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Abilene Reporter News: Monday, January 31, 1938 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - January 31, 1938, Abilene, Texas                               "WITHOUT, OR WITH OFFENSE-TO FRIENDS OR FOES, W E SKETCH YOUR WORLDdEXACTLY AS IT VOL LVH, NO 255 ABILENE, TEXAS, MONDAY EVENING, JANUARY PASES. PRICE 5 CENTS Court Upholds NLRB's Right For Hearings U. S. Districts Courts Without Power To Enjoin Sessions, Opinion Asserts WASHINGTON, Jan. supreme court up- the right of national labor relations board to conduct hearings to determine whether companies subject to the Wagner labor relations act had engaged in unfair labor practices. Justice Brandeis delivered the opinion in two cases involv- ing the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Ltd., and the Newport News and Dry Dock company. He announced no dissent. .BRANDEIS' OPINION Brandeis said the court was of the opinion the federal district courts were "without power to enjoin the board from holding the hearings." district Brandeis .said, "is without jurisdiction to en- join hearings because the" power to prevent any person .from engaging In any unfair practice affecting commerce, .has been vested by con- gress in the board and :the circuit court appeals and congress has declared: This power shall be ex- clusive; and shall not be'-affected by any other .means of adjustment or.preyeritian that haVbeen or may be by agreement, code, law; or otherwise.' grant of that exclusive pow- er is constitutional, because the act provided for- appropriate procedure before1 the board and! in the review by the circuit-court of appeals and adequate opportunity to secure Judi- cial protection .against possible action" on. the part, of the The Bethlehem Corporation had contended it .was not subject to "the Wagner labor lawTinder which pro- ceedings were brought, because ;it was not engaged'in merce. The NeTvport News company made simitar .plea, arguing no'labor dispute- existed and Its business did not "directly, or substantially affect interstate commerce." Reed Takes Seat On High Court Bench induction Gives Liberal Justices Clear Majority U. S. Accepts Jap Apology In Slopping WASHINGTON, The United. States accepted today espressaons of regret for the slapping .last at Nan- Jong, of John third: secretary in charge of "enbassy there, by a Japanese senfecrJc The -state departaefiCvmaJdng this announcement, made public a report from Allison which said the Japanese planned to court martial the commanding officer and 20 men of the unit involved in" the inci- dent. Investigate Death -ItlTTLEFIZLD, .Jan. Justice- of the Peace M. W. Brewer today conducted an investigatioa into the death in tourist camp of Alvjn Elliott, 25, of Levelland, LocaiC Of C Seeks Program Suggestions Lorge Turnout Seen For Feast A renewed appeal was being made by officers of the Abilene chamber of commerce for sugges- tions for the chamber's 1938 pro- gram and methods by which the usefulness of the organization could be increased, Questionaires on the program pol- icy of the chamber were sent to all members.last week and Malcolm .Meek, president, this morning urged that the forms" be filled in and re- turned. Duplicate or additional forms are available at the chamber of com- merce office. According to present indications, annual membership banquet of the chamber of commerce February 8, wfll be the best attended such meetings in many years, in the opinion of H. D. Austin, chairman of the arrangement scommittee. The Weather msd vicinity: Fair aad sot Quite so cold tonight: Tuesday partly cloudy -with slowly rising temperature. West Texas: Partly cloudy, not so cold IB north and west portions tonight; Tuesday partly cloudy, rising temperature. East Texas: Fair, not so cold in northwest portion, colder in south aad ex- treme east portions with frost, hard freeze in interior, temperature- fifteen to twenty- four In south portion except twenty-six to thirtv-two on coast and thirty to thiry-six in Rio Graadte valley; Tuesday, partly cloudy with slowly rising temperature ex- cept in extreme east portions. Highest temperature yesterday ....33' Lowest temperature this movnlaic -.17 TEMPERATURES Mon. 21 20 19 IS IS 17 IT ,17 IS 22 22 Noon" SJ Sunrise -unset 7 p.m, 7 p.m. Dry Wet Uitrtnoawtr- FAIR A fall from the -sixth .story window of a Washington, D. C, hotel ended the-career of Rep- resentative. Edward ,Al Kenney, above, New Jersey Democrat, sponsor of a -national .lottery' to iaise funds for! payment of the -bonus. He had. attended a. party of New Jersey leaders 'shortly before he met his death. Senate Shelves Anti Lynch Bill WASHINGTON, Jan. Stanley Porman Reed isas sworn today as associate justice of 'the United States supreme court. Eis assumption of seat on high bench shifts control of the tribunal to a. liberal bloc of five justices. Reed, President Roosevelt's sec- ond appointee to the court, swore the jurist's oath before Ms judicial colleagues in the quiet dignity of the supreme court chamber. The oath was administered, by -Charles Emore Cropley, supreme court clerk. Reed took Ms seat on. the bench at -the ex- treme left of Chief Justice Charles Evans" -Hughes. CAKDOZO'S CHAJB VACANT Nest to Reed's seat was the .va- cant chair of Justice Benjamin N. Cardozo, who -With Justices Louis D. Brendeis, Harian F. Stone and Hugo L. Black -comprises the liberal- block which Reed's appointment aug- mentedi to a .five-man majority. Cardbzo is ill Cardozo's illness is a possible por- tent of another change; m member-ship. Many persons close to the court believe the .ailing jurist may .resign his. post, thus giving Mr. Roosevelt "a .third to the bench. 'J Jteed assumed his place noon before a chamber in which- every seat was filled. Bis associates of the justice, Reed" resigtiftd as of -tie TJnited States to accept tiie court appoint- present in full headed by Attorney General Homer S. "Cummtngs.. .'Reed entered -the court -chamber with the -Other justices of -the court and .went -immediately to 'the deifc of Cropley, There he raised hand swore, to oath. re- quired of all judges of IT. S. courts! its Arises Over Wages In. Housing Debate .WASHINGTON, Jan. .The senate dropped the filibuster against the biH' temporarfly today to consider the administration's housing- legis- lation. Despite- general" approval 'of ob- jectives., of the housing tors disagreed over its. wage pro- visions. _ The bill, as originally passed by the requires .payment" 'of "prevailing wages" fixed by the la- bor department on government-in- sured construction projects. .This section was removed by commit- tee appointed to reconcile house and-senate measures. Senator Lodge author of the, prevailing wage amendment, led an attempt to reinstate it. The house-has approved the com- promise bill, designed to hasten the flow of private capital into home construction. It would cut the down-payment on low-cost houses to -ten percent and would reduce interest and service charges on gov- ernment-insured projects. Consideration of the housing bill gave southern senators a rest from their orations against the anti- lynching measure, which neverthe- less remained the unfinished busi- ness -of the senate. Naval and other appropriations bills are awaiting senate action, as is the administration's government reorganization measure.- Would Bolt League MIAMI, Jan. pro- posal from President William Green, that the American Federa- tion of Labor withdraw from la- bor's nonpartisan leage, put a- new question before the federation's executive council today. Recover Of Mail Pouch Loot Recovery of f of stol- en from a railway mafl pouch in .West Texas last .November was anr nouncisd -today by -Postal- Inspector P. Lv-Clampitt.. a Jarge part -money _ was iouna in the of -i suspect's home. .Six persons now are in custody in con-" necMon with theft The -money stolen was consigned from the Dal- las Federal Reserve, bank "to the first National bank at 'O'DphneH. The mail pouch- was 'missed 'at Tahoka while "being transported: by train .from. Slaton to O'Donnell on the South Plains. Construction At State Hospital Hits Stride DormitoryTd Be Finished July 1 Construction work at the Abilene state hospital was getting in full swing this morning as' the last of the projects was started.. Work on the dormitory building was started last week and is to be completed in 160 working days or approxi- mately by July 1. The store room addition, beauty parlor, and phy- sicians' residence .are to be finished within 60 working days. Dr. .T, B. superintendent of the institution expressed himself this- morning as being, very -veil pleased with- the progress being made on the -work. He also stated that he felt the new -buildings would add .much to' the" and efficiency of the hospital.' Dunlap and Coughran are con- tractors for the while McAlister and .Tucker have the other building contracts. Both are Abilene firms. The plumbing is to be installed by A. P. Kascb of Big Spring. Expenditure for the im- provements will total OFFICIALS SILENT ON OUTBREAKS-- Mexican Troops, Fascists Clash WINTER'S WHITE Digging out in sub-zero weather after the century's worst-snowstorm proyed.a Bering task in Michigan's. bu-[ ried'. upper' peninsula, as this re-; maskable photo of Main.street shows..-Leaving: Jbe- hind death, isolated communities, .stranded miners and school children, the 150- inch snowfall piled drifts 25 feet deep Jn places. Ironwood; battled 12-foot drifts downtown. Bodies Found Watch On Vultee's FLAGSTAFF, Ariz., Jan. burnedr bodies: _oL Gerard P. aeronautical and his brpught; to Flagstaff: snow- cpyrapi" Wilson; their flaming plane ;fell-Saturday. Twelve; men of more than 100 who set-out reached the ship after strug- gling; for hours through deep snow, Sh'eriff ArthurVandevier xeported. Members of ".the" party .said, the bodies .were so .badly "burned that they were idenfified. only through a wrist watch The -small' monoplane plunged. to 'in flames as Vultee to pass through a bunding snow'storm while en route to Ms home in Calif. only things we found around .there that we could recognize were part of a woman's shoe and. a man's said Edward L. Robinson, CCC youth and one of three persons who fought their way ahead' of .the posse ently caught fire in the air and.was and located the wreckage, Robinson said the plane appar- aa inferno as it plunged to the ground. and his wife ap-" peared to have been locked in. the cabin as it burned from around them. Cold Weather Slows Payment Of Taxes -Cold weather Monday morning apparently had slowed. city. ;and county tax payments, at least both city and county collectors report- ed at noon that payments' during the. morning, had'been only slight- ly heavier than during the past week.. .Both .offices, open until midnight "if the demand war- rants'. At noon, today and had paid -their poll taxes, Xotal payments -are expected to be nearly WINM BLAST SETS SEASONAL LOW OF 17 DEGREES FOfc CITY Frigid Wjnds Drive Deep Into Texas; Rising Forecast Wintry westher marched through Texas to the tea today, kicking' up a storm in. the gulf of Mexico and leaving behind the year V sevemt temptrattires: Freezing weather extended deep 'into South Texas, touching Houston with 38 degrees but missing the Eio Grande valley, as usual, by several degrees. PREVIOUS HIGff 22 The "cold .wave brought Abilene 17 degrees, the "season's lowest tem- perature. Previous winter mTnimums were 22 degrees- on Nov. '20 and 21 Dec.. 9. However, the frigid Fighting Rages Near U.S. Line Reports Indicate Clashes Limited To Four Cities In State Of Tamaulipas MATAMORAS, Jan. hetwwn federal soldiers and "rebel" hands, identified hy the Matamoras chief as Los Dorados, Mexican fascist organization, broke out today in four cities of the state of Tamaulipas. Center of the fighting was reported to he the village of Ramirez, approximately. 20 miles from the -United States bor- der, and 25 miles south of Mercedes, Tex. Unconfirmed reports said that a desperate struggle was underway for possession of the town. Eighteen men reportedly had "been lolled in fighting. Reports from other border pqints indicated that the fight- ing was local It had not spread to the states of Uuevo Leon, Coahuila and Chihuahua, which are separated from Tex- as by the Rio Grande river. BATTLE ARMED BANDS Gen. Gabriel P. Cervera., com- mander of the Matamoras army, post, said that police, troops and agrarian reservists had.met "armed NETHERLANDS CELEBRATES-------- Heir To Orange Throne Giv es Birth To Daughter on snap here is not expected to be of duration that would cause damage to >water pipes or other similar cas- ualties. Tonight is. to be fair and not quite so cold; Tuesday, ;partly cloudy with slowly rising tempera- tures. STORM WARNINGS ISSUED In the panhandle temperatures dropped as low ,as degrees. Some north Texas Teadings were: Wichita Falls 14, lowest since. Jan. 23, 1937; Borger ;12; Amarffic 11, three points above yesterday's record season low of. 8 degrees; Lubbock- -10 degrees and rising; San Angelo 19, coldest of the year. .The New Orleans weather bu- reau announced .storm warnings from Pensacola, to Browns- ville, advising coast points that freezing weather was. advancing behing a. low pressure area; out of the RoclOr-" mountains. Dallas shivered in the coldest weather, of the 18.8. Other readings: Denton- 16; season's low; Paris 17; Palestine Tyler 20, which meant- 45-degree drop since Sunray noon; Corsicana 20, season's low; Austin 24, seasonal low; McAUen, 40 and no damage to valley cjjrus and vegetables Cor- pus Christi ,36 and warming up. Corpus Christi source reported freezing temperatures went no: farther south than Beevffie, just below San Antonio. The Dallas weather bureau said no .-snow fell in' Texas during the night and that skies, generally were fair. Its forecast for to- night and tomorrow was for slightly higher temperatures bat still cold enough for extra, blank- ets.- SOBSTDYK, Netherlands, Jan. 31 Juliana, heir to the throne of the House of Orange, gave birth to a" girl today, her first chfld. The baby, provided there is no future male child, was destined to carry into the third generation the line of queens of this sturdy nation of people. With the pretty, pink cheeked princess in the semi-circular white palace here were her Queen Wilhelmina, whose heir she is, and her husband of year. Prince Bernhard, himself a. scion of the ancient German house of Lip- pe-Biersterfeld. Princess wanted girl; Prince Bernhard a boy. It was announced officially that the child was born at a. m. a. an. C5T> Tor weeks, nation and poi- JULIANA birth. When the official announce- ment 'was, flashed, waiting batteries of artillery and. cannon of warships at: sea, began firing salutes of 51 guns. -It -would have been 101 guns if the baby had been a. boy. People ran from homes and of- fices into the streets to ask whether the baby was a girl or boy and to begin a. celebration that, aided by national, holidays, -was expected to continue for days. Eight groups of medievally clad heralds, "two trumpeters and a crier in started out from the Hague to .inform, the country formaUr of the birth. Coincidently airplanes took off from royal air force fltlds to drop leaflets all over the country. Sextons climbed to church towtrs to ring Town and vfflafe bands were ordered out to head Choristers made JCUAKA, a Set Roosevelt-Clark Wedding June 18 BOSTON. Jan. Roosevelt, 21, youngest son of the president, and Miss Anne Lindsay Clark, 21, of Boston, will be married June 18, in the little Nahant Epis- copal church, according to Mrs. P. Haven Clark, the-prospective bride's mother. 11 Manager Reports Kidnap Attempt To.Local Police Police today were seeking a young man who early Sunday morning robbed the Humble service-station, 942 Pine" street, of in money, attempted to kidnap the manager, stole a pick-up truck and despite a collision with two automobiles at North Fourth and Cypress, managed to escape. Johnny BUlingsley, manager of the station, recounted to officers the night's events. He said he went to town for a cup of coffee, and that when he came bade "the man was 'sititing in a pick-up truck which belongs-to the station. Blllingsley said that when he went over to the car to force the man out, a gun was thrust in his direction, the intruder going" inside and scooping up the money. BUlingsley said that he was then forced into a "car and told to drive hijacker getting into the pick-up truck and following. At Cypress and North Fourth, the .-pick-up swerved around the comer too.fast; it ran into two automo- biles, the front wheels climbing on top of one. of themachines. bands" in a number of skirmishes in this vicinity this morning. Four men were killed and m quantity of arms and ammunition inirtiwo; trucks were captured by thetrocip6> No cause for the outbreakscotifif be determined immediately. Anriy authorities were silent concerning the identity of the 4iarmed bands." Police Chief Miguil Cardenas, said that members of the "rebel" group which1 encountered soldiers: in the streets of Maiambros had been identified as members of Los Dorados, known also as the "Gold Shirts." Officials in several border cities were attempting to. locate Gen. Nicolas Eodignez, leader of the fas- cist organization, who is known to have been. operating during recent weeks in the Lower val- ley section of Texas. The .search for Bodifuez indicated _iiiat connected wiih the outbreaks. Looting Reported; By Texas Paper Jan. The-Mc- Allen 'Monitor today said it had an unconfirmed report 18 men were killed in a gun battle at Ramirez, small Mexican, town" 35 miles east of here. It said the fight reputedly took place early today but no light was thrown on the nature of the fight. The paper said it had reliable information that small bands of Mexicans had been- looting in the small Mexican Villages along the border for several, weeks. The poor condition of agriculture was cited See MEXICO, Pf. CoL 2 Pleads Guilty On 44th Drunk Count A man whose name was on. the police blotter for the 44th time for tine same offense pleaded guilty to drunkenness in corporation court this morning.. He and the judge came to an agreement by which he went out of the courtroom under a suspend- ed fine, promising T will stay sober until next January." It was his third appearance befre Judge E. M. Over- shiner, who uses'the suspended fine system in an effort to curb the habituals. The court assessed in other fines for .drunkenness. Case of a negro charged with drunkenness and disturbing the peace was pass- ed until 5 p. m. A: rmrry charged with assault, in connection with an affray with his wife and a woman bystander, was transferred to the justice of the peace court. FIVE DIE IN Taylor Adds 8 To State Traffic Toll Of For'Black Year' Taylor county added eight traffic deaths to the 1937 toil in Texas, rec- ords released today showing that the state's automobile deaths last year reached 2.043. In Abilene, five persons died as the result of traffic mishaps; three others lost their lives in the county. This is a reversal o' the average ov- er the state, most accidental deaths occuring on the highways rather than in the urban ereas- There were 710 accidents in cities, and 957 on highways, with 36 fa- talities resulting in the cities and 133 on the open highways, Abilene's roll of automobile deaths last year: J. L. (cop) Anthony, Feb- ruary 21; Mrs. J. L. Lindsay, March 24; James Gray Biedsoe, October 11; Mrs. Nora Street, October 19; Ray Jones, November 19. Deaths from accidents in the county: J. B. Toombes, Merkel, Jan- Count FDR Fete The state department of public uary 26: C.'D. Camp Jr., Merkel, i safety in its report called 1937 the March 17; Guy Kell Guffee, June 4. Lay Blast to Error ROME, Jan. offi- cial communique said today that the explosion Saturday in the pow- der plant at Segni was caused by a foreman who used an iron instead of copper 'chisel to open a clogged tube of compressed air, thus caus- "black year." Traffic deaths and in- juries reached the highest figure in the history of the state. In reviewing the picturersaf ety ex- perts pointed out that 897 of the had suffered their fatal injuries within city limits; and were killed on open highways. The re- maining 22 death locations were un- determined from the reports. Speed. state safety officials declared, was hlamftd for moet of the fatal crashes. bv Hat a typical month. Last year, accidents were reported to the state department. There were persons injured. Records show that pedestrians were struck down, 529. of them fetal- ly injured. Two of Abilene's five deaths were pedestrians. One youth was iflled while riding a motorcycle. In the county, there-was one pe- destrian death; two other persons were fatally hurt while automobile Gross Revenue More Than ChairmanSciYS County .executive committee of e celebration of .the. presidenfi bifthday .to meet at" 3. o'clock afternoon to make first complete check of :the revenue from. jfce held in" -Abilene Saturday, night. Malcolm Meek, chairman, of the committee said :that.already more fhan in- gross receiptsMiad been, accounted "for and ,wat to come in. A fun .report of tta ceipts and expenditures of the-; com- plete program will be issued torthe public at; Sir close of tfie. meeting: Members of the 
                            

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