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Abilene Daily Reporter: Tuesday, December 3, 1935 - Page 1

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   Abilene Daily Reporter, The (Newspaper) - December 3, 1935, Abilene, Texas                               "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES, WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT 4> VOL LV- Full Leased Wlret Of Associated Press (UP) ABILENE. TEXAS, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3, TEN PAQES (Evtnlnp Edition ot The Homing Newt) NUMBER Convicted Bank Robbers Escape Haile Selassie Makes New Bid For Peace With Italy BOYCOTT SHIPS LOADED ON GULP OF Actor's Suit Charges Triangle New charges of being a horacwreclier were filed against Natalie Hays Hammond (left daughter of John Hays Hammond, millionaire mining engineer, in connection with-the- of affections suit brought by Leonard Doyle (below) Broadway actor. Doyle asierts that Mlsa Hammond stole the love of his wife, Leozia Hozarth Doyle (right, who has left hb to live air the kjjarmehf in' New York Clly. Labor Department An Road Board Differ On Question AUSTIN, Dec. Ing wage means one thing to th state labor department and anoth er to the state highway department a legislative committee had dlscov ered today as It continued a hear Ing to discover which is right. Labor officials told the commute yesterday that they had submltte the rate of wages paid on othe public works In Austin and on prl vate works to support what they consider a prevailing wage. They said the highway department re fused to disclose the source of It. Information, other than that It wa .Abased on Information from con "tractors, The committee sent a request ti the highway department to give It basis of determination. Wages paid on a highway ware- house building at Camp Mabry werr specifically attacked. W. E. Griffin Tyler, said highway contracts specl (led less than prevailing wages in See WAGES, Pafr 9, Co7. 8 Outlook Promising For North China SHANGHAI, Dec. spread confidence prevailed in Chi- nese official uuarters today that the central government's proposals for reforms to prevent North China secession would prove acceptable to northern leaders. A Japanese embassy spokesman also said the outlook was promising for s. settlement of Nankmg-Norch China differences on the basis of a program for autonomy under an- other name. Chinese officials awaited optim- istically, therefore, the outcome of the negotiations efc Footing between Gen. Ho Ylng-Chln, Nanking war minister, and northern provincial leaders. f BUSBY TO SPEAK Horace W. Busby of Fort Worth, 'Church of Christ evangelist, will apeak on "Is ChrUt Reigning o'clock tonight at the A.C.C. auditorium. Tire nationally known Church of Clirlst speaker will conduct the meeting In Abilene through next Sunday, ni 11 a. m. and p. m. dally. Dis't Attorney Otis Miller to Present 35 Cases For Investigation The grand Jury of 104th district court is to reconvene Wednesday morning to ivind up work for the current term, which closes Saturday, December 21. Thirty five complaints wil) be presented to the body for Investiga- tion, said District Attorney Otis Miller of Anson, who was In Abilene Tuesday preparing the cases. Charges involved Include forgery, passing of forged instruments, burg- lary and theft. There will also be one murder case, that of John Olgln, Mexican, charged with the fatal shooting of Abundlo Ramirez, Sunday night. AVALANCHE BURIES VILLAGE GUAYAQUIL, Ecuador, Dec. landslide burled the village of Verde Cocha early today, killing ts 50 Inhabitants instantly. Break in Heretofore Solid Ranks of Shippers Reported HOUSTON, Dec. ment of the gulf coast dock strike was forseen today although the In- ternational Longshoremen's associa- tion has called a nation-wide boy- cott against shipping lines In this area, which operate with Independ- ent labor. The boycott was called by Joseph P. Ryan, New York, International president of the ILA. According to Mike J. Dwyer, Galveston, district ILA head, Ryan excluded the Lucfc- enbach Gulf Steamship company, the Newtex line and the Bull Steam- ship line. "These lines are willing to sign up with us here in the gulf and re- sume normal Dwyer said. "I think some action along that line win be taken not later than tomorrow.1; Break In Ranks Exemption of the three companies was seen as a break in the here- tofore solid ranka of the steam- shippers and revived hope for an early settlement of the strike, which began in the western gulf an Oc- tober 11. Dvyer-sald the boycott would be far-reaching' "ILA win refuse to work ships of the French line In New Dwyer said, "because that line is represented down here and has re- fused to try to reach a settlement of our trouble! through the federal meditation board. 'Other lines thus affected will be the North German-Lloyd, the Ham- burg-American, the N. Y. K. and O. S. K., Japanese lines and several Scandanavlan he' continued. Although the three exempted lines want to sign a new labor agreemenl immediately, Dwyer added, none bs offered until all troubles and disputes have been cleared up. Then Allred Will Not Issue Pardons This Christmas AUSTIN, Christmas pardons will not be Issued In Teiw this year, GOT. James V. Allred announced today. "Clemencies should be bued on merit and on merit the governor said. "If a convict It entitled to clemency, be it fvlnr to cet It whether It is Tnanka- glTlni, Christmas, the fourth of July, or some other daj. I tx- pect to continue U> study tbe records and the recommendations of the board of pardons and paroles." King George of England Warns That Deficiency In Defense Must Be Made Good See BOYCOTT, Fife 9, Col. 5 Potter Co. Liquor Cases Dismissed AMARILLO, Dec. s repeal of local option prohibl- ion in Potter county yesterday. District Judge E. C. Nelson today dismissed 16 liquor cases on motion of District Attorney Grady Hade: wood. The cases were filed under the )ld Dean act and four of them In- olved Injunction suits against al- eged liquor-selling establishments. Unofficial returns from all but ne small precinct in Monday's lection showed votes for legal- zed sale of liquor and votes gainst. Sales will become legal fter the commissioners court make .n official canvass of the returns lext Saturday and permits are ob- ained. STRIKE TH1T Union Carpenters Quit Work Because of 'Low' Wages FORT WORTH. Dec. Threat of a general strike hung ver the building trades in this city oday. Dissatisfaction engendered by low" wages, reached a climax late esterday when 25 union carpenters miked off the Job at the new 00 Riverside high school. Failure of the contractor, Harry Medman, to meet a demand for ai: ncrease of 25 cents an hour over ie present an hour scale was iven as the reason for the walk- ut. At a special meeting of the school oard. Friedman tald the carpenters ad agreed to finish construction egun prior to Aug. 1 at the H rate, provided the rale was paid on new construction. How- See STRIKE, 9, Col. I Pardons Board Rules Against Clemency For Perjurer AUSTIN, Dec. 3. pardon board members today ad- vised Gov. James V. Allred against clemency for W. D. Welburn, Jr., former San Antonio Methodist pas- tor, given a seven year prison sen- tence on conviction of perjury. Mrs. Wineta Long Weiburn had sued for divorce and he testified that they were never married. He was convicted on testimony that Uiey were legally married. Allred planned to make his final decision today after hearing a San Antonio delegation seeking clemency 'or Welbum. The governor said he would make ils decision Thursday on granting a reprieve to Plerton Cantrell. Wood county man convicted of murdering Frank Guy, Edgewood. Cantrell 13 Attorneys In Drake Case Want Witnesses at Federal Expense CHICAGO, Dec. attorneys1 In the Drake estate mall fraud Wai of 41 persons had be- fore Federal Judge Phillip L. Sulli- van today e. request that the gov- ernment be ordered to foot the bill for defense character witnesses. The court was notified that gov- ernment witnesses would be recalled to testify to the defendant's reputa- tions. -Attorney George Crane de- clared some of the witnesses were without funds and -that they should >e maintained at Chicago at fed- eral expense until recalled. Judge Sullivan reserved his rui- ng. C. E. Achenbach, Boone, la., chiro- practor, returned to the stand yes- terday to admit he gave mistaken testimony last Week. Aehenbach said he kept records of donations for J. Verne Carlson, also of Boone, a defendant. Previously Achenbach said he did not keep such records. He explained he was confused dur- ing his first appearance. John A. Hull, Boone postmaster, testified Carlson asked him If he See TRIAL, Page 9, Col. 4 Ex-Official Free of Bribery Count DALLAS, Dec. brib- ery trial of Tony Palumbo, former assistant district attorney, came to an abrupt end today when the couit gave an instructed verdict of no', guilty. Loud protests of defense attorneys that "we don't want an instructed verdict" were overlooked by Judge Noland G. Williams as he handed a written, instructed verdict to th? lury foreman to sign. Palumbo was reinstated as an as- sistant district attorney a. few min- utes after District Attorney Robert Hurt had shouted to the packed courtroom that PaJumbo would be returned to his position.. A similar Indictment against Frcci Jiadbeny. former deputy sherifi, was dismissed. They had been charged with accepting a bribe In policy racket case. By the Associated Press. Emperor Haile Selassie ol war-torn Ethiopia has made an other bid for peace with Italy an authoritative religious source in Cairo divulged today. While Premier Mussolini cre- ated a "brains trust" to remod el tbe Italian diet war- time lines and the British treas nry offered two gigantic loam of which may be usec for was learned the king of kings has appealed to the supreme authority of tbe Coptic Christian church for aid King Warning Another king. George of Britain conveyed to his parliament the warning: "The fulfilment of our International obligations under the (League) covenant, no less than the adequate safeguarding of the em- pire, makes, it urRently necessary that deficiencies in the defense forces.be made good." "King George added that his gov- ernment would ask parliament to pass laws "limited to trie minimum required for these two purposes." Tho British government's foreign policy, said the king, "will, as here- tofore, be based on the firm sup- port of the League of Nations." Ethiopia's ruler would have the Patriarch Johannes Intervene wiOi the Italian government to establish a basis for peace conversations with Ihe Fascist minister to Cairo about the middle of the month. The request was made through Abuna (hlsh bishop) Cyril, former Monk who was r.hoscn by the Patriarch' to rule the Ethiopian church. In Abuna Official sources at Cairo said Halle Selassie called In the Abuna for a conference last Wednesday, the day before he began a 175-mile Journey from Addis Ababa to Des- sye to establish a field headquar- ters with his troops. Previously, the emperor had ap- pealed to the League of Nations to Intervene In behalf of peace. As the League of Nations boy- cott began to evidence Its effective- ness In Italy, the British treasury announced It had offered loans to- taling about since this comes at a time when Europe Is fearful of an outbreak of war In- Sw WAR, Page 9, Col. i Dallas Traffic Toll Is Now 107 DALLAS, Dec. H. E. Conder, 36, was found dead early today, the 107th traffic victim In Dallas county this year. She was found beside her wrecked automobile. The back of her head was torn olf. Investigators could not tell wheth- er Mrs. Conder was killed when her car was wrecked, or whether she was run over by a passing motorist alter being thrown from her own Hickman Testifies As Probe Of State Police Is Opened OllLEYK FORT WORTH, Dec. Capt. Tom Hickman, discharged ranger chief, appeared u the first witness In his own defense today before the legislative committee In- vestigating the fruitless raid Nor. 6 on Top o' HU1 Terrace, and Hick- man's subsequent dismissal. Hickman, under questioning of Rep. John Atchlson of Oainsvllle, told In detail the history of his law enforcement career. Rep. Harry Graves of Georgetown was sitting In on the hearing as at- torney for the Texas state safety commission. Following the proDe Into Hick- man's career as an officer, Atchlson Immediately la4Uiched Into questions to determine Hlckman's opinion of the safety commission. "Have any members of the com- mission had any experience In crime Atchlson asked. "Not to my Hickman replied. "Albert Sidney Johnson, the chairman, has a knowledge of law, but I cannot sr.> as to Mr. Cottlngham and Mr. Baker." "How about Mr. "He should have some knowledge as to highway work, hut. as to major crime I wouldn't say he had had much experience." The former ranger said that See PROBE, Page 9, Col. 3 Ickes Clarifies His Oil Cargo Statement Did Not Directly Call 0 Producers to Halt Ship- ments to Italy WASHINGTON, Dec. Secretary of Interior Harold L. Ickes today his recent stati- ment regarding shipments of Amer lean oil to Italy and Ethiopia. Ickes hod been quoted as callln upon American oil producers withhold shipments of petroleum (t belligerent nations. Today he said what he had was: "They (oil producers) ought tc co-operate in letter and spirit with efforts of the government to hal shipment of munitions of war to Belligerents." Reporters had understood Ickes In his position as oil administrator as directly calling upon American producers to withhold exports o petroleum to the warring countries Ickes eaid his statement, which lad international significance in Londan, Rome and Geneva, WA 'not a direct appeal" but "merely a general statement." He pointed out he was "wlthom authority" to issue such a requesl and said he was correcting the in- terpretation ot his statement "to keep the record straight." Ickes was asked why he waited tlmost three weeks to correct the 'mistaken interpretation" when It had created a mild sensation In in- ternational circles. He said: "If I were In the habit of cor. ectlng all mistakes attributed to See ICKES, Page 9, Col. 4 Rangers Arrive In San Angelo SAN ANQELO, Dec. Cap- tain R. C. Hawkins of Company C ol the Texas rangers, Stewart Stan- ley and Lcvi Duncan arrived here today to establish headquarters tem- porarily and put a curb on livestock thefts, throughout the territory- They were welcomed by Abe Mayer, aresident of the Texas Seep and Goat Raisers association. Albert Mace and Levl Bishop of ;he company arc operating out Uvalde, and Pete Crawford out Alpine. E Pioneer Group Gives To Fund For the Needy; Kiwanians First Happy days are here again. The Goodfellows are the happiest bunch on earth, theirs being the happiness hat springs from relieving the un- happlness of others, and the happl- st time of their lives Is In this an- nual period between Thanksgiving and Yuletlde when they start up the machine that brings Christmas to he otherwise Chrlstmasless. Start your contributions rolling, Goodfellows. Your secretary here In he Reporter-News office Is ready to ecelve and acknowledge them. Tis with pleasure that, today, he makes he usual acknowledgment to the sunl advance little group that gives the fund Its send- ff every year- Acknowledgments o the perennial No. 1 Qoodfellow, he Abilene Klwanls club, for 415; o this year's No. 2 Goodlellow, Phi Sigma Chi fraternity, for and to GOODFEI LOWS, Page 9, Col. B Brother Slayer Gets a Five Year Term, Suspended LUBBOCK, Dec. verdict f guilty of murder without malice fas returned by a 89th district court ury here Monday afternoon in the rial of Lee Tubbs, charged with the atal shooting Sept. 21 of his brother ack, 41, near the family residence. The Jury deliberated only six Inules and recommended a. five- ear suspended sentence. The state's only witness, Travis Vobs another brother, said that 'ter the shooting Lee Tubbs had !d him he Bad fired In self-de- nse. Two shots had been dls- largecl. Veteran Officer Is Shot Down By Four Who Were to Be Sentenced In Okemah Raid MUSKOOEE, Dec. four O'Malley gangiteri convicted of robbing Okemah 'i two national banki, broke jail today with an accom- plice, shooting' down and per- mortally wounding a vet- eran MuBkogee officer. Chief of Detectives Ben Bol. ton was shot in the face with a sawed-off chotgun from a dis- tance of nine feet. The fugitives sped north in a car taken from a Moskogee miniiter. A sixth federal prisoner, Henry Blackburn, held on a robbery conviction, was shot down as he fled with the others, recaptured and taken to a hospital. His condition was critical. At p. m. they were report- ed seen on highway 64, driving south. This highway leads to Forl Smith, Ark. One Fugitive Shot. Dan T. Heady, short, dapper gangster, WHS wounded In the back as he ran down an alley, but his as- sociates picked him up and took him along. The minister was thrown out of his car and left lr. the street. Bejtdea Heady, 'those escaplnc Dewey Gllmore. Fort Smith, Ark. Leonard Short, Galena, Mo. Russell Cooper, Fort Smith. Donny Jarrett, transient held un- der a Msnn act charge. Qllmore, Short, Cooper and Heady "ere awaiting sentence on convic- tions ot taking part In the simulta- neous robbery of the Okemah Na- tional and First National banks of Okemah In December 1934. They could have been given 41 years each on the robbery counts. Bolton was shot alter the gang; led by Cooper and Heady, opened See ESCAPE, 9, Col. 6 Two Slain In Break In Massachusetts Mason Man Shot During Holdup BRADY, Dec. O. Kel- ler of Mason was In a Brady hos- pital today suffering from a critical wound Inflicted In a. holdup here. Two negroes are under arrest a.t Haskell, charged with assault with Intent to murder. They were listed as Wlllard D. Nobles and Ida Rutli Griffin. Physicians said Keller gradually was becoming weaker. They had little hope for his recovery. Keller was reported to have lost H39 when he drove to the eastern part of Brady last week seeking a negro youth who had worked for him. WELBURN, 9, Col. 7 Four Year Voluntary Cotton A djustment Act Announced BOSTON, Dec. des- perate daylight break by five long- term convicts from Massachusetts' century-old state prison ended swlltly today with one prisoner and truck driver reported slain and another fugitive and three guards wounded. Within two hours, all the prison- breakers, were captured, dead or alive. While guards chased the escaped convicts along the Boston Maine railroad tracks toward Somervllle, the ancient penitentiary, situated within the shadows of Bunker Hill monument, echoed with the ham- mering of 900 riotous prisoners who were locked In their cells when the trouble broke out. Louis Richards of Somerville, driver of a truck which had Just de- livered potatoes to the prison, was reported to have had his skull bash- ed In with a bludgeon when the convicts commandered his truck. Prison officials said the prisoner slain was Philip Naples, 32, Worces- ter, sentenced last month to 16 to 20 years for robbei-y. Previously Police Superintendent Martin H. King mistakenly Identified the vic- tim as John Oliver, So.-ne.-ville. Seriously wounded was William P. See PEN BREAK, Paye 9, Col. 7 WEST TEXANS WIN CHICAGO, Dec. 3. Tex.i-s winners In the International grain and hay show today Included: Mllo snlin, Jr- Haskell. iecond; M. p. Vanner, Post, third; and R. D. Merchant, Haskell, llfth. WASHINGTON, Dec. Through a new four-year adjust- ment program, the AAA today ap- parently had provided Itself with a method of controlling cotton prod- uction In 1636 If the supreme court Invalidates the Bankheaci Colton Control act. Under the voluntary adjustment program announced today, cotton tcreage would be reduced at least 10 per cent from the base acreage f AAA experts his would result In a total crop of rom to bales, AAA officials 'iald regardless ol iijteome of the Bankhcad law court est they expected a large majority f cotton producers to Join In the oluntary program because It Is nked with another measure ol re- j lief for cotton farmers, the loan and subsidy payment. Under the loan agreement every farmer who receives the subsidy payment to bring his cash returns on cotton to 12 cents a pound must restrict hifi ccilon production according to pro- visions of the 1636 program. The AAA also disclosed that most of tho 1935 crop already has been sold and nearly every rotten pro- ducer has sold some, If not most of his cotton for less than 13 cents. The Mtton loan announcement provided for payment to producers of the difference between the RV- ernge sales price cotton on the day of sale and 12 cents a pound. Although this In the first time di- rect payments have been made to under a loan program, AAA officials said they expected nearly every farmer who Is eligible lor a payment to make application. AAA officials therefore feel that no Increase above the estimated maximum production will be pos- sible since farmers who fall to co- operate with tho program wou'.d be penalized by loss of their subsidy payments. AAA Administrator Chester C. Davis Is prepared to spend MO on the subsidies. DaMs said although the new plan broadly follows those of 1834 and 1035 Ihere were "Important chang- These were made in nn effort to simplify the program, to make It SM COTTON, Pace 10, Col. Abllena and cloud; Trllh local ralni lonljhl; Wcdneiiuy local nuns colder Weil of IMIh meridian Parity cloudy lonjjrht and Wednesday- slightly colder In Panhandle and In north portion Wednesday. Emu Eait o( 100th mtrtdlaji MoiMy cloudy will locil mm, n-inner In And extreme eait portion! tonight- Wednesday, loenl ralni, colder In north-iett and north central portions. JUlaUvo humidity   

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