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Abilene Reporter News: Sunday, February 27, 1938 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - February 27, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               9 VOL, LVII, NO. 28.1. Five Abilenians Give McMurry Big Endowment Donors Contributing Not Named; Is Start Of A cherished dream whow fulfillment 'friends and adminis- trators of McMurry college had striven for the institution's founding in 1923 was in part realized Saturday with official an- nouncement that five prominent Abilene men had made endow- ment gifts to the school totaling Names of the donors were not disclosed. The announcement "WITHOUT, OR WITH OFFENSE TO FKJENDS OR FOES, WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS fT tEXAS, SUNDAYMORNING, FEBRUARY 27, PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS said simply the five men were members of the college's local board of trustees. TO BE HEUI IN" 1KUST Donation of the signalled actual start of a campaign devised at the annual meeting of the North- west Texas Methodist conference in Quanah last November, to raise an additional 5300.005 productive en Dr. Thomas W. Brabham will conduct two church services In Big Spring today. This morning, he will preach at the Wesley Methodist church In that city, and this evening he will be In the First church pulpit. He will conduct quarterly conference after each service, for Presiding Eider C. H. Young. dowment for McMurry. Gifts of the Iccal men will te held In Irust In an Abilene bank, contingent upon contribution of the remaining 000 by the Northwest Texas and Mexico confrences. Terms of the endowment plan as formulated at the Northwest Texas conference session were that the Abilene board of trustees would raise to be matched by an amount contributed by the confer- ence. The New Mexico conference at Us last annual meeting also vot- ed to participate in the drive as a separate unit. The Abilene district of the North- west Texas conference, comprising all of Taylor county and paris of Jones, Shackelford. Callahan and Nolan counties, is to raise the re- maining lo complete the S150.000 quota of the local board. Upon the eight other presiding ciders' districts of the Siamford, Sweetwater, Lubbock, Amarillo, Clarendon, Perryton, Ver- non and Big the re- sponsibility for securing the other less whatever amount li contributed- by New Mexico Metho- dists." The campaign to raise the remain- cler of the endowment fund will be launched immediately, said Dr. Brabham, and pushed to conclu- sion in five months. The first two months will be given over lo perfect- Ing organization of workers in each district and church. Bnd to cultivat- ing the endowment idea. The last three months will be devoted to con- tacting prospective donors, climax- ing In a general subscription drive on or about July 1. In each district of the Northwest See M'MURRY, ff. 11, Col. S IN WEST TEXAS high school band will be host to 25 other bands In a meeting here Saturday. zone meeting of the Methodist women's missionary soc- iety will be held at Coleman Wed- nesday. pro- gram for tile Ballinger postoffice will be held Monday, commencing p. m. WMESA.-Volers will go to the polls Wednesday to determine whether bonds will be Issued for of two new school construction buildings. Cnllahan County Ijvt- stock association will meet Tuesday In the county courtroom at Baird. Directors of the Cen- tra] West Texas Pair association will meet Monday night to elect new of- ficers aiirt plan the next exposition. HasXell county commissioners' court will meet Monday to receive and consider bids for construction of the Haskell County hospital. Board of directors for the Merchants Trade Extension as- sociation will meet Monday night to plan the 1938 entertainment pro- gram. Haskell county FFA and 4-K boys livestock show will be held here Monday. Fisher Boys Live-stock show will be held In Wednes- Breeders Swcetwatcr Tuesday and day. Sweelwater Hereford sale win be held Friday. BIG SPRINO.-BIg Springs' Boys Livestock show will be held and Wednesday. John B. Stribllng Here- ford sale will be held Thursday west TcxBsQtrls' Basket- ball tournament will be held Thurs- day, Friday and Saturday. U. S. Furthering Pan-Americanism WASHLS'GTCW, Feb. .--_ The United States government Is Hereford steer that first won the undertaking by many means to lightweight milk-fed division, and bring this country and Latin Amer- showed his other to a lean states closer together. Although denying this policy is a L-ounter-dffcnsIvc to fascist ?anda in south America, officials trimlltcd today it might have that effect. SETTLER PASSES PR ICE 5 CENTS MRS. J. T. ANDERSON Early Resident Dies In Alabama Came To Abilene In '82 After Four Years In Callahan Mrs. J. T. Anderson, who came to West Texas before the founding of Abilene, died Saturday in Montgom- ery, Alabama at the home of a A. Dayton.- Word was received by two sons. R. O. and Nat Anderson, Abilene oil men, that funeral service would be held in Memphis, Tennessee. Sun- day afternoon. Neither will be able to attend. Mrs. Anderson and her husband, the late Jack T. Anderson, settled In Eagle Cove, Callahan county, In 1878, and moved to the one-year-old town of Abilene in 18S2. Mr. Ander- son died in 1923. The couple were residents of Abilene until 1508. Mrs. Anderson was a guest of honor last March 15 when settlers of Abilene were leted in a bano.uet here. Survivors Include the two Abilene men, Mrs. Dayton. Mrs. L. M. Neb- lett of Memphis. Mrs. George S. Berry of Tulsn. Arch Anderson of Los Angeles, Jack Anderson of Houston. A daughter. Sally Brother- ton, died two years ago. Parading Governors To Hare Comfort AMARILLO, Not only Gov. E. W. Marland of Okla- homa, but all the other guest gov- ernors in the mother-in-law parade here March 9 will have "easy rid- ing" horses. Mason King, parade or- ganizer, said tonight. The committee announced today all horses in the parade would be shod with rubber shoes. Gov. Clyde Tingley of Nctv Mexico will bring his own favorite mount to Amarillo and has ordered a S1.500 saddle delivered here from El Paso. Among other governors In the parade will be Teller Ammons ol Colorado, Roy E. Ayres of Montana and James Allrcd of Texas. One Killed In Eostex Wreck ATHENS, Feb. H. By- ram, Jr., 18. of Malakoff. was killed and ten other persons were Injured. two of them perhaps fatally, late today In an automobile collision near Brownsboro. The Injured: Mrs. E. H. Byram, 37, and daugh- ter, Marcta Byram. 15, of Malakoff both believed fatally hurt. French Solons Okeh Cabinet's Foreign Policy Vote Endorses Following Great Britain's Lead PARIS, Feb. cham- ber of deputies tonight endorsed by 439 votes to two the government's foreign policy of sticking to France's centra) European allies and follow- ing Britain's lead for "realistic" dealings with fascist Italy and nazl Germany. The overwhelming vote of confi- dence came at the end of two days of debate. Supporters of the government and some of its enemies hailed It as evi- dence of Prance's unity In foreign affairs and leftists called It "bad news for Hitler." BEHIND CZECHS During the debate. Foreign Min- ister Yvon Delbos coupled a pledge that France's engagements with Czechoslovakia would be "faithfully fulfilled" with a warning that "the setting up of any political hegemony In the Danubian region Is not possi- Premier Camlllc Chautemps de- clared France never would aban- don alliances or her particularly Great said policy must be neither Isolation with her allies nor surrender. He affirmed that France's foreign policy still was pinned to the League of Nations. The premier mentioned France's 'riends in Europe and their inler- .'st in her foreign policy and then said: "Moreover, there Is the great American republic whose president from time to time gives us a great lesson of peace." The order of the day approved (he outline of foreign policy as given by the government and also ex- pressed confidence in the cabinet "to safeguard national dignity and assure maintenance of peace and respect for treaties within the framework of collective security and the league." WARNS GERMANY Delbos coupled his reaffirmatlon of French ties (o Czechoslovakia, as well as Rumania and Yugoslavia, with implied warning for Ger- many to keep hands off those middle Europe nations. As for Austria, Delbos declared her Independence remained a neces- sity. Delbos said France would: 1. Negotiate with Italy for recog- nition of her Ethiopian conquest "If the present difficulties can be ironed o.ut." 2. Maintain faith in the Franco- Sovlct mutual assistance pact. 3. Continue non-Intervention in Spain but "see that the Independ- ence of Spain Is respected." APPARENTLY LOSING BATTLE Howard County To Ballot On Beer BIG SPRING, Feb. Howard county voters will ballot on legalizing sales of beer and wine March 11, in accordance with a commissioners court order issued today in response to a petition bearing 840 signatures. Tne vote was authorised after an opinion from the attorney general's department held the referendum permissable. The county voted dry beverages1' last on "all alcoholic Dec. 10. Bomb Discovered In Bexor Courthouse SAN ANTONIO, Feb., 26-WV-A home-made explosive, rudely fash- ioned from a piece of old pipe, was discovered hanging from a door in the courthouse basement today The "bomb" had been substituted for one of the weights attached to the door between the basement hall and the courthouse basement gar- age. It bore several fuses, all of them wrapped in paper and un- lighted. B'Spring Man Dies Of Mishap Injures BIG SPRING, Feb. Funeral services will be held here Sunday afternoon for W. Ses- sion, 71, who died In B local hos- pital from injuries sulfercd when slruck by a car while crossing a street Friday night. The car was driven by Harold Walker who told authorities he SB-erred his machine In a vain at- lempt to miss session as lhc lat- ter stepped Into Ihc slrcet. CORNERS LIVESTOCK Gen. Pershing Slowly Sinking With Circus GAY PARADE TO GIVE SPRING NOISY GREETING Monday evening will be one of the brightest end gayest in history In downtown Abilene. At 7 o'clock the music of all four of the city's bands and the stirring roll of the drums of McMurry's Wah Wahtaytees will announce a street parade as th evening's first event marking formal opening of the spring season. Presenting a great array of spring merchandise for women, men and children, and home furnishings In the newest de- signs, business houses rill hold open houe from to 9 p. m. The stores have asked the Re- porter-News to extend to every person In the city and surround- ing territory invitations to pay visits during the evening and Inspect the new fashions for each member of the family. Following the parade, show windows, especially arranged for the event, will be unveiled and the store doors thrown open. In the parade will be the Wah Wahtaysees (girls' drum corps) of McMurry college, the Har- dln-Simmons university Cowboy band, the Abilene Christian col- lege Wildcat band and the Mc- Murry college Indian band. Marching also wllJ be rodfo stars, dozens of them, trick riders and others who will have parts in the West Texas Boys' Livestock show and World Championship Rodeo, to be opened here Tuesday at West Texas Fair Park. Among other features of the free parade will be midget horses hitched to i and other Interesting things from the Tidwell shows, exhibiting at Fair Park this week. Will W. Watson, on his white charger, will be parade marshal. PRECEDED BY Stage Set For Big Rodeo Show Inaugural Slated Tuesday THEY'LL PERFORM AT ABILENE RODEO There'll be thrills and spills aplenty when ace western per- formers uncork their pet. acts here Tuesday, opening of the three-day world championship rodeo. Shown here is a sample of the special events to be ex- pected. Ray and Morris Ram- of the Tulsa, Okla., Plying Clouds, were snapped in this photo as they jumped four horses Roman style over a five- foot hurdle with a six-foot spread. The boys also are trick and fancy riders. They have three sisters who will appear In trick roping numbers. HAMBY YOUTH KILLED, THREE SERIOUSLY HURT IN WRECK Car Rams Into Guard Rails On Bridge North Of Abilene; Clyde Watts Victim ,Cly.d? 3I- of Hamby was almost Instantly killed last night at oclock when the car in which he was riding with six other young people crashed throush the guard rails of the Elm Creek bridge on the nlrt Ansnn hidm-ov old Anson highway. Music Association Gets 400 Members Abilene's first use of Civic Con cert Service's plan for bringing great arllsts to the city is success- ful. The Abilene civic Music. tion's membership campaign ended last night with WO members en- rollsci, in addition to students of McMurry and Abilene Christian colleges. The former went into the association on a "blanket tax" basis, for each of its regularly enrolled stuficnts of next fall. The latter underwrote a block of regular Ju- nior memberships, which were The regular membership was The talent committee consisting of five persons selected by indivi- dual ballot of members of Ixiard of directors, will meet during the week-end. It will select from NBC's long list, or from among other artists, those who will come here next season. Hometown 4-H Boy Takes Four Firsts Af Roby BT HARRY HOI.T Krt.. ____ Bj HARRY HOI.T ROBY, Feb. L. Carter Jr., Roby 4-H club boy, was Ihe leading exhibitor of calves today In the third annual Fisher Counly  n Illness mis cuviui 10 uvercome in niness Tne inree prisoners, one man a from which even he believed there private in the army and the second would be no recovery. ORDERLY HOPEFUL At mid-day he failed to rally as "nd ball each by he did yesterday, and physicians U-_S. Commissioner Isaac Platt. saw In that lack of response a grave O. Shaffer, for 17 years sign. the general's orderly, nevertheless expressed the opinion Pershing would survive the night. Chief of Police C. A. Wollarid to- night assigned two motorcycle of- ficers to remain at the hospital in case of emergency. Heart stimulants brought a favor- able reaction shortly after midnight but at dawn, as dark clouds rollec up over the desert'the general loved so well, he again wavered. Through- out most of the night he had been under an oxygen tent. RELATIVES Their faces drawrKwfth anxiety Genera] Pfrshiog's only sister, Mia May- FershingY- and his son, Wir- ren, and nephew, Frank, moved In and out of the sick room. Early In his illness, a friend cUi Ste TERSHING, ft- 11, Col. I Tenor Collapses On Opera Stage NEW YORK, Feb. Glovannl Martinelli, tenor star of the metropolitan opera, fainted on the opera house stage today while struggling to complete a love song. While the audience sat in stunned silence, the famous Ita- lian tenor kept his feet until the curtain touched the floor. Then he dropped Into the arms of GIOVANNI MARTINELLI stage-hands who car- ried him to his dressing room. In Martinelli's dressing room, the opera house phj-siclan found the tenor was III of indigestion. The 52-year-old star's heart and pulse were normal, he said, and there was "nothing to worry YOUNG STOCKMEN Hundreds Of Animals lo Show WKh preliminary shows complet- mal hiisbandry department of Tex- as Technological college, Lubtock. will judge the beef cattle. Calves will be placed the opening day. Lambs and hogs will be Judged Wednesday with W. T. Magec. Shackelford county agent, and Ira passed Ihe Byrd of Vernon doing the placing. Sale of the prize animals will be at 9 o'clock Thursday morning, .v u The three prisoners, one man a Jim a former army sergeant, were arraigned on charges of espionage U. S. Attorney Lamar Hardy said action by a federal grand Jury would, be speeded, confirmed that other suspects were under surveillance and that more arrests were expected. Reed Velterli, chief of the Fed- Bureal of Investigation in New York, said coded messages decipher- ed by his staff revealed sale of U. S, army secrets concerning the Pana- ma canal Sam's vital link between the Atlantic and Pa- cific air corps informa- tion on Mitchell Field, L. I., key fa sir formications in the metropoli- tan New York area. POWER UNNAMED G-man chieftain declined to jpeelfy the European "foreign powr er" he said was" Involved plot. He said, however, that one ot the men confessed bavins told highly confidential U. S. government Information to "persons claiming to represent a European power." The German girl, Johanna Hoff- man, 28, of Dres'den, Germany, a hair-dresser employed on the north German Lloyd liner Europa, was arrested by federal agents as left the ship when it docked in New York. "All three prisoners have ed to their part in the Hardy said. The men arrested were Gunther Gustave Rumrich, 27, former TJ. S. army sergeant, once stationed in tha Panama canal zone, and Erich Gla- ser, 28, a soldier stationed at Mitchell Field. 5 Crushed To Death In Train Mishap BURLINGTON, la., Feb. A speeding freight train plowed In- to the rear of a work train carry- ing about 300 Burlington shops em- ployes home from work late tojay, crushing five persons to death and seriously Injuring a sixth. The dead, M employes in ths West Burlington shops, were iden- tified as: David Neder, Walt Whit- ford, Olto Langer and William Koch. One man was unidentified. Al Lang suffered crushed arma and legs and was reported in serious condition tonight. Less sor- lously Injured, but also confined to hospitals, were L. B. vitiiman and P. D. Kerr. Scores of other passengers on eight-car work train jumped to safety. Railroad employes and city fire- men continued working tonight to clear the wreckaage. Coroner Chris ArJank said they were searching' lor the bodies of two negro employes reported in the splintered wreckage; of the two wooden coaches. Jaw Broken O. F. Fite of Moran received med- ical attention last night at the Hcndrlck Memorial hospital for a fractured Jaw received in an acci- dent on an oil rig near Albany. Several teeth were also knocked out when an iron bar hit him. 119 was working for the Kittcry Oil The Weather ABILENE AM) ftoudy SvftdAy. TF.XAS: Partly Moderate OKt.AHOMA: Snndjv and Monday. NTW r.nly Vlorly Sunday and Monday; Wile In trmprrallre. VICINITY: rartlf arable on the V M. 41 m. yrstrrdav SS-iJ. el UmptrMnre HOVR I >0 MtdnlRM kmr't t.Miipfi 67-15: (Sine T. NC, 61 65 68 61 SI dale >rar jrifrm-. e.Sf, winrl-t ;M;   

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