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Abilene Morning Reporter News: Sunday, May 8, 1927 - Page 35

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   Abilene Morning Reporter News (Newspaper) - May 8, 1927, Abilene, Texas                                 PAGE POUR  THE WESTERN WEEKLY, (MAGAZINE SECTION) SUNDAY. MAY 8, 1927.  lemtArf  B J CL C. RI STER,  id Che West Texts ll—n ria I Ion  Historical  “Taken from raj ho esc by tho Ixv-AIatls la Les*»» Valley, Llano County Texas, on Wednesday, February ft, IMS, my wn. Lee Temple Friend, a«o etgbt years, Made eyes, light hair, and Cair complexion; a1 ho, ray neighbor's daughter, Maltnda Claude, age ■even, blue eyes, fair complexion and light hair. AH Indian Agents and traders, or any person having an opportunity, are requested to reacne the above named children; and de* ttverlng them to me or notifying me of their whereabouts, will be liberally  A Simple Application  That Dissolves Blackheads  No more squeezing and pinching to get rid of those ugly blackheads. Get a little Calculi# powder from any drug ■tore, sprinkle a little on a hot, wet cloth, rub ever the blackheads, and In two minutes every blackhead will be dissolved away entirely.  BEING OUT THE  HIDDEN BEAUTY  A face which la aged, faded or discolored is never a pretty face. There are many kinds of ugly complexions, and the causes are infinite, yet to use a trite phrase “Beneath that old. withered complexion la one lair to look upon,** la only repeating what women In high social positions have known for generation#. To reveal the beautiful under akin, you must peed off the outer akin. Ton can do this quickly, •urely and safely, at home, with pure merco iixed wax.  Purchase an ounce at any drug store or beauty counter. Apply like a cold cree rn. to face, at bedtime, tor rn few nights; washing off In the morning. Tiny Invisible Bakes of skin are regularly washed away with the wax. Freckles, blackheads, liver spots, moth patches fleck off and skin imperfections disappear Uke magic. No pi in and no inconvenience. Soon the young, live underneath skin appears clear, soft, girlishly charming and enchantingly beautiful. MercoUzed wax brings out the hidden beauty.  Fire*!'-*, Cookie*. fiat, tai r. I. V. tai other St* #d-k art Makes, slightly toed tJ'-a; excellent condition. All Takes sr* few! Send only 91 deposit on ••eh tire wanted, to • ne ranter postage: Balance C. O. D. awaft ast—Jdarrie ut yle wanted; whether Clincher or S. 3-  US    THO    Tiles  Nut    92-79    91-19  „    tm    i .si  ttiS&    9.99    1.69  91x4    4.19    1.19  92x4    4.29    I IS  19x4    4.99    2.99  14x4    IJS    LII  TUES TIBET 99.29    12.99  9-54    2.79  1.99    2.99  1*5    9.29  95x9    4 99    9.S4  29x4-49 9.95    1.75  (F. O.I., ILC..Mo.)  ORDER NOW-Tim Taks No Risk, ms we Mil cheerfully refund on ell Bree not meeting j’er appro.el open delivery, lf returned att arusa.  STANDARD TIRE CO.  13:1 Summit 8*.    Kane a a City, Mu.  L Writs for Ham THV* Barwin List and fat*#  ! CHILD’S BEST LAXATIVE -FIG SYRUP i  ; CALIFORNIA  ^<«te«>eriet WTI  LOTHER! Fven ooPfitipated. bilious, Mvoritb, or sick, colic Babies and Childre.! love to take gt-uuioo “California Psf? Byr ip.** No other laxative regulate* the tender little bowels so nicely. It sweet snit the stomach and starts the liver and bowels without griping. Contains no ■atcolics or soothing drugs. Say **Cali-torrila** to your druggist and avoid counter^ its. Insist upon genuine “California  Ste litmiii  1  ut irish MMtl irr.  remunerated. Arizona and New Mexico papers please copy, fVb. 22.—  John & Friend.**  JHS foregoing advertisement appeared in the June, 1868, Austin Daily Republican and ran for several issues thereafter. At the time it was first noticed by the writer he was searching for other information in this old publication, but immediately all else was forgotten in his desire to find whether or not this heart-breaking appeal of the distracted parent had brought about the recovery of the lost children. A close perusal of the pages of the succeeding issues of this newspaper gave no additional light un the affair, and for a time all traces were completely lost Indian Raids—  The conditions on the frontier bringing about the unsettled Indian 'relations were deplorable indeed. The reconstruction period following the Civil War had brought in a condition bordering on anarchy. The element formerly in control of State affairs was now under the iron rule of the federal military regime. So engrossed were the radicals in attempting to carry out their program that scarcely any attention was given to the frontier. This being true, the Comanche and Kiowa Indians of the Red River country were depredating along the border with scarcely any attempts on the part of the State authorities to punish them. A statement prepared by the Commander of the Military Division of the M issouri concerning these forays read in part ihat the Indians were very active during the raiding season after which they would “hide away their villages in remote places, living off of the plunder during the winter season and glorying in the scalps taken and in the horrible debasement of the unfortunate women they held as prisoners.”  It is exceedingly difficult for one living in this peaceful age to realise the disastrous extent to which these hostile forays were carried out during this period. Even the central portion of our state was not immune to these savages. The editor of the San Antonio Daily Express in one of his editorials of this year complained that the warriors had carried out a raid within fifteen miles of San Antonio.  A visitor from West Texas, writing from Waco, about the same time, claimed that the frontier had been pushed in for a distance of one hundred and fifty to two hundred miles, and added that the whole State seemed to be in a fair way of depopulation. An army officer stationed on the border reported that in .January, twenty-five persons were killed, nine scalped and fourteen children captured and carried away as captives; In February, seven were killed, fifty horses and mules stolen and five children captured; in May, three houses were attacked and burned; in June, one man was killed and three children, belonging to a Mr. McElroy, were carried away captives; and in July, four persons were killed on the Clear Fork of the Brazos. After detailing depredations thus far, the writer then generalized by saying that since June, 1862, eight hundred people had been killed along the Southwestern frontier by these savages.  A Practical Business To the casual reader the accounts concerning the capture of to many women and children by the hostile Indians might appear inexplicable,  yet when one studies the detailed accounts of these affairs the answer seems quite plain. The savages were not only giving vent to their antipathy for the whites in this manner but to carry out such forays successfully was a practical business 'venture to them. White traders and thieves living in the Red River country were quite willing to trade them guns, ammunition, and needful supplies for stolen animals and plunder, and usually the distracted parents aud kinsfolk were anxious to pay them well for the return of their loved ones. The manifestation of this desire, as we find mentioned in the advertisement to the Austin Daily Republican prefacing this discussion, undoubtedly stimulated the savages to take away as captives as many women and children from their homes as they could handily get away with. In many instances, however, they brutally murdered them rather than be overtaken by a punitive expedition sent out by the settlers.  It was during the troublous times of this period that a marauding baud of Comanches raided a settlement in Llano County. On February 5, 1868, Horse back, a Comanche Chief, led his warriors into Legion Valley and raided the farm of John S. Friend. As a result of the raid, the little boy, Lee Temple Friend and his playmate, “Minnie” Claude, were captured, an older sister of “Minnie/* and her child were killed, together with two female cousins. As the mother of Lee Temple was making her way toward the house she was struck by an arrow which transfixed both her arms and breast. WHen she fell one of the savages partially scalped her and carried away his bloody trophy. The Indiana thought that she was dead but when her husband, who together with his oldest daughter was away from home at this time, arrived on the scene, he removed the arrow from her body and hastily brought in a physician. Under the careful treatment of friends and loved ones the mother soon recovered from her terrible experience. Recovery of Melinda Claude—  At the time the writer,came in contact with the advertisement previous  ly referred to, Professor Richardson of Simmons University, his colleague, copied the following extract from th* Indian Papers of the Texas State LA horary!  Upper Arkansas Agency Fort Larned, Kansas August 4, 1868. Hon. Thomas Murphy,  Supt. of Indian Affairs.  Sir;  I have the honor to inform you that I have recently procured from the Comanche Indians, a white female ehild whom they held captive. She is a bright, i»* telligent girl of about eight years of age and says that her name is Melinda Ann Claude, that she was captured in Texas about the beginning of last winter, that at the time she was taken there was also a boy made prisoner whom she calls Temple, and who is still with the Indiana. She states also that the time she was captured her sister and her child, two female cousins and the mother of the boy, Temple, were killed by 'the Indians. She has always been called Minnie and gave that ac her name when first questioned by me. She speaks about her brothers named William Thomas Claude, Mark Wesley Claude, and Jerry Green Claude. By accident I discovered her in the Comanche camp and compelled them to give her np to me without ransom. She is now being taken care of by my wife and I will continue to retain her with my family until I can hear of her parents or relations or receive instructions from the Department, in regard to the disposition I shall make of her.  I have the honor to be with much respect, your Obedient Servant,  (Con ti Trued on Face 7)  STOP WHISKY  Drus*. parasol - !#, “Jaae aaa tuaaeoe. Wa curt it Genuine Seeley ere* un a ne Come end see reeulta Man* referenoes Write Keeler Institute, tm Sorest. Dallas  SMMU  SAY “BAYER ASPIRIN” and INSIST I  Unless you see the "Bayer Cross” on tablets you are not getting the genuine Bayer Aspirin proved safe by millions and prescribed by physicians for 25 years.  DOES NOT AFFECT THE HEART  Accept only “Bayer” package  which contains proven directions.  Bandi Also  Aapim Ie (Se trade aul af Beret Maoafaetaie el MeeoeaeUeecMketef af SalkarliceeiS  ly “Bayer* bowe of 12 tablets bottles of 24 and IOO—Druggists.   

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