nazis put up signs, warning, "Ar- yans, do not buy from Win- dows of a leading coffee shop was smeared with three foot red letters One aged man, forced to hold aloft an anti-Jewish placard, faJnl- ed twice. He was revived by cold water thrown into his face, then made to carry on again. Store owners told police they were prci4ntcd from enforcing 7 p. m. closing regulations by pickets. They thereupon were threatened with arrest and a fine. In their brief weeks of domina- tion the nazfs have nearly finished their task of purging Austrian musle end theaters of ''non-German" and "Jewish" Influences,   

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