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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: February 20, 1938 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - February 20, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               Ibttene VOL LVII, NO. 275. "WITHOUT. OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES. WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES "-Byron ABILENE, TEXAS. SUNDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 20, 1938. TWENTY-EK3HT PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS CltUi Long Marooned Soviets Taken From Ice Floe By EIOHAED 0. MABSOOK MOSCOW, Feb. sturdy icebreaking vessels smashed through a field of pack ice 10 feet deep today and res- cued four Russian icientists with their valuable records and equipment from a drifting ice floe camp off the eastern coast of Greenland. The rescue, just two days short of nine months after the four men were established a dozen miles from the North Pole, ended a unique odystey in which they voyaged over more than miles of arctic seas on a raft of ice. 3 MILES OF ICE The icebreakers Taimyr and Mur- man battered their way through three miles of jammed ice and ufckcct up Ivan Papanin, 45, chief of Ihe camp, and his three col- Fedcroff, 28, as- tronomer, Peter Ehlrsholf, 34, ma- rine biologist, and Ernest Krenkel, 34. their radio operator. The two vessels had reached striking distance only after days of maneuvering against shifting fields of ice and tricky arctic cur- rents. Along with the men and equip- ment, the rescue party was bringing back meteorological and hydro- graphic records compiled by the scientists in their hazardous vigil through the long arctic night- data to help the Soviet union in plans to establish regular trans- polar [lights from n-jsrla to the. United States. HELPLESSLY DRIFTED Tne campers had hoped to re- main near the pole for a- full year of scientific research but a shift ot their Icy camping ground dur- ing the polar summer launched them on their long voyage, power- less In the grip of arctic currents. Their home had been a ten by six-foot portable shack, fur-lined against the bitter cold. Their food was mostly concentrated, the meat of chickens and milk. Sau- sages Festooned the interior of their "home." Forgery Suspects Arrested At Waco WACO. C. "complaints were filed today against two suspects in forgeries in 17 Texas towns and two New Mexico towns, Two complaints charging forgers' and passing were filed against George DeLaney and one against Eddie Cooper. Towns where forgeries had been reported were Sweetwater, Graham, Tyler, Beaumont, Port Worth, East- land, Taylor, Austin, Jefferson, Vic- toria, Greenville, Vernon, Wichita Falls, Robstou-n, San Antonio. Cor- si'cana, Waco, find Roswell and Hobbs, N. M. Cold Loosens Grip On West Texas Cold weather was loosening Its grip last night on Central West Texas, but the mercury at mid- night again had dipped below freez- ing. The 12 o'clock reading was 31 degrees. Minimum temperatures for the two preceding nights were 27 degrees. It came after a day in which fruit men of this area charged near- ly half their crop olf the books as loss otter hard freezes Thursday and Friday nights. Hoping against hope, (hey awaited warmer weather to determine more definitely full extent of the damaje. Former Abilene Grocer Expires James A. Boyce Succumbs After 3 Weeks Illness James A. Boyce, 79, resident of West Texas for 54 years and a vet- eran pioneer retail grocerman, died about 7x30 o'clock at his home four -miles west of here on fJfKjttl. highway. Death came an Illness of about three weeks. After 35 'years as an Abilene grocer, Mr. Boyce re- tired several years ago and moved to his farm where he was living at the time of his death. Mr. Boyce was born October 1858 In Washington, Ark., and came to Texas in 1884. He made his home near Abilene and ever since that time has been a member and an elder in the Central Presbyterian church, here. Funeral will be Monday at 3 p. m. at the Central Presbyterian church. Other arrangements were plete last night. Brady Pioneers Die BRADY, Feb. fu- neral sen-Ices for Mr. and Mrs. John Q. McCulIoch coun- ty residents for 20 years, will be held here Sunday afternoon. Mr. 56, died Friday and Mrs 59, died today. Both had been 111 from pneumonia. EVENTS TO COME IN WEST TEXAS ASPERMONT.-Aspcrrnont Mclh- church will celebrate its lorueth nnnlvcrsary March 2 CROSS PLAIN'S.-ProJcct' show for Cross Plains FFA chapter will be held Saturday MERKEL.-MerkcI FFA livestock fhow has been Wednesday, Feb. 23. county will vie foi oney In their annua show Wednesday. "ensuring: club will sponsor Ihc Texas state A. rchool gym Febnmr 26. play, February 25, to help pay for Tiger band uniforms. COLOR nti Texas, A. F. and A. M.. PIONEER DIES 1. A. BOYCE incom- five children. The children are Ed ward Eoyce, Alycemaye Boyce, Pric Boyce. and Mrs. W. C. Mineus of Abilene, and Ward Boyce of Child- :ss. Also surviving are one brother George Boyce of Mcrkel, sis grand children and one great grandchild Search For Rodessa Tornado Dead Ends RODESSA, La., Feb. 19 -W_ Rescue crews abandoned the search for tornado victims tonight alter a long day's futile plodding of muddv lowlands. Weary national guardsmen, boy scouts and volunteers felt satisfied Uisters path and any additions to the list of 20 known dead would M come from hospitals quartering N the nearly two score injured. Red Riyer Overflows CLARKSVILLE, Feb. Damages estimated in the thou- sands of dollars were caused today when the Red river inundated many acres of rich farming land In the northern part of Rer River county. PRICE 5 CENTS Employes In Annual Session Mrs. J. M. Radford Main Speaker At 'Memory' Dinner Employes of the J. M. Radford 'down memory's lane1' last night with Mrs. J. M. Radford. She was introduced as the first clerk and bookkeeper of the firm at a, dinner which climaxed the annual meeting of Radford execu- tives, department heads and as- sistants, and branch house man- agers. Their wives joined the grocery house men for the dinner at the Hilton hotel, al which 104 pereons were served. Tables were banked with flowers, ijiiests besides em- ployes were representatives of va- rious brokerage and jobbing houses RADFORD TOASTMASTER Omar E. Radford, preeident a the wholesale firm and son of founder, was toastmasler. There was only one address, the shor talk of Mrs. Radford. Remainder of the program was devoted to in. troductlcn of guests. Each was presented In a two or three-sentence sketch In which Radford traced hfs acquaintance with tho individual. Some dated back to 1EOO. Mrs. Radford, affectionately call- ed "Aunt Bessie" by her son, pic- tured Abilene life and business in the earliest days. She recounted how today's huge organization had developed from a retail store es- tablishment in small that pans and tubs and even meat were hung from the celling. 'OLDEST- EMPLOYE The "first and oldest" employe now chairman of the Radford boah! of direclors, told dinner guests thai she came to Abilene In 1886. Her husband's stcVe was at First and Oak streels, on the same propovtv its Abilene house occupies today. J. M. Radford's store, she re- lated, was opened with a stock valued at between and From a 10-cent counter down its middle, Mrs. Radford said she selected the household British Cabinet Break Imminent iden Threatens here... At the end of the first year's business, the store showed t pro- fit of Mrs. Radford stul treasures some of the firm's books for the early years BEGINS WHOLESALE A few years 'later Radford en tered the whoiesale business. Afte three year's drouth, Mrs. Radforu said, the wholesale house was "car- West times HULL ASSAILS ENEMIES OF TRADE AGREEMENTS POLICY Forgers Mild Monners To Hit At 'Barrage Of Sinister Propaganda' DFS MOINBS, Feb. of BUte Hull lulled out tonight at opponents of his trade agreement program. The usually soft-mannered, quiet-spoken member of the Roosevelt inf.t VL'QK in eovtnir'.' Wall street. She concluded with a tribute to .He is survived by his wire, and hls riilfrfron T remarks in later years- "i deal in boys. My ambition is to train boys. All of Radford's branch houses were represented for an annual conference, held throughout the day at the Grace hotel. The Weather "crxiir: rir dandy iw wiuuieers leJt Satisfied v J Snnday had thoroughly combed the RanM Vf iMMpfn r. M. tl 11 n OF First Contribution Made Toward Fund To Purchase New Abilene High Band Unitorms There was yesterday in Ihe until Eagle band uniforms fund. It was the first contribution to- lv WBS llle msl coniriouuon 10 clllb ward more which Abl need the fri-state band festival here The donation was nude by W. ii K. i iu H n. me oonauou was nude oy w. In the A. Bynii.n. father ol R. T. Bynum, hand director, nt Its receipt The commllteemen met in Ihe home of Mrs. C. C. Slcwnrt, vral- cf denl of lllc 0th" organ- county 4- H and FFA clubs will hold their an- Chiane, Ihe former E ud DeMvTof Mrs L D Chrane Weed, died Friday night at Big Spring. She was to have played the (eminlne Itaci in the play, which was to have been presented by the Home Builders class of Ihe South Side Baptist church. Another benefit performance will be Ihe concert to be played by the school bandsmen in their own behalf, u wln ln Mid-March, the date yet lo be AnnouncM. Fulhcr msnns or raising (unds will be discussed at n Tuesday night mtellng of Ihc band par- ents association. It will be held In the hlfh school library One speaker will be Mrs. Morgan Jones, who will recount how many times in recent years the band has been asked to appear at Various civic functions and on goodwill tours Not onlj parents of high school bandsmen btit Ihosc of elementary school members is well have cabinet was emphatic in "You and the rest of our people have been subjected to a veritable barrage of sinister propaganda designed, for narrow and selfish reasons, to wreck the most Important policy---------------------------------------------- which our country can pursue to ACC Opens Bible Lectures Today Houston Minister Will Lounch list- Annual Progam Twenty-first annual Bible lecture- ship at Abilene Christian college will begin today with a lecture II o'clock by A. Dewitt Chaddlck of Houston, who will speak on subject, "Jesus of Nazareth, God's Gift to Humanity." The general theme of the pro- gram of lectures, which yearly it- tracts hundreds of members of the Church of Christ from many parts of the United States, is "Jesus of Nazareth, the Christ, the Son ol the Living This evening al Cecil E. Hill of Anson will speak on "Christ, Our Savior." WEEK LONG Lectures will be given throughout the week at 11 a. m., p. m. and p. m. with no lecture Monday afternoon. Round table discussions on "The Grace of Giving" will be conducted at o'clock Tuesday Wednesday, and Thursday mom- ings, and programs by the fine arts department of the college will be given Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday afternoons 3 o'clock. The A. C. C. Mother promote to economic well-being and peace." "DEFEAT OUR Speaking beiore the national farm Institute, he charged that: "111 their unholy zeal the. pro- pagandists have over reached themselves In the falsity of their assertions and have defeated thelr own efforts." Thrustins at opponents who charged he was In effect "selling the country down the ind was bringing unemployment .to labor and damage to Industry arid agriculture, the secretary of state said: V "To be violently atacked for steadfastly adhering to the one and only course of action which Is certain to remove the most dan- gerous obstruction that can be thrown In the parfof our export trade is an incredible bifot irony.': He warned farmers against at- tempts which he said were being marie "to mislead them Inte help- Ing1 predatory interests preserve their own privileged position under embargo the Injury of the farmers themselves and of the nation as a whole." Secretary Hull argued that his reciprocal agreements with other nations promote trade, trade pro- motes prosperity and prosperity promotes peace. He replied to the argument that trade agreements result merely in Increased imports without any cor- responding advantage tor exports, citing 1931 figures iliowing that imports, increased by" 000 State Not Ready To Try Pot Adams Case District Attorney Bob Black saJd last night that the state would be unable to try Pat Adams, charged with rape, when it is called in 43d district court Monday morning. Black said the complaining wit- school to tetum to Trial of Adams has continu- ed until Monday from February 9, Milburn S. Long. Black at that lime moved for continuance because of absence of the complainant. A venire of 125 men has been summoned for the trial. Dental Society Officers Reefected Regular quarterly meeting of the nth congressional district dental society was held last night at the Woolen hotel with the president, Dr. M. T. Ramsey, in charge. All present officers of Ihe society were re-elected for the remainder of 1938. They are Dr. Ramsey, president; Dr. J. J. Reese, secre- tary-treasurer and Dr. A. J. Wlm- berly of Sweetwater, vice-president. Rural Schools Vote To Consolidate EULA, Feb. of Eula and Enterprise school districts voted today to consolidate their schools. In Eula district the vote was 50 for and none against consolidation while Enterprise voted 23 for and 28 against the combination. Enterprise, a two-teacher school will be absorbed by Eiila, effective probably at the beginning of the next school term. Iron Lung Fund Surplus Pays For Baby Incubator Check for M51.65 was drawn yes- terday on the Iron Lunj fund' to pay for the new baby Incubator and oxyscn therapy unit Jiut installed at Hendrick Memorial hospital. equ costing and for freight charges ol J6.S5. tor, like the respirator, alll IK kept treatment. club is scheduled to toet.Thursdiv afternoon at 2 y. 'm., nual meeting of the.board of truss tees of .the college will be lit S p. m; Wednesday. THE PROGRAM The program for the lectureship Is as follows: Sunday, 11 a. of Naia- reth, God's Gift to Dewitt Sunday, p. Our E. Monday, 11 a. The Fulfillment of J Spring. Monday, p. Virgin Birth of the Wallace Tuesday, li a. Sonshlp of Jesm P. Antonio. Tuesday, p. Teacher Come from Saba. Tuesday, p. Mind of M. Wednesday, 11 a. the Manifestation of God In the Flesh Worth. Wednesday, p. Sin- less Life of W. Crane. Wednesday, p. Evidences o( Jesus as Uie Charles H. Thursday, 11 a. Proof that Jesus Is the C. Mor- Thursday, p. In comparable D. Bills Waco. Thursday, p. In the Heart of the H. Etherldge Friday, a. Resur- rection of the T Angelo. Friday, p. Chris Today, Our High Priest and Medi C. 'Wild West' Train Robbers Sentenced LAS CSUCES, N. M., Feb. 19.- Lorcnz, 22, and Harr. Dwyer, 27. were given prison terms o! 50 to 75 years by District Judge Numa Frenger today their pleas of guilty to second grce murder tor the train robbery death of W. L. Smith, Fi Paso Tex., switchman. HEIUHERR HITLER SPEAKS Eyes and ears of an anxious world turn to Germany today, where Adolf Hitler will deliver his much-publicized address to the Reichstag. His declarations are expected to eo far toward defining more clearly his in- tentions in centra) Europe. TENSE WORLD AWAITS HITLER'S Weighty Words Of Der Fuehrer May Fix Courses Of Many Chancelleries By LOUIS P. Ad FE tonight set'a brilliant stage for Adolf Hitler's announcement to a tensely listening world of the nex steps to bring all German-speaking peoples into the NS orbit? The third Reich made the most elaborate preparations of Its hls- j.tory so all .Germany and as much of the world .as willing could listen tomorrow to Hitler's closely-guard ed speech.to the Reichstag. MUCH SPECULATION- Will he 'demand again fultillmen of "dranj nach to the his book "Mein Kanipf" .forsees? Will he emphasize anew Ger many's demand for colonies or wll he hint at economic penetration o: the entire Danubian basin as thi way out of Germany's problems o: over-population and a dearth o raw materials? The answer to inese and othe critical questions was the subjec of endless speculation in the Chan celleries of Europe. Military circles looked to Hltle to declare the Reich would tak over the entire German armatnen industry, but no official conflrma tion was forthcoming. Thus evei the famous Knipp works woul t of the gravest moments In Europe'! post-war history. Hitler's heralded speech tomor- row, It was believed, would have ft vital bearing on this aspect of crisis, possibly inducing the cabi- net to submerge its differences fop a solid front. Henry Long Dies PORT STOCKTON, Feb. (iPh-Funeral services for Henry M. Long, religious, civic and business leader of West Texas for nearly three decades, were planned hero for tomorrow afternoon. Wheat Insurance Fund Is Set Up Available For Use. WASHINGTON, Feb. Sccreeteary Wallace created today a federal crop insur- ance corporation to offer wheat growers Insurance against losses from droughts, floods, hailstorms, insects and other natural causes. Acting under the new farm lair, he named as directors of the cor- poration M. L. Wilson, undersecre- tary of agriculture; Jesse W. assistant administrator of the agri- cultural adjuslment administration: and R. M. Evans, assistant to the secretary of agriculture. The Insurance to be offered grow, ers In more than 1.300 wheat coun- ties on their 1839 crop will con- stitute the first attempt of government to protect farmer! against losses from crop failure! caused by factors beyond theli control. Under the new farm law, grow- ers taking out insurance will rmj their premiums In wheat, or cash equivalent. Each farm will given a premium rate In terms ot bushels of grain rather than in dol- lirs, based on the production re- cord ef farm and county.   

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