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   Abilene Daily Reporter, The (Newspaper) - November 22, 1935, Abilene, Texas                               iFAIR gftflene "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES. WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES" -Byron flON VOL. LV. Full Leased Wires cf Associated Press United Press (UP) ABILENE, TEXAS. FRIDAY. NOVEMBER SIXTEEN PAGES (Evening Edition of The Abilene Morning Newt) NUMBER 140 M'DONALD DRAWS REPRIMAND Shippers Urged Not To Carry War Supplies LAVA MENACING HILO, HAWAII [ERUPTS Nurse Kidnaps Beloved Baby Mrs. Stella Culling, IT, was held at Oakland, Calif., on a charge of kidnaping after James Fox, 2% years old stoler y three months ago from Fhcenix, Ariz., was found in a gypsy cainp al f Oakland. The girl, employed as the child's nursemaid, said she de- cided lo run away with Pete Jones, held with her, but "couldn't bi to leave the baby." (Associated Press Photo.) Allocations For Westex Roads Trial On Statutory Charge To Reach The Jury Today Special to the Reporter. BAIRD, Nov. case o: Page Roeketfc, 19, on trial In 42nd district court here on a statutorv charge, was expected to reach the Jury by 3 p. in. Friday. The charge to the Jury was read by Judge Mil- burn S. Long at after both sides had rested, and arguments were underway when the court re- cessed for neon. The state moved swiftly in the .trial of Rockett. who Is charged yVlth criminal assault on a 16-year- Cross Plains girl. The offense allegedly was committed on Satur- day night. November 9, this year. Prosecution was completed at a. m. Friday, and the defense testimony was heard during two hours, wltnesseE including the de- fendant himself. Five Jurors were selected Thurs- day afternoon to complete the panel and testimony of a dozen witnesses, Including the prosecuting witness and her mother, was presented. Dis- trict Attorney J R. Black said the state would rest this morning after tfctimony of P few more witnesses. P. E. Mitchell, Callahan county at- torney, is assisting In the prosecu- tion. Tlie young girl testified she was assaulted after she was forced to drive with Rocte-tt and another youth, J. D. Taylor, also of Pioneer, a short distance from Cross Plains. Rockett entered a car In which she was sitting with Tnylor on a down- town street In Cross Plains, she said Sec TRIAL, 16, Col. 4 Present Highway 89 to Be- come Number.! When It Is Surfaced Orders and appropriations many West Texas counties came from the state highway commls- sionVThm-sday; also announcemehl of aJPextenslve re-routing program Involving highways Nos. 1, 15, 89 anc 120. Under the commission's order the present highway 89 cut-off from Weatherford to the intersection east of Ranger will become highway part of the coast to coast but not 'until the 45-mile cut-off has been surfaced. Grades and bridges were completed a year ago. Highway 1's alternate, No. 1-A, is now highway 15 all the way to the New Mexico border, new numbers Having been placed; the 1-A desig- nation now being confined to th 25-mile stretch from Abilene to the lilltop west of Albany. Later it probably will be given another num- ber. Over-Run Orders. The commission authorized a 000 appropriation for grading, base and surface work on highway 4 Sec ROADS, Page 16, Col, 5 Molten Mass Only Fifteen Miles From Town and Moving Rapidly HILO, T. H., Nov. ing at unusual speed, two streams of fiery lava from Mokuaweoweo, sec- ond largest active volcano in the world, advanced steadily on Hilo and''the Kona coast today. At ajn. the northeast stream, threatening Hilo, was only 25 miles rom the city. It hod-moved 15 miles In less than 24 hours. The lava tide washing down the ither slope, toward the Kona coast, lad traveled an equal distance. The U. S. S. Tiger on the coast guard service was ordered to stand jy for emergency evacuation of the ity and of villages along the coast >f of Hawaii, largest is- and of the Mid-Pacific group. Mobile Foresters All available deputies of the U. S orestry service were mobilized Jo he emergency. The Kona flow appeared certain cut off the government road o hat side of -historic Mauna Lo At present the lava, which had pread of five" mlleS'In width befor split into two streams, is workin way relentlessly through fores reas. Not since 1899 when an eruptlor f the crater washed a lava river t within Ihree of Hilo has th anger to .the city been so ereat. In the path was the Walluku rlv r, source of Hllo's water supply. Old residents said the flow wa he greatest within their experience It was the first time since 192 Pioneer Dies J. T. Howard, pioneer of Taylor county and for six years tai assessor, died Friday afternoon al hi] home, 1018 North 18th street. IIY'STlnT OP See VOLCANO, Page 15, Col. 8 Roscoe Streets Will Be Paved ROSCOE, Nov. Pav ng of streets and construction o: dewalks In Roscoe will start here Monday with works progress admin- trntlon funds totaling siip- lemented by furnished by ponsors. Twenty-nine men will be used on he project. The streets will have allche base with double bituminous urfacc. Accidental Shot Hits Negro Boy Condition of Bruce Johnson, 10- ear-old negro boy, who was serl- usly hurt by an accidental charge om a sun Thursday night, was re- rted as unchanged today at the est Texas Baptist hospital. A bullet from a .22 rifle in the -nds of his uncle. C. S. McGec, severed an artery in Ills neck, le shooting was accidental, offl- rs said. Hobbs Community Will Get ScSiool ROSY, Nov. will start next Wednesday en a new four-room brick and lllc school building for the Hobbs community In Fisher county. Labor win ae furnished by sp- 35 men from relief rolls. WPA expenditure will agKregatc sponsors furnishing 166.68. Far And Middle West Are Leading as Weather Turns Colder NEW YORK, Nov. all trade gathered momentum this eek as the weather turned colder, Dun Bradstreet said today. "With the far west and middle west leading, volume of retail sales rose 2 to 5 per cent from the level of the weel: preceding, for the coun- try as a whole, but the compara- tive with the 1934 total placed the range of the estimate from a loss to an Increase of 7 per cent, due lo the steady rise In sales durlrg thai period. "As the result of the spurt In re- tail sales over the week-end, when temperatures dropped .suddenly, nearly nil branches of the wholesale market were busier than See TRADE, Pafe IS, CoL 8 Pioneer Was 'hf One Time Ccunty Tax' Assessor" J. T. Howard, 76, pioneer of this area and for six years tax assessor of Taylor county, died unexpectedly Cross Pacific Air Mai Service Will Be Inaugurated ALAMEDA, Calif., Nov. America's air mail will start bridg- ng the Pacific today. Amid International ceremonies, the 25-ton China Clipper will soar through the tfolden Gate late to- day (about.6 p. m. c. S. T.) to in- augurate the Pan-American Air- ways flylne Mrvlce to Hawaii and the Philippines. Wings across the sea will reach Honolulu In 18 hours, and Manila In 60 hours flying time. Climaxing oratory, and festivities, the great seaplane will soar from San I'ranclsco Bay 'or Honolulu, miles away, lan- en with two Ions of mall. No pas- sengers will be carried. Postmaster General James A See CLIPPER, 15, CoL 1 at p.m. Friday at the family residence, 1041 North Eighteenth street. While In ill health for several months, Mr. Howard was up and about his house and _vard Thursday and was apparently feeling better than usual. However, he became ill shortly after breakfast Friday mom- ng, nnd suffered a heart attack shortly before noon. He died a few minutes after a physician arrived nt -he home. Funeral arrangements are pending the arrival of several of his chil- dren, but plans will be announced atsr today from the Kiker-Knight mortuary. A native of Tennessee, Mr. How- ard came to Taylor county in 1902, and for IB years lived in Merkel, where he was connected with the Farmers Merchants National lank. Moving to Abilene in 1924, le served for three terms as county ax assessor. He was a deacon in he South Side Baptist church nnd ad been a Mason for more than 0 years. Mrs. Howard died a number of ears ago. Eight children survive. They are Mrs. R. W. Orisham, So- hin, Ruth and Dixie Howard, Abl- ;ne; Dr. George W. Howard, Dal- as: Mrs. J. T. Mlddleton, O'Con- !ll; Mrs. Henry Weldon, Carlsbad, M.; and L. B. Howard, Vemou. Leaves Texas Port With Cargo of Oil For Italy U. S. Classed With Other Sanctionist Countries; First "Real Fighting" of War Reported By Associated Press. Application by the United States government of financial pressure to enforce its embargo against trade with Italy and Ethiopia was indicated in Washington today. Italian authorities expressed resentment at the American ac- tion and said the United States had brought itcelf almost into the category of a "sanctions" nation. Italy has formulated a program..of economic reprisal against such nations. Italy Angered The Indications In Washington were that federal agencies were re- fusing to extend notes they hold from shipping companies when such companies'violate the admlnlstra tlon's Instructions against trading with The jilted itsell In the llne'bf fire from Italian repris- als against "sanctions" countries to- day. As the "first real fighting on any scale since the war began" was're- ported from the Ethiopian Addis Abnba, fascists in Rome ex- Pressed open suspicion of the call Is- sued 'on the American oil industry by the Washington government to See WAR, rase 15, Col. 4 'Mercy Dr. A. M. Wairmer, 80. was said by the Bridgeport Post and Telegram to have related ht committed a "mercy slaylnf1 48 years ago In Ncrth BrocLfleld, Mass. He said he guve an over- dose of drug to a men badly wounded by a shotgun charge. (Associated Press Photo.) Negro Docker and Taxi Driver Dead PORT ARTHUR, Nov. 22. Two negroes, one a non-union dock worker, were dead today of Injuries received when shot from ambush late Wednesday night os th3y start- ed In a taxlcab for a shipping dock. They were Ed Hill, an Independ- ent dock worker, and Harvey Polite, taxi driver, were fired on by as- sassins as Hill started to get into Polite's taxi at Hill's house. Police chief H. F, Baker Jailed 12 suspects today but officers declined to say whether the shootlnRS wfire connected with the bloody strike of International Longshoremen's As- sociation members. Woman Confesses; Peace Justice In Oklahoma Faces Charges AHNETT, Okla., Nov. m Solution of a 28-year-old murder mystery was announced today by County Attorney C. B. fol- lowing the purported confession of a woman in Death Volley, Cnllf., and the arrest of C. E. Farmer, Jus- tice of the peace at Lavcrnc.- Charges Filed. Leedey said murder charges were 'lied against Farmer after recelDt of a letter from Mrs. Bonnie Lov- all, the Death Valley woman, set- forth details of the 28-ycai- old crime. He said the woman wrole she was present In Shalluck the night Ed Nelson was slain and his body lidden in underbrush on the banks if Wolf creek. "According to her letter, nnd other ividence we have unearthed, Ncl- on had lost several thousand dot- See MYSTERY, Page 15, Col. Z No Further Action To Be Taken; "Should Have Been He Declares AUSTIN, Nov. A reprimand for Agricultural Commissioner J. E. McDonald was ordered by the Texos house 3f representatives today rather than preferring impeachment jharges. The vote for reprimanding resolution was 73 ayes to BB noes. Adopted by The recommendation of the com- mittee of the whole was formally re- ported to the house and adopted as the house action by 87 ayes to 44 noes, McDonald, seated beside his re- cent bride end two sons, at the front of the house of representa- tlvas, was immediately congratulat- ed by friends. "I have done no wrong. I have worked night nnd day. I should have been exonerated. That is McDonald said. Tlie house adjourned sine die. The hearing and tv.-o special ses- sions kept members ti Austin nine weeks. No further action will be taken as the resolution provided that Its adoption should constitute In Itself a censure and reprimand. In.I substance, .the'; Viouse ustilitofiUlnrttliM iiLiond department were or Jack of understanding of his of- ficial duties, or lack of recognition of the dignity of his official posi- tion, or lack of diligence In per- formance of his Before adopting the resolution, ihe committee of the whole had re- fused to adopt a substitute which omitted a reprimand. The defeated resolution merely found that there had been nothing found to warrant charges of impeachment. Ten Articles. The committee had heard testl- co MCDONALD, rage is, col. a New Jersey May Execute Sixteen Year Old Killer MOUNT HOLLY. N. J, Nor. M-IUP) Unless hither co.fi. intervene. New Jersey nM exe- cute a 16-year-old boy for war- der. Jacob Ciemlengo, a farm hand, stood before Judge Frank A. Hen- drickson last and heard blnuclf condemned (o the chair.. With him was sentenced H. Hildebrand, 26. They killed Thomas Eller..63, a poultry farm- fir. Both were aid by police to have confessed, mftng they had seen Eller with a large roll of banknotes. Special Venire Is Called; Charged In Death of; Cisco Rancher EASTLAND, Nov. nis, trlct Judge B. W. Pf.tterson has pr- dered a special venire of 75'for ins trial Dec. 5 ot Miss Mary Lou How- cll, charged with slaylns Cisco rancher, Aug. "ii 1934. Miss Howell will be the gecpnd person to be tried In connection wlttl Threat's death. Clifford was give a a death cenethce at EasUand last December.. .Bis case Is appial. 'Srobbery- charge in-connsitlon. slaying, Miss aud Dosutft JIS yevi at Balrd last year. Elmer Vahcleave, co-defendant in tbff case, has not been tried. Ha' testified for the state at Doggett'l trial on the robbery count at Balrd, Case of Johnson Rests With Jury BIG SPRING, Nov. iase of John Johnson, Lynn county lepuly sheriff charged with glnylng B. O. Best, was In the hands of dts- rlct court jury today. The case reached the Jury early ast night. Johnson pleaded self-defense. The tate did not seek the death pen- Ity- Best was shot to death near La- icsa. COLLEGES ALL SET FOR ANNUAL HOMECOMINGS CORPUS CHRfSTI, Nov. The Pensilvanla, Italian tanker, sailed from here Thursday wll.h barrels of crude oil for the Italian fleet In the Mediterranean. It had picked up barren previously in Port Isabel. The shipment completed a con- tract entered Into several monlhs ago before" the United States gov- ernment frowned on commerce with belllgerenU In the Italo-Bthloplan war. The Pensylvania is a- converted cargo vessel recently taken from a- shipyard in Genoa and pressed Into the oil carrying service. She was In such condition on her voy- age from Genoa that she had to DC towed several hundred mile.1.. New McMurry President, Dr Tom Brabham, To Be Formally Presented New York Port Strike Is Settled NEW YORK, Nov. longshoremen's strike against the United Fruit Company lines was called off today when four hundred members of the International Long- shoremen's Association agreed to return to work pending a meeting Tuesday for final Eey.lcment. Stones flew carl'.er In the clay In nn outbreak of violence among the picket lines at Ihc piers, but no one was Injured. Entertainment for hundreds of visitors has been arranged at Mc- Murry college, Saturday. Not only Is the school staging Its seventh an- nual homecoming for ex-students mothers and dads, but a new pres- W. Brabham of Fort to be formally pre- sented. In his honor and in tribute to others who have been leaders In the 13 years of the school's history, the homecoming has been designated as "President's Day." Dr. Cluster Q. Smith, who leaves McMurry on December 1 to become vice-president of Southern Methodist university, Dallas, will also be hon- ored, as the retiring president. Other special guests for the day will be Mayor C. L. Johnson of Abi- lene, and the present anil past presi- dents' of the Alumn! Ex-Stu- dents association, the Five Hundred club, the Mothers and Dads club, the board of trustees of the college. Ellis Locke of Miami lb the presi- dent of the alumni association this year. Others who have held this of- fice are Mrs. H. Leo Tucker1 (Lela Mae the first woman grad- uate of McMurry; H. Leo Tucker, J. Arlin Gamer, Wiley Caffcy, Abilene; Morris Hodges, Dallas; Howard Mil- Sec McMURKV, Paie 10, Col. 4 New President Dr. Tom W. Ilrabham of J'ort Worth will be formally present- ed Saturday morning at o'clock as (he new president of MrMurry iollcge. He smTCrds Dr. Cluslor Q. Smith, who brconics vice pres- ident of .Southern Methodist un- iversity on December I. Dr. Brab- ham hcs bmi named guest nf honor for McMurry's seventh annual homecoming. Bonfire And Pep Rally To- night to Launch ACC Activities The largest homecoming In the history of Abilene Christian college will be launched at 8 o'clock tonight with a bonfire find pep rally. With fair weather prevailing Saturday school officials expect between and guests to be present at the general assembly Saturday morning ;it 10 o'clock. The occasion for the homecoming is the annvial McMurry-A. C- C football gome at Saturday aft- ernoon at the Abilene high school stadium, the clash ulso marked by the 1035 homecoming of McMurry college. Tonight's program will be under direction of J. W. Roberts and Earl McCflleb, officers of. tne freshman class; Norvcl Young, president of the students' association, and Morris HoK'flrd, clicer leader. The pep ral- ly progi am will be staged In Sewell auditorium, following the bonfire, dle Cnrruthers, president of the Kitten Klub, will asiist with the celebration. lJwinR tlie general program Saturday morning, the annual con- vention of the Ex-Students assocla- lon will be hold nt o'clock. A biirbccuc for ell ex-studcnU and rlcndj of the school will be held at Carelessness Blamed for Baking Soda Deaths In San Francisco SAN FRANCISCO. Nov. A full barrel of deadly poison was re- ported today by Dr. J. C. Gelger, city health director, to have been mixed with baking soda sold at bar- Rain prices to hundreds of San Francisco housewives. A department store employe's carelessness. Dr. Gelger said, may have been responsible for Introduc- tion of the poison Into the soda. At least three deaths have been at- tributed to the poisoned kitchen, staple. The health director said the dis- covery was made when the store owner turned over to the health de- partment one of three empty bar- rels of "baking soda" the store had sold in bulk form during the past month. He explained that an employe hnd Informed him that two display barrels were refilled, as their con- tents were sold, from this barrel. Dr. Geiger said a few pounds of powdered substance In the bottom of the barrel was virtually pure less active of the two found In the contaminated baking soda. On the outside of the barrel the Sec POISON, Page 15, Col. 1 Abilene and (air and llRhtly wnrnier tonight; StUirday, purlly cloudy and warmer- West of 100th merldlui Fnlr, illRhlly warmer In north anfl casl ml portions lonlght; Saiurrtay, fair, warmer. East East of 100th meridian- Fair, Hllfihtly wnrmcr In northwesi por- ton, froal In norinenst portion ami near See A. C. rage 16> Col. 5 Dry thflrmfimrlpr Wet Uiermometor iHelitlve Humidity   

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