Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Abilene Daily Reporter Newspaper Archive: December 2, 1935 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Abilene Daily Reporter

Location: Abilene, Texas

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Daily Reporter, The (Newspaper) - December 2, 1935, Abilene, Texas                               I MR AMI KOI P Wtyt "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES, WE SKETCH YOUR WURLD EXACTLY AS IT VOL. LV. Full Leased of Associated Press United Presi (UP) ABILENE, TEXAS, MONDAY, DECEMBER 2, TEN PAGES (Evening Edition of The Abflem Morning Nevn) NUMBER Hi Identify Body Of First Mrs. Coiner Ethiopia Masses Men To Attact Black Shirts BIG UTILITIES IGNORE NEW LAW Jesse Llvermore's Son Gun Victim Jesse Llvermore, Jr., 16, son of, the funoos Wall Street operator, wa> in a critical condition In a Los Angeles hospital with bullet wounds In his he.id and back, after he watt shot, officers said, by his mother, Mrs. Dorothea Livennore, divorced wife of the financier. Left (o right, JMSC Mrs. Llvermore. (Associated Press Mother Will Contend That Shooting Was An Accident SANTA BARBARA, Calif., Dec. 2. pneumonia add- ed a new handicap against Jesse Livermore, Jr., 16, today In his fight for life against the effects of a bul- let wound Inflicted by his mother. His condition was critical. His mother, Mrs. Dorothea Wendt Livermore Longcope, held In county Jail, faced a charge of assault with intent to kill. It will be changed to murder if he dies. Physicians placed young Liver- more under an oxygen tent period- ically to ease the strain on his punc- tured lung! Although apparently gaining strength earlier, he grew feverish as the night wore on and his temperature mounted. A bulletin issued by his physicians, Dr. Neville Ussher and Dr. Irving Wills, said "Temperature of 101.6 degrees and a pleural irr.'tation In the chest indicated pneumonia." The mother' will be brought Into court today. Because of the un- certainty of her son's condition District Attorney Percy Heckendorf nyni Miss Perkins Believes Gulf Port Strike Is To Be Settled HOUSTON, Dec. 2. (UP) Re- fusal of steamship operators to meet with the. federal dock strike medi- tation board was Secretary of Labor Prances Perkins said today, but she approved the board's decision for a private hear- ing. Miss Perkins arrived today from New Orleans and lectured on indus- trial relations.. She will leave here for San Antonio. "When we appoint a she said, "TO delegate all possible pow- er to that board. How, when, where or with whom a board meets must be decided by the board. The mem- bers are not judges. They are con- ciliators." She said Dr. George Stocking, chairman, Assistant Secretary of Hopson's Com- pany Among Those To File Suits WASHINGTON, Dec. 2 ffi Associated Gas and Electric corpo- ration, one of the biggest foes of the New Deal's utility law, was shown In a report received by the securities commission today to have Joined other holding companies in seeking to restrain the act's enforcement. First Word of Suit The suit was filed in Wilmington, but the commission's first word of It was the receipt of the bill of complaint today. The company asked the court to declare the act unconstitutional. The total of registered complaints was brought to 58 with the mine late yesterday of the Mission Oil company of Kansas City. Registra- tion was still possible although the the courts to decide the vast Issue. Later registration will be proper but such registrants faced a possi- bility that their activities may have been Illegal between Dec. 1 and the time of their actual registration. Howard C. Ropspn, a mainspring of The Associated qiilzwd at "length by trie senate lobby committee dur- ing passage of the holding company statute through congress. In the legal struggle between the administration and utilities, the wlnrier was not expected to be named for a year or more. Officials figured it would take that long for the courts to decide the vast Issue, which was formally Joined at mid- night last night. The New Deal's utility holding company law, passed last congres- sional session after the first engage- ment In the "war." provided that by last midnight the holding firms See UTILITIES, PC. Col. 3 British Cabinet Debates Oil Embargo; Italian Business Beginning To Feel Sanctons By the Associated Press. Indications that a possibly de- cisive battle may be immiueut New Nazi Decree Deals Deadly Blow To German Church WTUCO.DID NOT REGISTER Was Not Required Under Act, Campbell Explains The West Texas Utilities company Labor Edward F. McGrady and i dld not with the federal se- Frank P. Douglass, of the curltles commission as deadline un- had reported "progress" In efforts der the act arrived, because, explain- to settle the longshore dispute. ed_Prlce Campbell, president of She attributed the small number BERLIN, Dec. Kerrl, head of the national department of church affairs, dealt i. deadly blow to the Protestant Confessional Sy- nod today by depriving It of all authoritative and administrative rights. Kerrl's action followed his appli- cation yesterday of a censorship nn the confessional synod, preventing paston from sending communica- tions which have not been approved by him. The Rev. Martin Nlemoeller, an- were seen in a report to Addis nounclng he had been informed of Ababa that Ethiopian the censorship, said the churoli was soldiers were massed against being placed in "absolute the Italians in northern Ithio- tlon by the Etate- ASSOCIATED PRESS PROfi JAME5 H. BKEA5TER file temporary See BOYCOTT, 9, Col, 6 I probably will Mrs. Llvermore's attorney, Har- rison Ryon, Indicated the twice- divorced mother would plead that the shooting was accidental. "I have Just talked with Mrs. Livermore and guests at her house Ryon said. "It Is clear thotj Ihe discharge of the shot was purely accidental. Mrs. Llvermore hou no knowledge or suspicion that the gun was loaded." Jesse Livermore. Sr, the Wall Street operator, beyond a private talk v.-ith Heckendorf, refused to discuss the shooting. He was visibly nervous when informed his son's condition had taken a, critical turn. Shots Disperse Rioters In Cairo CAIRO, Dec. fired guns Into the air to disperse dem- onstrators and arrested four rioters who entered the home of the liberal leader, Mahmoud Pasha, and dam- aged furniture. Authorities attributed the trouble to dissatisfaction by the powerful nationalist Wdfd party over the fail- ure of the liberals to Join In a de- mand for Im-iedlate restoration of the 1923 constitution. Dallas Bribery Trial Is Begun DALLAS. Dec. of a jury began today for the trial of Tony Palumbo, former assistant district attorney charged with ac- cepting a bribe for protecting policy racket. Testimony was not expected to begin until tomorrow. WTTJCo., "registration was required only of holding companies, and we are an operating company only. We could not come under any part of the act except Title 2, which con- cerns Itself with operating utilities companies." The West Texas Utilities com- pany's holding company is the Mid- dle West corporation, now under supervision of the federal court aft- er emerging from receivership last week. The holding company act deals with electric utilities. The West See WTTJCo., 9, CoL 2 Dr. J. H. Breasted Victim of Very Strange Malady< NEW YORK. Dec. James H. Breasted, noted archeolo- glst and head of the Oriental Insti- tute of the University of Chicago, died early today at the Presbyterian medical center. Hospital authoritls, in announcing th death of the scientist, maintain- ed the same secrecy as to the cause of death as they had con- cerning his strange illness. Dr. Breasted was stricken last week aboard the liner Conte Dl Savsla en route back to the United States. His illness was first diag- nosed as tropical malaria, but later it was said he was suffering from an undetermined malady. The archeologlst was one of the discoverers of the tomb of Kinz Tut Ankhamen on whose walls were engraved the words: "Death" shall come on swift wings to him that toucheth the tomb of Pharaoh." Dr. Breasted, had fre- quently ridiculed this curse. At the hospital, it was said the family of the scientist would Issue a complete bulletin of the Illness and death later today. Dr. Breasted was 70 years old, a native of Rockford, HI. A graduate of Northwestern uni- versity, class of 1688, he began his professional career as an assistant in Egyptology at the University of See BREASTED, Tf. 9, Ct.1. 7 pia. This report said Has Seyoum and Ras Kassa, two of Ethio- pia's leading generals, had com- bined their forces for a. general offensive against the Italian troops which have pushed far south of their bases of supply. Emperor Nearby Emperor Halle Selassie was at Dessye, not far south of the troop concentration and Ethiopian sources thought It llkelv that the emperor has established hia headquarters at a position to be close to the scene of combat. Italian business leaders said League of Nations sanctions were causing a slackening of trade and that labor aqd credit problems were developing. They stateS'that If Italy's normal Import and export business of lire (about a month were cut in half, the reduc- tion would be emUvalent to the monthly wages of men. The British cabinet debated to- day the problem of tightening the iron ring of sanctions Imposed on Italy for Initiating a war of occu- pation in Ethiopia. Talk of peace in East Africa, the purpose for which sanctions were Imposed, languished as Britain's at- tention turned to on oil embargo to freeze that nation Into submission to the will of her sister states In the league of nations. "Mobilize" Women Premier Mussolini at the same time took steps to "mobilize" the women of the Fascist domain for a finish fight against the penalties. A two-fold 'problem was before the British, leader in the sanctions drive: 1. Should an embargo on oil ship- ments to Italy be imposed at Ge- neva? Commentators little doubted the cabinet would approve the move and transmit its decision to the league. 2. If the embargo goes Into ef- fect, and Italy makes good her See WAR, fg. 9, Col. 7 Kerrl had warned Nov. 33 that he would dissolve the confessional sy- nod today If It did not co-operate with his church committee. The confessional group asked for eight days In which to answer Kerrl's ultimatum. Although today's decree did not mention jpeclflcally the prctestant confessional synod, the right of church taxation, collection of funds and convocation of synods was for- bidden to the opposition groups. Nazi church officials, appointed by Kerrl's edict of Sept. 24, were given full authority. "No 'other church unions groups are permitted to execute church authority or the decree said. The opposition groups were pro- hibited from nominating ministers and assisting the clergy In nomina- tion and examination of candidates They were barred from making an- nouncements from the pulpit. j Little Girl Drowns In Yard Fish Pond Cite Evidence of Business Uplift WASHINGTON, Dec. A sharp decline in Industrial loan applications to the reconstruction finance corporation was cited by Chairman Jesse H. Jones today as of business Improvement. NORTHTEXAS Abilene Has Low of Twenty (Vine Degrees By the Associated Press Freezing temperatures, with kill- Ing frost in places, hit North Texas today. It was down to 28 at Amarlllo nnd other Panhandle points, while Abi- lene hod a low of 29. Dallas re- ported a minimum of 31 and Pales- tine 28. Sherman likewise had a low of 28. Most of the state was clear, except for cloudy conditions around H Paso, .22 of an inch rain at Browns- ville and overcast skies In the nil Rio section. The mercury dropped to 48 at Del Bio, 40 at El Paso, 52 at Corpus 40 at Austin, 42 at Houston and 64 at Brownsville. To the north, Oklahoma City felt the sting of 26-degrcc weather. FREEZING IN TWO GUNMEN PUT TO DEATH DALLAS, Dec. Johnson, 14-month-old daugh- ter of Mr. anci Mrs. O. H. Johnson, was drowned yesterday In a fish pond at her home. The child, who was In the beck yard with her fath- er, strayed from his side and her mother Inquired about her, found the baby face down in the pond. Resuscitation efforts were unavailing. Farrell and Wiley Last Mais-Legenza Gang BELLFONTE, Pa., Dec. (UP youths who tried to prolong the Capone distinction in the un- doublecrosslng and cold were electrocuted today In state prison. Martin 38, and Frnncis Wiley, 27, died six minutes apart, and with them died the notorious Mals-Lcgenza. gang which terrorized the eastern seaboard from Rich- mond, Va., to New York. The crime for which they forfeit- ed their lives was the kidnaping and killing of Big Bill Weiss, Phlladel- phla underworld figure. Robert Mais f-f and Gsorge begenza also participat- ed In Weiss' rrurder but months apo Abllenn and Fair freezing tonight; Tueiday partly cloudy wHU slowly rlilng temperature. West West of 100th meridian Fair, frost in ioulheo.iL iwrtlon tonight: Tuesday fair, ilowly rising temperature In north and east portion; Te: Eaflt of lOOlh meridian Second Trial On For Beaie Murder EDINBURG, Dec. ments were started today In the case of John Parks. Mercedes po- liceman, on R charge of slaying Frank Beale as his trial entered the third week. Pnrks was accused of shooting Bealc lost April after an argument In a. cold drink stand. A previous trial ended with Jury In disagreement. the Special Mexican Officer Says He Fired To Defend Self As the 'aftermath of thl fatal shooting of Abundlo Ramirez, Mex- ican, on a street near the city cem- etery early Sunday night, John Ol- gin, special Mexican officer, was charged with murder Monday morn- ing in Justice Lindsay P. Walden's court. Ramirez was shot once, through the head, (ailing dead In the street. There were no witnesses to the shooting. At the examining trial, Olgln tes- tified he shot Ramirez In self de- fense, after the man had advanced on him with a drawn butcher knife. Olgin'a bond was set at Olgln appeared at the police sta- tion about Sunday night to re- port the shooting. Later, in a sign- ed statement made to County At- torney Esco Walter, he said that he and Ramirez had trouble during the local celebration ol Mexico's Inde- pendence from Spain, last Septem- ber'15 and 16. While not a regular officer, Olgln is deputized for special service during the celebrations to assist In keeping order in the Mex- See SHOOTING, Tg. 9, Col. I Famous Woman Educator Dies PHILADELPHIA, Dec. MIssM. Carey Thomas president em- eritus of Bryn Mawr college and one of the best known woman educators In the country, died today. She was 19. Miss Thomas was associated with Bryn Mawr since Its founding in 1885 and was Its second president. She retired from active college work In 1922 and that year was elected president emeritus. Designed To Maintain Balance Between Pro- ducer, Consumer WASHINGTON, Dec. A 1B39-37 born-hog adjustment pro- gram, designed to maintain a bal- ance between producer and con- sumer Interests, was Announced to- day by Henry A. Wallace, secretary of agriculture. The new plan proposes to permit 30 per cent Increase In hog pro auction next year over 1935, pre- paring the ;vay for possible reduc- rlons In pork prices, and to restrict corn acreage to, about acres, an Increase of about acres over the amount harvested this year. The bureau of agricultural eco- lomics reported results of a survey showing that AAA processing taxes either had. been passed on to the consumer or had been paid Indirect- y by the former who received lower Drlces for his product. Simultaneously, the American Liberty League attacked the new deal farm program as regimenting armers and creating e. "definite challenge to the American form of government." Under the new adjustment pro- gram a corn acreage base and a market hog base will be fixed after See AAA, Pg. 9, Col. S Says Landon Will Be GOP Nominee TOPEKA, Kan., Dec. Charles Curtis, former vice-presi- dent, predicted here today that Gov. Alt M. Landon of Kansas will win he presidential nomination. Curtis, who arrived yeskrday from Washington, admitted he was here In the Interests of Landon's candidacy. He added that senator Wlllla m E. Borah o[ Idaho would be a candidate. MYSTERY FOB Investigators and Family Convinced Case ed; Hitch Hiker's Sec- ond Wife Also Missing KANSAS CITY, Dec. young expectant mother found shot to death along -a roadside near hen more than a year-ago wai the missing first wife of Chester Comer, slain Oklahoma bitch, hiker inspected of murdering eight other missing personi. Mystery Solved Solution to Oils mystery murder1 was announced today by Jack B. Jenkins, acting chief of detectives of the Kansas City, Kans., police de- partment. Jenkins, who has worked unceas- ingly on the case since Oct. 6, 1934, when the bullet pierced body of young woman was found beside a Wyandotte county lane, said iden- tification was positive and had been effected by comparison of teeth, scars end clothing of the murder victim to those of Comer's first wife. Previously, the body of the young woman had been Identified a scon of times but In each .instance the Identification proved erroneous. More than had viewed the body In a morgue and later In a cemetery vault In an attempt to Identify It. Comer, Itinerant laborer, was mortally wounded a week ago by a constable near Blanchard, Okla. Ho dleipft ate.pMahoma pity hospital WeqjiesHBy -night wlttiout making a coherent'statement. He was shot while a statewide search was In progress for him in connection with the disappearance of Ray Evans, Bhawnee attorney, L. A. Simpson, Piedmont, Okla., farmer, and Simp- son's son. Warren. Second Wife Missing Subsequently it was determined that Comer's first wife, Mrs. Eliza- beth Chllders Comer, arid his sec- ond wife, whom he had married without obtaining a divorce from his first mate, were missing. Then detectives determined that circumstances indicated comer See COMER, Pf. 9, Col. 4 AS RESULT OF MISHAPS HERE Negro Boy Has Bullet Wound In Face; Mexican In Automobile Wreck Centennial Radio Round-UpTo Be Broadcast From Abilene am Nprt Monriav Nioht dlll HtM mUHUcty my' To Be Produced Publicly At the Paramount portion us (roil to eoiui lonittit; Tun- TemperiiturM Mon tm. Contlnued. cold was forecast for I they were electrocuted at Richmond, Texas tonight. for another murder. Probably the biggest radio broad- rHI I cast ever staged in West Texas will be held Monday night, December 9, when the "Texan Centennial Radio Round-Up" Is produced publicly In Abilene and transmitted over a state-wide network. Texas Centennial officials an- nounced today that the regular schedule of Monday night programs originating In Fort Worth, San An- tonlo, Dallas, and Houston interrupted for this special vlll be event. and the program for Monday night. December 9, will originate In Abi- lene, b? picked up by WBAP In Fort Worth by remote control, and ce transmitted over the Texas Quality J''. I Network. iis Every effort Is being turned To Be Free; Outstanding Radio Talent to Appear Before "Mike" make the "Radio Round-Up" the most significant event In the history of Wesi Texas airwaves. The Cow- boy band famous musical aggre- gallon of Hardln-Simmons univer- sity, will play their most spirited j numbers. Two West Texas news- which will be held from until p. m. on the stage of the Paramount theater In downtown Abilene. Theater officials have A negro and a Mexican were near deatli at noon Monday at the West Texas Baptist sanitarium as the re- iult of Sunday accidents here. The negro, Charlie Wheeler, shine )oy at a local shoe shop, had a bullet wound through the face. He was shot about 9 o'clock Sunday morning when a gun he had hand- ed to L. D. Sims, another negro, discharged accldently. A Mexican man, whose name could not be learned, has a crushed skull. He was expected to live only a few hours. With three other Mexican cotton pickers, he was en route to Abilene when their auto- j mobile overturned about 6 miles south of Anson on highway 4-30. One other man, who received lacera- tions on the face and head, was dis- charged from the hospital after emergency treatment. Wheeler was shot on Plum street, between Sixth and Seventh streets. When he handed his gun to Sims, he said he did not know the ham- mer was back. A bullet struck him high on the left check and came out on the other side of his head. pupermen, Rufus Hlggs, editor of the Stephenvllle Empire-Tribune, and Henderson Shuffler, editor of the Odessa News-Times, will deliv- er brief addresses describing the vi- tal part West Texas will play In the forthcoming Texas Centennial cele- brations. will also appear on the program, the radio department of the Texas cen- tennial state organization an- nounced here. Further details will be forthcoming later, as carefully conducted rehearsals arc under- gone throughout the week remain- ing before the broadcast. The radio progrnm will be pro- duced as an entertaining stage show agreed to alter their schedule on the day In order that the last show will be concluded by when the theater -doors will be thrown open to the public. Admission to the big Other outstanding radio talent broadcast will be free after that hour, the people of West Texas be- ing cordially Invited to be guests 01 the Texas Centennial celebrations. The "Texas Centennial Radio Round-Up" la being painstakingly produced by the slate publicity de- partment in .fui of Its pro- gram to emphasize the Texas Cen- tcnnlM as a project state-wide In every particular. See ACCIDENTS, Pj- 9, Col. 8 Dallas Youth Is Killed On Hunt DALLAS, Dec. 2. WaBstaft, 15-year-old high school student, was killed yesterday when he was struck In the head by the charge of n 22-callbrc rifle from the hands of Robert Ferguson, nil 13- ycar-old hunting companion, who was stalking a bird, raised his head from a hollow in front of Ferguson Just as the boy tired. The bullet entered the side of his hcud and came out after- ranging through it portion of nil brain,   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication