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Abilene Morning Reporter News Newspaper Archive: March 7, 1937 - Page 1

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   Abilene Morning Reporter News (Newspaper) - March 7, 1937, Abilene, Texas                                ABILENE MORNING REPORTER-NEWS VOLUME ABILENE, TEXAS, SUNDAY HORNING, MARCH TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS PRICE 5 CENTS NUMBER 27 A discuulon ot evtnU ind jwr- In the newi, world md Pi.loiul, bj a group of CeirUu and Informed newspaper mm Washington and New York. mW pvbllihed u ntvi fYilurt. OpUltMi tiprriiH IbflM or coilrlbMllai relanin. ud cot to u reJkttlnc Iki (dltoriaJ pcMcj of IUi BY RAY TUCKEE WASHINGTON, March Political economists welcome (he 1937 wave of wage boosts, but wiser insiders are watching for an economic undertow In the form of acute price Inflation. Fairly Imme- diate result might be to scare buy- ers at the very moment when their dollars are vitally needed In the litest recovery push. -Higher wages In heavy Industry coal, au torn a tic P. lly bring a general lift In the price level. The increase, as al- ways, will gradually outstrip the ex- tra pay, and production will again exceed consumption. Follcs who have been stocking up on a rising market will economize. The tend- ency has already shown Itself In the consumers goods, which enjoyed a marked spurt on the im- petus of government spending. National planners are sitting up nights to devise checks and baltnc- es, but they haven't found the an- STEEL HIKES PAY FOR ITS SKILLED WORKERS BUTTLE Bee WHIRLIGIG, Ff. 3, Col. 1 Loralne School Head Reelected LORAT.NE. March E. Williams, graduate of McMurry college with the class of 1929, has been elected superintendent of the Loralne schools for his second year. Previous to holding thuf position he was high school principal and cojch for six years. N'ewby Pratt was reelected high tchool principal. Also a graduate of McMurry, he will teach commercial subjects and coach football. Lomlne school has 22 affiliated credits, and Is asking credit In home economics, typing and general mathematics this year. There are scholastics. The Loralne PrTA will sponsor a womanless style' show March 18. the proceed! la be used In beauti- fying Ihe campus.' First Ballot Test Of Court Plan Set AUSTIN, March thusand Texans In tlie 10th congres slonal district may be the first to express themselves by ballot on President noosevelt's proposed sup- Sit-Downldeas Spread Even to Ir Bottom of Seas Bj DALE HARRISON NEW YORK, Mtrch "sit down and Uke a load olf your j feet" school of thought has spread at last to the bottom of the sea; nor was the Idea all wet, either. i'rom Egyptian monies to Jap- anese play girls, from shoemakers to deep sta divers, the rebellion ex- emplified by the squat has been taken up by virtually everybody. Monks In a Coptic monastery on Egyptian desert do not like heir abbot and they do not like to have Ihelr social life restricted; to onlght they continued to sit down n protest. Tony Dlno, dives Jor a living, vent down to the bottom of Lake Superior In hi! diving outfit, and sat down until the city of Port Ar- .hur, Ont, agreed to a higher wage. Bricklayers Sit Four Knoxvllle bricklayers ut down on a Job that was within five hours of being completed. They :on a total of 15 cents and had a three hour rett. Their four hod carriers >at down, too, for lack of anything else to do. All they got i'as the rest. The pretty little geisha girls to see whom tired American business men have been known to travel half way round the world, seemed suc- cessful tonight In their sit-down at Osaka, Japan. The ladles went Into pout a week ago because their bosses wouldn't let them organize a union. Tonight they were back with their smiles and their songs, with the police In charge of media- tion proceedings. Detroit's flve-and-ten cent store! girls were saying "May I help you. to customers, having sat themselves down to a wage boost settlement of th-lr difficulties with the F. W. Woolworth people. Thirty-four New York artists' models found sitting down almost as unpleasant as standing up for art classes, but they held doggedly to'-their strike for more money.'As neared, however, there were signs of weakening. Some of the girls remembered with fluttering hearts that they had Saturday night dates with the boy friends. Old rocking chair seemed, In- V reme court reorganization. The court plan has appeared a major Issue In a. special election called by Governor James V. Allret nor April 10 to choose a successor to the late Rep. J. P. Buchanan. Eight candidates planned cam- paign drives through the 10 coun. ties of the district. Workers From Aluminum Industry Bolt AFL To Join Lewis By The Associated fiat "Big steel" announced a wage In- crease for thousands of Its skilled and semi-skilled workmen Saturday while labor disputes tied up pro- duction In various other Idiislrlcs n scattered districts. Carnegie-Illinois steel corpora- .lon, the biggest subsidiary o! the U. S. Steel corporation, disclosed the new wake hike, a flat, 10 cents an hour, to be effective March 18. It said it would apply to the higher working classes hourly, tonnage and piecework would benefit aboul 93 percent of the company's employes. Earlier In the week the company announced a 10 cents an hour In- crease and a 40-hour week for com- mon Iab2r. CIO Kecrulli Meantime, competition for labor's leadership became more acute as a union In the aluminum Industry bolted the American Federation ol Labor, led by William Green, and swung Its allegiance to John L. Lewis' committee for Industrial or- ganization. It was a new gain for Lewis, whose position already had been strengthened during the week by recognition from ranking producers In the steel and electrical Indus- tries. BuL Green's forces were not Idle. Craft union leaders opposed to Lewis' "vertical" organization pro- gram Indicated they were consider- ing several melhcds o( reprisal. One was a boycott of capital goods pro- duced by CIO members. Another was refusal to recognize the label on ccnsumer go'Vs. The defection ol tne aluminum Workers union's largest unit, at new Kingston, Pa, plant of the Aluminum Company 01 America, LABOR, Fj. 12, Col. 6 'Ideal Chorine' Mlldred Rehn a Vien- nese flrl, haj Just what Is need- ed for tbe new standard] for screen rbanisea, Bars Dave Gould, Him dance director, who pick: her u Ihe ideal chorus flrl. Miss Rehn, goldrn blonde, li fire feel, sli. (Associated Prew photo.) ABILENE VOTES BOND ISSUE FOR RESERVOIR f--------------------------------_--- Davidson Slaps dfed, to have plenty on the ball. B. L. COX SLIGHTLY BETTER General condition of Ben L. Cox, Abilene attorney who entered Hen- drtck Memorial hospital Friday, was reported slightly Improved Saturday midnight by attendants. Mr. Cox was resting well. Allred Signs Bill For Liquor Search AUSTIN, March James V. Allred signed a bill today authorizing search and seizure war- rants to' enforce the slate liquor law. Because It received a two-thirds majority in the legislature Ihe sta- tute will be effective Immediately The governor had advocated a number of measures to tighten en- forcement and the court of criminal appeals recently stated absence of authorization for search warrants was hampering officials, especially In dry territory. TWENTY-NINE PLACES RESERVED FOR ABILENE BIRTHDAY PARTY SLATED FOR TOWN FOUNDERS Speaker GEORGE S. ANDERSON Tifenly-nlne places hive been re- served for the 56th birthday party of Abilene, at which men and women who came to the city prior to December 31, 1883, will be hon- ored. The observance will begin at p. m.. Monday, March 15. It will be held at the Hilton hotel. The acceptance coupon Is printed again this morning and all those qualifying are again InvlLcd to fill It, send the acceptance to the Re- porter-News, with a picture or the sender and a brief sketch of early- day experiences and autobiography. Seven new places were reserved yesterday. The following accepted the Invitation: Mrs. R, G. Anderson, 17H itrcel. December, 1MO. T. W. McCormlck, TuscoU, October. 1581. C. E. Fulwiler. 311 Elm, Jinn- arr II, 1SS2. Pcle Svcarlngen, Fine llreel, July. 1UO. Mri. Sue 9M Mul- berry, fall of 1SII. Mrs. j. G. Barker, IOC Beach, nmmcr ot 1811. Founders Birthday Party Coupon Editor, Reporter-News, Abilene, Texas I sccept Ihe invitation of the Abilene Reporter-News to be a guest at party celebrating the city'i fifly-siith birth- day, March 16. My Name Ky Address I came lo Enclosed is a sketch of my life, and n photograph. Liquor Board Supervisor Says Dispensers In Dry Areas 'Out' Texas' liqucr control board w lenceforth seek to close what John district supervisor stationed nere, termed "dispensers of beer to the public, operating uftdcr the name "Two counties in this district may vole on local option sale Coates. A number of persons In these counties have asked me whai the attitude or the liquor boart would be If their counties voted dry and they organized these 'clubs', have told them the lype of busi- nesses they described are Illegal ar.d that, with aslstar.ce of the sheriffs and county attorneys, we'n going to see that these places an closed." If a county votes dry I bellevi In keeping It dry in respect to tlv wishes of the people." he added. are some such places In Abilene, which may expect to be In vcstlgated." said Ccates. Callahan Jurors Return 14 Bill! I Burke Blasts At Appeal Made By FD; Flanagan j Replies In Defense As 'Chat1 Planned i WASHINGTON, March Democratic opponents of President Roosevelt's court bill opened tonight ;sn extensive barrage designed to I rounteract durlnj the next vreek ihe chief executive's appeals for the ration's support in reshaping the ;.supreme court. I Senator Burke (D-Neb) opened fire with a radio speech asserting that "no greater disservice was ever done io the cause of democracy lan miy well result from the dlll- ent and surpassingly cunning ar.d ecepllve program to discredit the upreme court In the rnlndi of the Jbllc." On the other hand, Representa- ve Flanagan In a speech rglng support of Mr. Roosevelt's roposal, said: "You cannot destroy the national onsclence of a Judicial flat. This as attempted by a divided court In he Dred Scott case. You knov the esull. "The people overruled a supreme court decision by force of arms. Put Experience "With this experience of the >ast, like a red light flashing Its warning, shall we again permll our or five Judges, who are out of olnt wllh our social and economic roivth, to again embroil us in Earlier In the day, Chairman Copeland (D-NY) of the senate ommerce committee, replied In i tatement to the president's sugges Ion that the supreme court ha< ast doubt over the constitution- ally of flood control legislation. Paraphrasing the president's O words, Copeland said that "when veatlng men, piling sandbags the at Cairo find time lo tudy this question" they Till hat failure to provide for flood ontrol was "not the fault of the upreme court" but of "the presl Mrs. M. E. Boai, 417 March 15, IMJ. Speaker at the dinner for the "first" citizens of Abilene will be George S. Anderson. The first time he saw Abilene was December 21. 1885. As a small boy he arrived here with his father Rnd brother, former home enroutt In Bell from their county lo Roby. where the elder Anderson was to Join In organizing Fisher county, snd found tht town o! Roby. Chrlslmas Shopping "We had been on Ihe road two weeks when we got .Mr An- derson related. "My father bought our Christmas things here from a grocer whose store was next to the Palace hotel. The old court house, that was demolished lo make way for the present one. was new and It was really a beautiful building. Abilene was a flourishing town of George Anderson returned lo Abilene several limes a year unul December 27. when he moved here to stay. In Roby J.ldge R. C. Crane, now of had es- tablished the first newspaper In Fisher Fisher County Call. He hired younc Anderson as "printer's doll." By W he had learned the printer's trade, and See PAFTV. PI. It. Col. 5 Rains Are Help To West Texas Ranges BA1RD, March teen felony and three mlsdemeano Indictments were returned by a 42nd district court grand Jury In a re port returned late FYlday. All excep one defendant is In custody, Sherlf R. L. Edwards reported. Bills returned indicted: DaleGai on two charges of forgery by lion; Joe Brooks for cattle iheft Ed Marchman. Wesley Rust, R. H Taylor and M. B. Moon of thef1- ove 550; Earl R. Stewart, driving while Intoxicated; A. E. Henderson. Wil- liam Price and William burglary; o. W. Kllrr.an, robbery; W. D. Cammon. tl-.ell by biilee: W- C. Monzlngo and A. E. Henderson, misdemeanor theft; and Gene Goode, aggravated lent'g own agent, the director o he budget." More Good Cotton Seed Is Oflered Two more p'aces where irr.proved cotlon seed may be obtained lor planting purposes filed Ihf They are: J. Walter Tye. P. G. Sell. Tuscola. The Reporter-Sew will publish the nBtnes and addresses or indi- viduals, firms. Including Kir.r.ers Kibitzer Peeks On Beauty Am Beast, Tells Al "GooiT Bill McKlnxicy, WlchU Palls, and alluringly beautiful Bllll GambUl. Abilene, who "dated" las night with all expenses paid winners of Ihe publicized Beaut and Beast contest sponsored by th Brand, HRrdln-Simmons unlversll school paper, had an official klb Itzer, a reporter. He was In the chauffeur-drive Pontlac car and flde-by-slde wit the winners In the Hilton coffe shop, but at the Paramount theate the midnight snacfc at the hotel and the sentimental afterwards, he dWn't rea sons explainable later. As the car picked up Ugly Me Klnney at the dormitory, you Peeping Tom was amazed to see Jimmy Durante nostril slicking fair city block over a luxedo-cia chest. Hustling up and by dent persuasion that he know 1 possessed, your reporter managed front seat In the automobile. Th when he received the first dirt look. Bat he was more than amazi when Miss Gamblll walked out. .he car, he was flabbergasted. Dressed in perfect fitting gold gown with a red corsage and a cape ;hrown over her shoulder, she .ooked too good for 1.000 good- .ooklng men. leL alone one little wast. As she entered she spoke nicely lo your quivering writer (the first and lul time of the evening) and he collapsed. Sirens awoke him as llw left the campus led by a cycle escort. The s-nined down Hickory stree: to North lo Pint. While enrouLe your thick-skinned reporter listen- ed and learned that the beauty had been nervous all day and now cotton oil mill operators and i offering lor to farmers reliable, '.well-tested ptanMr.g jcrd to replace j .sorry seed, i This Is being done lo ao el-r.Ue the n-.ovenr.pr.t for bettenr.en; o'. grade and staple or Wrs' Ion that Is grovEn; 5n rogton. Rains varying- from a lo two fnrhrs fell over A larpe part of TPXSS early SatMrcHiy. 4-H l3 Stolen; S10 Reward Shofl'frs brought loUi! prp- cipllatlon In Abilrnc 5ir.ce morning to .75 inch, hji: Inch lalllns yesterday. PortcftsL for S'.mtisy is proiMb'.f local slunrrrs. Points recclvin; Accused Dentist A look On hit 'iff. Dr. K. G. Miller a ahown after he wis formally charted with the murder bjr hloroform ol li-jtar-old tleo Sprouve it CharlottsTllle, Police quoted the mlddle-aied lljt ai confesiJni he idmin- ilerid the. chloroform u be prepared to perform in lllfjil eperaflon In a car sli miles oul- jlde the Mj. (A'socbtnl Press photo.) Heaviest Terms 1_UI1LLUI In Dope Trials 11 I'll! Mayor 'Gratified' With Results Although But Small Majority DALLAS, March jdge T. WhlifleM Davidson levied the heaviest narcotic law vio- lation sentence on record against !a stunned dope years In Voters of Abilene yesterday or- 'he Leavenworth, Kas.. prison. TIKES Hi Takes All First Places For First Time Since Tourney .Started -Abilene High' school wepl -.-all list places in Its own Invitation tournament Saturday for the irst time slocg the event was inau- gurated five years ago. The Abilene boys "A" debate team, composed of Sammy WaJd- rop and mil Tele, defeated Breci- high school la the finals; he girls "A" team, Lucille Winter and Eleanor Bishop, won over Van, and Gaston CogdeU and Betty Sue Pitts won high honors rn boys', and girls' eitemporaneous speaking, res- ectlvely. Waldrop and Tele, debating the negative side of the question, "Re- solved, that the manufacture of munitions of wax should be a gov- ernment took a. 6-1 judges' decision from the Brecken ridge team, Ben J. Dean, Jr., and Beat Dean. The girls were given 5-2 decision over their opponents, LaVeta Harris and Kalhryn Ro- bertson. The Abilene girls had the negative side of the question. Winners Extemporaneous speech winners and their subjects, were: boys' divi- sion: Gaston Cogdell, 'The Spanish War Non-Intervention net." first place: W. C. Esles, Lubbock. "What Is Wrong with the Present Farm See AHS, PI. 12, Col. 4 dered I6CO.OOO In bonds Issued to finance the Port Phantom Hill water reservoir project. The majority favoring the bonds was, however, very 150. Complete returns showed: On the North Side, nt the Cedar street station, 426 votes were polled for the Issue. 312 against, for a majority of 1H. On the South Side, at the But- ternut station, 475 votes were polled the Issue, 439 against, for a majority of 3a. The city-wide count was: POT the bonds .................901 Against .......................1S1 A total of ballots was cut. The election climaxed a cam- paign that lagged greatly until two weeks ago. The Issue was submitted by a majority of the city commission with those favoring a vote at this time led by Mayor C. L. Johnson. Statement Last night, the mayor made this statement: "It should go without saying that I am gratified at the result of this election, In which the people of Abilene have again shown their de sire to go forward.. "I am sllll here to prove that the cost figures which I submitted on this project are conservative and accurate. I feel certain that the Phantom Hill project can be com- pleted for 1600.000 with a capacity of supplying gallons ol ler a day. As brought forward by the city commission, the project called for the sale of only n bonds at this time for the con- struction of the reservoir, with pipe me, filtration plant and pump sta- !on to come later, when the neec arrives. Louis Ginsberg. 53, jUggejed when Judge Davidson assessed record-breaking sentence and a 10 fine as the climax to a. sensa- .nnal trial that bared the workings a narcotics ring federal agents iscrlbed as the largest In the JUthwest. J. J. Biggins, jopervlsor for the arcotlc bureau of Texas, Louisiana, :d Mississippi, said Ginsberg's sen- :nce eclipsed by 12 years the fcr- ler record penally assessed In the nlted States. Judge Davidson sentenced five .her defendants to terms ranging rom to 20 years as the group, aces grey and Incredulous, stood be- ore the bench. Led to a barred holdover In the ederal building, the defendants ung to the bars u though to keep rom falling. Defense attorneys Immediately led notice of appeal. Judge Davidson said he wu t heavy penalties primarily for the protection of and waa not closing the door of hope for ny of the defendants." He pointed ut that every prisoner becomes en- Itled to parole In time. Dallas Scarborough, the former so effectively' lea trie postlon. could not readied lac night for i. statement. He opposet he proposition both In the press uii }y radio, concluding campaign Friday evening with an address over station KHBC. The election wrote another chap- ter In Abllene's life-long battle for more water. Records of the munici- pality from Its first following sale of town lots In March 18S1, Bhov Bee BONDS, PI. It CoL 5 Cause 01 Airliner Crash Is Revealed SAN FRANCISCO. March tir lines officials announ- ced today thai an Investigation dis- closed a radio microphone lodged between the control column and scat rail and caused the crash of a Lcs Angeles-San Francisco plane list Feb. 9. the Joss of eleven lives. A. R. "Tommy" Thompson was helpless to prevent the crash. I the repor; indicated, becalm of the Bond Set For Two For Theft Ol Mare O. C. Ellis and Hmer wer being Held In Taylor county Ja last night in lieu of bond, se on each by Justice of the Peace James Gray Bledsoe Saturday whe they waived examining trial on charge of horse stealing. The complaint, made by the sher id's department, alleged that El acd Splawn, together with another party not apprehended, stole a mare from H. T. Strickland of North Park- February 12. The horse was recovered by Sher- iff Sid McAdams and Deputy Ruck SIHey In Dallas Wednesday and the men arrested In Wichita Falls Thursday. Roy Mack Winters Club President WINTERS, Mar. S. Hack has been elected president of he Winters country club, ind he and W. L. Hinds nave been added o the board of Old members of the bond c 8. Jtekson, Lr T. Smith, Lyle Deffe- wcn, Car] Henslee and E. D. Stringer. Others named to offices at i recent meeting of the board vere L. T. Smith, vice-president- Jeffebtch, secretary; Jackson, talnger, Henslee, ground! and committee; Smith. Trank najon, C. N. committee; J. S- Bourn, A. J. Mc- Dinlel, T. A. Smith, Mrs. W. A. Mrs. I. N. Wilkinson, enter- tainment committee; Dr. It C. ilid- dor, George R Hill and Jack Wilk- inson tournament committee. A ruling was made by trie board one stock only b required for an entire family, providing children In the family are living at none and are unmarried. Mitchell County Man Is COLORADO, March Hollls Dossey of the Seven Well community near here received severe, injuries tonight In in automobile accident on highway 101 five and a. half miles north of Colorado to- night A sedan driven by Dossey was de- molished when It colUded with a truck driven by BUI Chadwict of Colorado. The drivers were ippar- received a broken left arm, lacera- tions of lips and face and lost his upper front teeth. ChadTrick Taj unhurt. Dossey was carried to Root hos- pital here. Ti-.c accident, p.ar.e .r.e had cut KIBITZER, Pp. 12, Col. 4 ever -Jhe bay aiV. woulfl have '.ar.d- td n seconds had rol the microphone jammed the controls. The statement declared that steps already havt taken to prevent ar.y rccuncrxe or such a "which could have hap- per.ec! only under unuv.ial coxbina- of Today For Mrs. W. M. Vance Funeral services for Mrs. W. M. Vance of Mineral Wells, relative of several Abllenlans, will be held at the Caps Baptist church at 3p.m. today, with the Rev. Mr. Jackson officiating. Mrs. Vazicr died at 3 p. m Sat- urday In Mineral Wells. She Is sur- vived by a son. A. C. Wood, and sev- eral grandchildren in Abtieze; a son, Solcn Wood, in California; two dau- gh'.rrs, Mrs. J. H. Vance of Miner- al ar.d Mrs. S. P. Vance of Fori Worth, ar.d tiro sisiters, Mrs. M. G. Caperusn, Bronte, and Mrs. Molly Powell of FV-zhugh, Texas. Pallbearers will be R. C. Suggs, I A. Roach. Luther A. B. Boyd, B. Norman, and Willie Caperton. ARGUMENTS OVER VAST KING RANCH DOMAIN IN SOUTHWEST TEXAS TAKEN TO COURT BY Farmers Meet In Merkel And Trent Seventy-five persons attended a farmers' meeting in Merkel Satur- day afternoon, at wrilch County Agent Knox Parr eiplalced the 1937 farm program a-d J. Walter Hammond of Tye discussed the or- ganization of community, county and slate agricultural Earlier In the day a sn-.ill group heard Parr at Trent In a sirrular meetir.g. The meetings were the last in a series of 11. held in Taylor county communities. Next week farmers nU i: 2 p m. Monday in Merkel. Tues- day In Buffalo Gap. Wednesday :n Bradshavf acd Thursday In Abi- lene to elect community cobLT.it- teemen In the soil conservation program. The Weather Saturday. amount for the entire of three days. 1 25. Balrd 1 SO. 1 30. 
                            

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