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Abilene Daily Reporter Newspaper Archive: December 23, 1935 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Daily Reporter

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Daily Reporter, The (Newspaper) - December 23, 1935, Abilene, Texas                               t gbikne ISatlp Reporter "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES, WE SKETCH YOUR WuRLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES'-Byron EDI flON VOL. LV. Full Leased Wires of Associated Press (W) United Press (UP) ABILENE, TEXAS, MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, TEW PAGES (Evening Edition ot The Abilene Morning News) NUMBER 158 LINDBERGHS FLEE TO ENGLAND State Wins Title To Ector County Oil Land Hn Movies Irene Dennett Horsley, 22, (be- went from her Enid, Okla., "ime to Hollywood to sell maga- I vines and remained to make movies. She won a long term contract as an be known as Irene Bennett. (Asso- ciatcd Press Acquitted Sirs. Peggy Paulas, shown In the Port Orchard, Wash., jail nflrr a jury acquilled her of first dcffrce murder charges in con- nection with the deaths of six persons at Frlands Point. Leo Kail, co-defcndnnt, whom she accused, was convirlcrt anil sen- tenced to hang. (Associated Press Traffic Heavy; Lateness at Connecting Points Pelay on Texas Pacific pas- fiiingc-r trains, noted here since lats last '.vas explained Monday by W. R. Dnnlels. general agent. is being slowed pomrwlinL by unusually heavy car- risi.co or mail, express and pawen traffic, delay is chiefly due to th? the Texas Pacific rc- reivrs llw trains late at counseling pomls. Mr. Dnnicls said. The No. 1 Sunshine Special, t'boiMici, which arrived here flvs r.s laic Sunday night, operated on schedule from Toxr.rkana, where il was re-reived by the T. ft P. five hours late upon arrival from Louis. The (rain, due here nt o'clock, arrived at 11-20 Sunshine No. 2, ea.slboimd, due here at a. m., un.s scheduled (o arrive at a. in. Monday, because of dc- Inyed connection In El P.iso. Ijaturdiiy's rar.tbount) Sunshine, bet TRAINS, Face D, Col 7 Premter Laval To Offer No New Peace Plan; Eden In Control By Associated Press. Efforts toward developing a "solid military front" against possible Italian aggression in the Mediterranean were report ed successful in Europe today. No New Peace Terms From London came word that the British and French general staffs have concluded satisfactory consul- tations concerning mutual support by the armies and navies of Great Britain and France In cose of an Italian attack. Negotiations were reported open- ed in Paris among Premier Laval of France and Turkey and Greece with the same end in mind. Laval was said to have told the Italian ambassador that he would offer no new peace terms to Pre- mier Mussolini. As for the active military angle, the Italian government stated Its i forces In northern Ethiopia had beaten attack of Ethi- opian warriors. Anthony Eden, the "White Knight of the League of assumed control of British foreign policy to- day with a mandate to stop the Italo-Ethoplan war by internation- al pressure. The issue of war or peace in Eu- rope, hinging on the success of lep.cnie sanctions backed by the bay- onets of member nations, rested largely In his hands. Italy was both apprehensive and bitter over his annolntment as Brit- ish foreign minister. A wave of nomilar approval greet- ed Prime Minister Stanley Bald- win's selection of the 38-year-old former minister for league affairs to conduct the foreign policy of the British nation through the most anxious times In post-war history. Informed sources said Eden's first duty would be to formulate in de- tail the British policy for armed re- See WAR, Pane 9, Col. 2 Ardmore Slayer Doomed to Die ARDMORE, Okla., Dec. Death in the electric chair was de- creed by District Judge John B. Og- den today for Weldon Goodman, 19, for the confessed robbery slaying of Leo South, Ardmore taxicab driver. The sentence was passed on a guilty plea entered by Goodman, an Aylesworth farm youth, a week ago. Judge Ogden set the execution date for March 20. EU ROPE LINES UP UNITED FRONT ALLIES IN E FIFTY KILLED IN CAR ACCIDENTS By United Press Snow and heavy holiday traffic caused more than 50 deaths during the weekend "in an unusual number of road accidents in all parts of the United States. Fourteen persons were tilled when a bus skidded over the open end of a drawbridge at Hopewell. Va. Five were killed in the collision of a se- dan with a truck in Spartansburg, S. C., and four died at Taopi, Minn., in a train-automobile accident. Trains figured in three other ac- cidents. The Golden State Limited killed three men in a truck at Temple, Ariz., a passenger train at Omaha killed a man and woman, and a train at San Antonio killed one man and critically injured an- other. Police authorities said virtually all the accidents were caused by snow and sleet storms that disrupt- ed transportation to the beginning of the heaviest Christmas and New Year traffic in several years. Three men supposedly drowned in a truck -that crashed through lake Ice near Pon Du Lac, "VVis. A truck Wiled two youths at Wichita Kan. Two Houston truck driver were held on manslaughter charg es. Wet pavement caused the'death of two men and injuries to thre others at Mapleton, 111., and nea Wheeling, ill., another skid killei one man. There was one death In Chicago and five in New York the normal routine of weekend i cidents. Two deaths were reported in Indiana. By Thp IsMirlntfA Press Traffic accidents took ten lives 1 Texas over the week-end. Man other persons suffered Injuries. Three residents of Houston wer killed yesterday. Mrs. Mary Caldc Rice, 61, wife of Benjamin B. Rice Houston oil man and secretary treasurer of Bice Institute, was kill ed In an automobile collision at th edge of the business section. HP husband was injured. Mrs. Benny Lee McCalcb, 18, o Sec ACCIDENTS, Paje 9, Col. 5 Young Abilenian Victim Of Auto Accident Near Pampa Funeral rites for Holmes Caldwe: Oldham, 30, well-known Abilenian will be held from the First Baptis church at 10 o'clock Tuesday morn ing. Dr. Millard A. JenKIns, pastor will officiate. Oldham died at o'clock Satur day night In a Pampa hospital as result of injuries he received ear! Friday in an automobile mishaj "Ive miles southwest of Pampa on ;he Amarlllo highway. Death wa caused by internal Injuries. His condition was considered fav orable early Friday night after ai exploratory operation to determhi' ,he extent of injuries, but he faikM to rally and his condition tccam critical Saturday afternoon. Word of the accident and subse quent death shocked his 'rlends here and many telegram !rom the grief struck members o ;he younger set were received b1 .he family who rushed to the bed iide Saturday morning. His mothr.r Mrs. Minnie Oldham, a sister. Mis- See OLDHAM, Page 10. Col. 3 Mrs. M. J. Henderson Is County's Fifteenth Traffic Victim Knocked down by an automobile s she attempted to cross Butwr- nnt street at 12th about p. m Sunday, Mrs. Marie Josephine Hen- derson died at a.m. today In the West Texas Baptist sanitarium. She s Taylor county's 15th victim of raffic accidents tills year. Mrs. Henderson suffered head In- urles, a compound fracture of the ight leg, general body bruises and possibly Internal Injuries, Semi- onsclous when conveyed to the hos- In an Elliotts' ambulance, she egalned consciousness for only a ew minutes before death. Returning from an afternoon visit with friends to the home of her mpioyes, Dr. and Mrs. Eric D. 3el- ers, 1258 Vine street, Mrs. Hender- on was crossing Butternut going 'Cst. Dan Morris, driver of the au- nmobh'e, and his wife were en route outh to their home, 1372 1-2 But- ernut street. The Morrises report- d, said the patrolman who Investl- (90 FA1AIXY UUm. PMC 8, CL 2 Vehicle Taken Here Is Chased Through Mineral Wells Officers throughout West Texas are on the lookout for a 1935 De Soto sedan, stolen from an Abilene street early this morning and chas- ed through Mineral Wells about o'clock after the driver had failed to lay fo- gasoline he ordered at a Palo Pinto filling station. The car belongs to C. C. Clicno- weth and bears highway license plate 936-837. His son, C. B. Clien- oweth, returning last nleht from Sweetwater, picked up a hitchhiker, eft the man in the car when he topped at the depot after the two arrived here, and.came out to find its car gone, showed records of the Abilene police department. The hitchhiker was about 21 years Id, five feet 10 Inches high, weighed 50 pounds and with fair complex- on. About 4 a. m., the car r.'as nto R .station one mile west of Palo Pinto and filled with 1310 0118 of gasoline. When the driver Other Gov't Departments Taking Over Its Functions WASHINGTON, Dec. NRA, once keystone of the New Deal, was terminated today by ex- ecutive order of President Roosevelt Part of the functions of the emergency administration were transferred by the president to the commerce department while others were turned over to the labor de- partment. The division of review, the divi- sion of business cooperation, anc the advisory council went to the commerce department under the act approved at the last session of congress extending NRA until April The consumer's division was transferred to the labor department and Its employes will come under the emergency appropriation act which does not expire until June, .937. This was the law providing the work In moving the emoloyes from the unergency agencv into the perma- nent departments, the president nrovidecl that they should not thereby acnulre civil service status and thus become permanent em- ployes. By the president's order, signed today, the national recovery admin- istration, about which the entire government seemed to revolve two years, ago and which governed most of American Industry, was dissolved. There was no mention in the ex- ecutive order of Georpe Berry, in- dustrial coordinator, who has been working separately from the recov- ery adrrflnlstratioh proper. President Roosevelt sr.ld a few days ago. how- ever, that Berry's acTlvllles fitted In with his plans for winding up NRA's affairs. The executive order terminating Sec NRA, 9, Col. 5 Woman Slayer of Rival Freed NEW VORK, Dec. Mrs. Etta Relsmnn. 35-year-old housewife, was freed under super- Islon of the court today when Counly Judge Charles S. Colden of Queens county gave her a 6-to-12 ear suspended sentence for the laying of Miss Virginia Eclgh, prct- y 23-year-old secretary of her hits- and. Texas And Pacific Ha Contended that It Wa Given Strip By Gran Of Congress WASHINGTON, Dec. The state of Texas tc day won title to a strip of ric oil land 200 feet wide along th right-of-way of the Texas an Pacific railway company, in tor county, Texas, under decis ion of the supreme court. Dismiss Appeal The court dismissed the appeal o the railroad from a decision of th Texas supreme court holding tha the land belonged to Texas. The new case grew out of law passed by the state covering title t the land. The railroad claimed It wns give Oie contested area by a grant congress. The state charged th whatever the federal grantiamocinl ed to, It had been waived by th railroad. Attorney General William Me Craw and his assistant, H. Grac Chandler, eime to Washington defend .the. Cine jThiy lirire ed to argument on the. right of th supreme court to entertain" the ap> peal after members of the court ha closely tiuestloned T D Gresham the road's counsel, on the sam point. The court refused to go int the merits of the controversy. AUSTIN, Dec. "M best Christmas Atlorne General William McCrnw exclalmei today when notified that the U. E supreme court had sustained th state's retention of mineral rights under the Texas nnd Pacific rail day right-of-way. "It's a great feel Ing to be on the winning side In case before the U. S. suprcm court.'" McCraw argued the case a Washington last Wednesday. It w.i to have been submitted on twi and on mer it. During arRUment the court Hm Ited discussion to the question o jurisdiction. Involved was whether the ejan the legislature to the railroad In 1850 and subsequent transaction; See HIGH COURT, Page Col. A. B. Cox, Taylor County Resident Since 1890, Succumbs Special to The Reporter TUSCOLA, Dec. B. Cos lioneer settler In Taylor county, dine .t his home in Tuscola this morn ng at o'clock following a long llness. He had been confined to the ed for the past seven months, Funeral services will be held from he Baptist church here at 1 o'clock Tuesday aiternoon. with Rev. Thorn- is J. Young of Abilene, former pas- or of the church, officiating. Mr. Cox was born In Alabama In 861, moving to East Texas a; nail boy. He came to Taylor couu- y In 1890, two years after his mar- age to OpLiella Fuller. Survivors are his wife, two sous Rev. Jerry Cox of Tulsa, Okla., Jas B. Cox of Tuscola; a daughter Mrs. Ray Stephenson of Tusc Five grandchildren and one great grandson also survive. Roy I'uller ol Abilene b a nephew. Pallbearers will be H. B. Williams W. L. McCormlck, Walter J. !nr. O. E. Blackwood, Ehilo Jones and Guy Williamson. Jcnk'ns and Hodge funeral home will be In charge of the iirrnngc1.- incnts, Pioneer Foard Countian Dies CROWELL, Dec. J. H. ieif. IB, one of the three founders f Fonrd county In 1891, died Albert Haiisscr, former Hexnr conn- cart disease Ills home here last i ty sheriff, also former Maverick ALBERT IIAUSSER DIES SAN ANTONIO, Dec. ,lght. of the retired business nine children nnd his widow, county sheriff and former chief cus- toms Inspector for the Western Tcx- Seo CAB STOLEN, Ff. 0, Col, 7 j gathered for a holiday reunion, were, as district, died today nt Ills home til his bedside. 'here. Stars Honor Mrs. Astor NEW VORK. Dec. (UP) Mrs. Vincent Astor will be hon- ored Jan. 5 by an entertainment which on the stage or In a radio studio would be worth nearly "Undignified enter- tainment by dignified artists" Is to be given In Mrs. Aslor's honor because of her work In behalf of financially stranded musicians. Among stare on the program will be Lawrence Tlbbelt, Lucreila Bori, Jischa Hclfelz, Richard Crooks, Illy Pans. Laurllz Mcl- ohlor, John Charles Thomas, Al- bert Spaldlnj, Harotd Bauer and Georges Barrcre. JURY PROBES STAITSDEATH Evidence Tends To Show It Was Accidental LOS ANGELES, Dec. Evidence strengthening the belief that Thelma Todd, blonde screen star, met an accidental death in her garage was scheduled to be submit- ted to the county grand jury todny, Scientific tests by city chemists, police homicide officers and district attorney's investigators were report- ed to have_ dlsclgSp! that: the garage where she died wltl: deadly carbon monoxide gas in two minutes. 2. The car holding the body prob- ably had not been driven since late Saturday or early Sunday. 3. The motor of the car could not be heard In the quarters of Charles H. Smith, employ of Miss Todd's cafe, above the" garage with only a vague sound audible when the en- gine was raced. Thirty witnesses, close friends of the actress or persons who thought they saw her hours after she had returned to her beach home from a film colony party, gathered at the Jury chambers. Deputy district at- torneys prepared to question them with hopes of establishing when the actress died. Deputy District Attorney George Johnscn said the symposium was ng conducted first to fix wheth- er Miss Todd died early last Sun- day morning or from 12 to 20 hours later. "If there Is any rrnson to believe Miss Todd did not die accidentally, first indicated, suffocating from carbon monoxide gas, then we will question other witnesses n'o-3 new Johnson said, Principal witnesses claiming the )londe could not have been dead early Sunday morning were Mrs. Martha Ford, wife of Actor-Director Wallace Ford, and Mrs. Rowland West, estranged wife of Miss Todd's 3Uslness associate and close friend. Mrs. Ford said she talked to the ilmpled screen star over the tele- phone Sunday afternoon. Mrs. West said she saw Miss Todd in her 'haeton In Hollywood at 11 p. in. Sunday night accompanied by a See TODD CASE, PB. S, Col. B WILL ABANDON II. S. HOME FOR SAKE OF BABY (Copyright, 1935, By United NEW YORK, Deo. Chas. A. Lindbergh fled from America with his wife and three-year-old son, Jon, on the liner American Importer at a. m., Sunday, to establish a new home in England where he hopes to live quietly and assure bis son the normal childhood that has been denied him in the United States. They sailed secretly from New York, having bought the ex- clusive passenger occupancy of the combination passenger and cargo vessel, which is due in England the last of the month. Threats against the life of Jon and the excitement attending the approaching execution of Bruno Richard Hauptmann, con- victed murderer of their first son, impelled their decision to leave America, a close friend of the family said today. They may never return to this country, although the Colonel does not intend to give up his American citizenship. The American Importer was scheduled to sail at midnight Saturday but was held up almost three hours for the Lind- berghs. Officials of the Unite States lines refused to deny o affirm the Lindberghs wer aboard, but the United Pres learned from other sources tha lliey were. To Give Son a Chance. Col. Lindbergh Is determined tha ills son shall have the opnortunll .o grow up normally. In the Unl ed States there hung over th lousehold the ever-present fea :hat Jon might meet the same foj s the Lindbergh's first born iharles Augustus Jr. That fear'was ktpt: alive by lew of .threatergig letters BT ;omobiTe taking Jc5h 'and hljTnurs lome from school forced to th curb by another machine, whose oc cupants took quiet pictures of Jo and then fled. The new glare of publicity on th jlndbergh case with Hauptmann .pproachlng execution and publ discussion of the case by Gov. Har lid Hoffman ot New Jersey on ithers also contributed to the Llnd lerghs' decision to make a lome In Englanu. United states and British govern ment officials as well as steamshl iperators cooperated with Llndberg n keeping their departure secrc mtil today. Only a few closest members of th amlly saw them off on the com paratively small ship, which saile rom a Hudson river pier early Sun day morning. Other members of tin Sec LINDBERGHS, Pasc 9, Col. 7 Grounded Liner Is Refloated N. J., Dec. Fruit liner Irlons CAPE MAY, The United iground overnight on Brandywln Shoals near the mouth of the Dela vare bny, was refloated today on leaded under her own power fr 'hlladelphia. The Cape Mny coast guard sta Ion reported the ton ship arrying ten ppissengers and a crev f 50, was damaged and bci not taking in water. Bound from Honduran ports will cargo of bananas, the Irlona ran ground on the shoals mlflway b'j ween Cape May point and Lewe.< el., in a driving gale and snow fitnrm last night. Funds Already Received Will Provide for 550 Baskets, But Hope to Reach 600; Collections Behind Last Year Minus 57.73. That Is the truth, the whoie ruth and nothing but the truth bout the state of the Goodfcllows und this morning as compared with cut year's Monday before Chrlsl- ias. Today's noon total stood at 939.14; liut year's, same day, )n that the merchandise fferings by firms and women of can pnck about 550 din- er baskets. Lost year the Monday cforc Christmas was Christmas evf, the campaign had virtually come I he end that morning. This year hrlstmas falls day aflrr tomorrow, o we hnvc another full day to go: id If we can Ret additional e cnn pack 1100 baskets, mnybc ore. That will catch every famil; the appeals list, dlsappolntlp.i obody. Well. Ihn campaign hangs on rend. Snip It lilgli or low, as you'Sec GOODFELLO1VS, Tg, It's up to the GoodMlows and we've turned Into the stretch. Our guess: a little over That will beat 1934 and give us a cause for plenty congratulations. The maximum goal Is definitely out now, not enough tlmr remaining. Sunday's overnight and Monday morning offerings ran to a gratifying showing. Two con- tributed heavily: the annum offer- ing of Reporter-News employes, run- ning and a nlft from n dnrk-cyed man who strode up to desk of the GoodMlows' secretary, laid down a ten and throe flvrs, said "Call it name, smiled, refused lo give his and departed, rhc minute we looked at him we he wns a there wi.s I hat cxprc.vjlun In his cyrs. So I hanks lo the anonymous Contents of Petition To Pardons Board Not Made Public J., .Dec. tlofi for clemency was fil with the'cburt of pardons. The petition was filed by Col. Mark O. Kimberllng, principal keep- er at the state prison, who sent a, messenger with 6 copies of 1t to Al- bert R. Hermann, the clerk of the pardons court. The contents of the petition were not made public, In conformity with a rule of the court that such ma- terial must not be published unless the court so permits by vote. At the same time it was learned definitely that one of the eight members of the court of pardons would not be able to take part in the deliberations on the Hauptmann [jetltlon. Judge George Van Buskirk, of Hackensack, Is In the Neurological :iospltal, New York City, undergoing treatment for a nervous disorder. Members of his family said they expected him home some time this week, but stated definitely his con- dition -would not permit him to nt- ,end the Hauptmann hearing. Vnn Busklrk's absence will mean Hnuptmann must obtain the votes of Sec HAtTPTMANN', Pf. 9, Col. 7 YoiitlTKilied In Train-Car Crash SAN ANTONIO, Dec. W. A. Sills, 24, was In a critical con- dition today and Richard Kirk, 21, was dead of Injuries suffered when wo trains struck the automobile In n-lilch were riding yesterday. An costbound freight struck tho car, carried It 75 feet, then hurled t across a .parallel track Into the sath of a westbound freight trc.ln. Sills operates a filling station icre. Kirk, his employe, came here ecently from Center, Ala. HAVANA BOUT OFF NEW YORK, Dec. Mike Jacobs, the fight promoter, re- urncd today from Cuba and an- ounccd the proposed heavyweight out between Joe Louis, Detroit egro, and Izzy Gastanaga on Dec. In Havana Is "off definitely." Abilene nml vicinity Fair tonlcht; iirsdny partly cloudy. Went of loolh nlr lonlKht and Tuesday; colder In Pan- niile conCfiM. Kaflt Textis of 100th meridian ilr, slightly colder In r.orlli central por- on lonlfht; Tneadny imr'.ly cloudy, colder r portions. r-i Temperatures t V i! jjon. o.ni. a.m. M 
                            

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