Abilene Morning Reporter News, May 8, 1927, Page 27

Abilene Morning Reporter News

May 08, 1927

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Issue date: Sunday, May 8, 1927

Pages available: 100

Previous edition: Sunday, May 1, 1927

Next edition: Sunday, May 15, 1927

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Publication name: Abilene Morning Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

Pages available: 23,768

Years available: 1912 - 1969

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All text in the Abilene Morning Reporter News May 8, 1927, Page 27.

Abilene Morning Reporter News (Newspaper) - May 8, 1927, Abilene, Texas * ?! > ' sunday Morning, Way 8, 1927. ■ SALESMAN SAM —~y ami mg* eeeri fired AS SeLL-HOP AT THS. riffleL O’ FRITZ, zm decides To Go BACK To His OLDOdO AT THE store. L PACE F1FTEM   '~--q THE Pi ESES—Vn'HAT Will. THE HARVEST BE VJWAT5 TMS MATTEIS , 6VL.W <3 ^ L ?— ^SOMg OMS BEEM MEANJ TO VOO . — /voove BEEM SiAJGlNJG AROUND LIKE A OM I OO/sjT KAJOMJ-SiRDB DOMT*^ SlNJd ALL THE TIME _ CAMARJES DOWT S!M<£> WHEW TMCVee MOULTlMO «. I A/MT EXACTLY MOOUTI/SJ6 Ol/T THIS AJMT MV 5iMSiM<s time Either. /come to tmiajk op* it me. kepma^t f MEvea SAID NJ QTM I VIS TD CAJ coo {me. nj EMES ASKED ME POS ANJ ^ ENIS A6£M£\JT_ nj eves CALLEO AT TME MOUS£ - BUT ME SAID SOCH PSETTV TWM GS TM AT GIVE VOL’ BACIC' CSCCPS AMD MEAD ^ WHIRLS AMD I BELIEVED —BY SOL HESS —I .THEM AMD HAD MOPES/ ii    Til*    leal.    .In4i-MiriL.laa.1L    1>    >«t-    caca. (iv *    •    CZ*»<g FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS LOSING FAITH IN HUMAN NATURE —BY BLOSSER ( 6B£»rD6K)EAA*/3WM0 MPX    SOM&    WAY    VMS COULD EABM UTO OF MOM©/ SO VUE COULD POP'' K r OW, book/Look f IT SAYS' A&BB IM 7WIS’ MAfiAXIME * BOYS'.’ EAPM /AQMCy SELLIM6 POP CORM NWI7U OME. OF OORMACMJMES: rg^pr i,..„ ,mhmT )* IM ...BITO!.......... :M;:: ■ LES SEE'/YESS IR.' VHE’LU SEMO FOR OMC OF THOSE POP CORM AAACAIMES AMD M AkC LOTS' OF MOM EV-BJERYBOOV VUOOU? BUY n--' AM’ IT SAYS YOU DOMT AAVE 70 SEMO AMY I FROM US, I kMOW.'.’ BOY/ VWE'tb BE TW' OMLY CMES IMTDYJM VWITU A Pop CORM ANACAIME-V TUIMk Op TW MOM BV WELU BE AAARJM’ U MOM E Y -' tev.- - * 0 0 W <// J DOVUM AFCE Ar TW* «< Bo7Tom it SAYS TH' POPCORN MACAIME BILLBE SEMT C-O-D*—VWMAT DOES 7nAT MEAN}, FRECKLES?/  7/-- / * 0 v r/ By I kMEVJ TWERE WUZ A RETCH IM IT S0MEWMERE.7 BUM luck .'J'7KAr sali-vne goth IJL X KUI U t MT. CWT. frat7 MY MIA snwcx. am POP FAIR EXCHANGE —BY TAYLOR T Alleve Me - I'LL HAWE TO t>0 SOME STEPPING to GET TVT6 A«*Y FROM TNE OFFICE SO X CAN ECT MI ii butter into tub vja Re nooses - LET’S SEE WOW  , J rr^ss? ymat’6 vjrong VATU VOO H6WRV ? VOO LOOK ALL FA60EP OOT— Too MOCH WORRY IN the MAVBE VOO'RE Right—X was JOST WISHING X COULD CUTAWAY POR That’s a Bout idca.' nothing like a urrce VACATION To PUT A 6UY ON HIS FEET Then vol? RC ary] DOWT CARE IF I* UN OFF FOR AWHILE" — X Know IT WILL OO ME A tor OF Ca OOO AW AV? weq u a i*at, off. ’O’ **7 av **** OUT CUR WAY By Williams T GrOOO MOPMihiGr CHIE F — S AV-HAVE SOU HEAQO Ti4' OME ABOUT* *1U CHIMA MAM Amo Ta' marine ? . -jill GW pee* -that mewi guy is WHAT SOU CALL A POHTO AU-HE SPENDS SIXTEEN HOURS OUT CF Tweets FOUR OtGGiU’ UP FOMKlS "T sPRuG OM *TH‘ 0OSS SO HE Him LOAF MOST VstS, TH* BULL HAS A PASSI OM FOR n fumms stories but /MES AFRAID To STOP FEAR -that guv’ll sibp ppo Doom • sou KwoWI TM jane \ajmo Se. PT TiaT HL rvi^ UJHr iviuTJI WHU r\t_r I *    • VPF    e^HT^ ARA&AM ^ ^    a    "TH    OO    sam'    am K\    ii /S2±^\ 0M&    —WL LL HES MLR BROThEPi OUR BOARDING HOUSE ^ BEFOUL ACCEPT) ^6 sourc^allekigeTo a B0VCUM6 AAATctl FOR £5: A GAME) I WAtff To BE FAIR VirfM YOO EYT'ELUOG VOO MV AVERAGE ATT^' GAMEL' -'TAklUGT^' SCORE or "TEO (SAMES*, MV (SEOERAL AMENAGE ViOOLP BE '2.15’ N Wovi *TvlEO, ViOOLP VOO PATZER 0, SNITCH ToTipplV- VJ IU KS V / AVl TAKE^ I AM CLAP VOO ToLP ME NOOR AVERAGE BOULLE 5C0RE! OM m-BEiOG A TRUE SPORTSMAN I VMLL WOT TAKE APVAMi'AGE OF VOO, *~A MERE BOVaILIOG Wov/ice! 21^^- ,-EGAP— \F "Th! AT VSERE VoOR ViEtGUT WOO MAV VJEIL^/' FEEL DROOP, —Bii-f as <qi^- A BOVlLikSSi 5C0RS. TMEYfeETRViM' To BLUTF EACM oTlER OOT J ****** NEITHER of 'EM COOLP I GO POVaJM J .A BOM) Ll 06 AILEV IO A Tractor AO* MAKE) A STRIKE’ ^ */VSVlVTvJ\ SOTO OF 'EM MISS UALT Tri' RIOS IO TrieiR SHIRTS FROM Tri' lAilODRVL fl -v LM o LZ3X, •//avo -y*l fQ 3!. f-m -.t Cs Im ae Ii I p I «w\ W, ^VVi MV bis bovjuajq® HEM ^5.--5-.y> nag iii MT. air. Request (X Texans For Heacstones For Soldier Dead Soon to Be Granted War Department Opens Bids on 31,000 nr nxscoM bt. ttm.mons ru-portrr-Xe-ivN Staff Carrr^pcmtU CDL WASHINGTON, May 7.—The War Department today announced that it had had her cheeks, ning to do ‘What has Eddie Ban- with Nyda Loma*—• now? They used to be engaged, bu*; why should he attack you, whj^ ly announceu flho,lM N*yria him in her room a* ...... ..... requ. 1. from a m,dn.,ht,    CTlrd,    „h,m. number of T««    for    Umt.    iou headstones for tho graven of sol-    _    . dl.r», Milor. md marinas who dlrd /"'«•*    th*. while In r.Tvlre or after honorab!.    *”    —1“ dl4.r?lf*S I>«I ? f .1 n’t you fell m«! AJ'tor anP dfsrhargo from service. Requests in regular form sent to the adjutant general here can be taken care of soon. Awards have been made for 11,000 headstones. These headstones are to be sup- we’re engaged to be married, dL™. Can't you take me into your comr (Ider ce?” ‘ Maybe T didn't mean ai he teased her, reaching for plied not only for soldiers, sailors i«t to pay the check. "But—; and marines whose death occurred while in service and who are buried in national cemeteries, but the government will also supply them on request of friends or relatives to mark tho graves of any members of the above services who are now buried in private cemeteries throughout the country. The headstones for Civil War and Spanish American War veterans are of white marble with slightly rounded tops. The dimensions are SS inches long. 12 Inches wide and 4 inches thick. The inscription on this design is in raised letters within a sheld-shapcd panel. This is the design adopted when the government first began marking tho graves of service dead, and is retained for two wars named, and previous ones, including the revolution. The design of headstones for veterans of the World War is some what different. It Is also of white marble, hut is 42 inches long, 4 Inches thick and 13 inches wide throughout. The inscription is ’n V-sunk letters and consists of the soldier's name, the state from which he Came, his rank, regiment, division and date of death. This design was adopted out of deference to a sentiment for a distinctive design for World War service, but one not too strikingly at variance with those furnished for the dead of the nation » prior wars. Tho war department attends to marking the graves of members of the military or naval forces whose death occurs while In service and ho are buried in national come* teries, but headstones for thoso who are buried in private cemeteries are only furnished when application is made by relatives or friends. Congress recently appropriated tho sum of 1235,000 for the purchase of these headstones for the period up to June 30, 19 28, and while It is anticipated that this sum will not take care of all the unmarked graves of those who participated in all of th* wars since the War of Revolution to the present time, It Is believed that It will toke rare of all when It Is anticipated applications will be received during that period. orthingA r his WIST -just m 3 your own peace of mind—yoj| haven’t a thing in the world to fet from Nyda Lon ax.'*    His vol hesitated curiously between ‘he ti parts of the name, but Billy wag to# absorbed in wondering what ha meant by his other strange worAI to notice that faint, significant hesitation.    t (To Re Continued) Tn the next chapter Nyda Lomax Ie traps herself to T. Q. Curtis, and the latter, hurt and disappointed* begins to think he lias tx-en a fool. Gubernatorial Portraits DAUGHTERS OF MIDAS (Continued from rage 3. Section 2) self In your power, and someone else, too, at the same time, did you mean—Nyda ?’* Ho nodded, still smiling with faint amusement. “But how'. Dal, how?” she per alated, excitement rising swiftly to HUNTLEY hi CONCORD. N. I!    Smooth ing the path of lit# for tbs waif whose childhood Is beset with handier.ps ie ni-e* thin a hobby with Governor HuntLv N. Spaulding oT New Hampshire. Even his office requirements must walt vs Olin ho give* his attention to tho orphan, the d*«*tituto child or tho younystcr whose parents ar* divorced, Governor Spaulding take* time from bis barge business and political Interests to administer th* affairs of the New Hampshire Children’s Ald and Protective Sos ciety, of which h*» is pasiden^ and to which he contributes gens erous support, other young people's philanthropiee find him warmly rejrponsive. JACK LOCKWILL'S HIDDEN ENEMY —BY AHERN Th# Rocklike firs department was notified that th® Elwsl! farm I buildings wars burning. Than Jack, who had been told how th® frtah-msn gams was going, insisted on getting into his baseball suit and j going to the athletic field. He arrived there and hurried to the play-rs’ bench in the last of the seventh inning. •Tou'rt a fins fsl-Vlowto leave us like this, Lockwill!’’ said Bevns warmly, Vt I—t;a(/,;/,ul>* '.KH “Don’t jump 'on me till you hear my excuse, captain,” said Jack. “How’s the game stand?” “Twelve to ten against us, and Magovern’s all in,” was th* sn-^ swer. - “Mayba it can be saved yet.” encouraged Jack. “Cive me a man to warm up with, and th«n try rn® in there if 'Slants* doesn’t buck up and hold them.” Cg , J Jack lost no time chout warming up, arid *t vt* %Mu In at ho didn’t. McGovern was “all.in,” Just ss Bovin* Md said. Having lost his control, he filled the bases with Midhaven runners without getting a single put-out. Then he got Die hook, and Lock wilt walked toward the pitcher's position. The freshman cheering squad, seeing hun going to the mound, barked with joy. b'-*    outre* ma es*«u. mc.    (To Bk Cogtmued) , ;

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