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Abilene Daily Reporter: Wednesday, November 20, 1935 - Page 1

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   Abilene Daily Reporter, The (Newspaper) - November 20, 1935, Abilene, Texas                               FAIR "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS Oh FOES, WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT VOL. LV. Fufl Leased Wires of Auwlated Press Untttd Pmt (UP) ABILENE, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 20, 1935- FOURTEEN PAGES (Evening EdHteB of The AbBent Memlni NUMBER HI mns First Conviction Here Under New State Liquor Law JAPAN POSTPONES CHINA DRIVE Harlow Halo It's a, tricky millinery creation Ibat tops the new style locks of Jean Harlow, still easily recot- nizable by flicker fans despite the passing ot her platinum tresses. A And even the most critical of will concede that the of the "halo I and new brown shade of hair Is I becoming to the film star, shown lunching In Los Angeles. Lynn County Deputy Is Charged In Slaying of B. C. Best BIG tetsimony of character witnesses, called In an effort to prove B. O. Best's reputation was bad, was heard today In the trial of John Johnson, Lynn county deputy sher- iff, for the killing of Best. The killing occurred May seven miles North of Lameso, Bill Hanks of OTJonnell, testifi- ed that on one occasion Best knock- ed him unconscious for "whistling and pigging" at a dance. He ad- mitted on cross-examination by the state that he had been drinking. Dalton Barnhart, who was with Johnson at the time of the shoot- ing, said they were "flagged down" on the Lamesa-O'Donnell highway B. C. Best, Grady Best and Ha- Psel Hancock. "There is the he quoted B C Best as saying. "Lst's get him out. you I'll teach you to accuse me of stealing calves." Barnhart said Johnson told the Bests leave them alone and that they were on their way to Lamesa to see Gus White (Dawson B. C. Best was quoted as replying then, according to Barnhart: "Johnson, you what are you doing down in Dawson B. C. Best kept pulling and twist- ing Johnson's leg In an effort to get him out of the car, Barnhart testified. It was then that the shot was .fired. Bamhart said he was extremely "scarred" and would not accom- pany the Bests to a Lamesa hospi- tal, as requested by Johnson. George Dupree, spjclal prosecu- tor, laid emphasis on how "fright- ened" the witness was at the time. He subjected Barnhart to severe cross-examination on the position of B. C. Best when shot and sought to bring out that no aid was offered thf; wounded man. Johnson was expected to testify later In the trial. Tokyo and Nanking eminent Representa- tives Negotiating FEIPING, Nov. ration of an autonomous state in Northern China, demanded by Japan under threat of Invasion, WAS postponed today under mysterious circumstances. Army Leaders Angry Japanese army authorities were reported angry, at the delay. Maj. Gen Kenjl Dolhara, chief of intel- ligence of the army on the Asian Mainland, flew'to Tientsin to con- sult with Chinese leaders. Gen. Hsiao Cheng-Ylng, of the Chinese army council here, said the delay was due to a peremptory or- der' Tram Chiang Kai-Shek, gener- alissimo of the Chinese army, and the country's strongest man. Chiang's reported order came just before the tatively set for declaration of an autonomous state. To back-up its demand for the state the Japanese army was pre- pared to be ready to move II divi- sions of troops" into the great ter- ritory t provinces ol Jlopel, Shantung, Shansl vrnlch-4iave a -popu- JSflM.OOO. peopil and con- cHtute' the heart of northern china. One division was at Shanhalkwah, 150 miles up the const from Tlent- slln on the main Tientsin-Mukden (Manchukuo) railway. Nominally the northern. Chinese states whose autonomy Is to be De- clared would be under the sover- eignty of the central- Chinese gov- ernment whose capital Is at Nan- king, up the Yantfze river from Shanghai. Actually It would be practically Independent of China and under the close tutelage of the Japan army. Would Be Buffer Slate It would form still another buffer addition to between China-and Soviet Russia. nation whoss future policies and actions most Intimately concern Ja- pan. For surface purposes It is indicat- ed that when the autonomous state declared, !t will maintain rela- tions with the central government in about the same manner as does the southern semi-independent See SINO-JAPS, .Pg. 13, Col. 1 Centenary Game Dropped From '36 U of T Schedule TO NAME 20 CARDINALS A) VATICAN CITY, NOV. 20 WV- Vope Plus today officially convoked a secret consistory for Dec. 16 at which he may name as many as 20 cardinals and 12 bishops. A public consistory probably will be held three days later for tho Investiture of the new cArdlnelo. AUSTIN, Nov. OUe, }uslness manager of athletics at the University of Texas, has announced that Centenary college of Shreve- port, would be dropped from Texas' 936 football schedule. The Centenary date, Oct. 17, has tentatively accepted by Baylor, Olle said, adding that he was reas- onably certain Arkansas would be played Nov. 20. The only other open date Is Sept. 26. Jafsie SaysBruno Ready To Confess Par tin Kidnaping Morgan Flays Tax Increases NEW YORK, Nov. Increasing taxes and -govern- mental expenditures. In the opinion of J. P. Morgan, the fi- nancier, threaten to tripe out the gnat private fortunes of toll country within 30 yean nnlesa a retrenchment policy li adopt- ed. "Why, even now. anybody who makes any money In the United States actually- li working eight months of the year for the gov- ernment, and who fa going to be able to or will do that Indefi- he said last night oh his retain from England. Has Sent For Go-Between Several Times; fiourt May Act Dec. 9 BOSTON, Richard Hauptmann, convicted of the kidnaping of Charles. A. Lind- bergh, Jr.. Is anxious to confess his part In the crime, according to Or. John F. (Jafsie) Condon Inter- mediary In the case. The former Fordham professor who passed ransom to a man he identified at the trial u Hauptmann, did not mention Hauptmann by name In his speech LITTLE FALLS, N. Y, Nov. 20 Lapca, a seaman who "confessed" to kidnaping Iho Lindbergh baby, was order- ed committed to the Mercy State hospital at Ullca today for ob- servation. last night to the Professional Wo- men's club, but In an Interview he said: "T am now thoroughly convince! that Hauptmann li ready and will- ing to Wke a full and complete fesslon. AE a matter oL-fact, he has sent for me three tunes, but as yet I have not gone to see him flrvillp F'arhpntpr State iThere ft reason for this." urvme uaiperuei. aidie, Auditor, To Direct Commission AUSTIN, three- member 'old age- assistance commis- sion appointed by Governor AUred selected Orvllle S. Carpenter of Dallas, now state auditor, as ex- ecutive director. Pension commissioners appointed were: Judge A. W. Cunningham of Hai- Ilngen, formerly district judge of the Brownsville-Corpus Chrlstl dis- trict for eight years, county Judge of Cameron county and mayor of Harllngcn. H. T. Klmbro of Lubbock, former- ly a member of the Industrial acci- dent board, a regent of Texas Tech- nological college and a wholesale dealer In grain, W. O. Davis of Omaha, active vice- president of the State Bank of Om- aha and former mayor and presi- dent of the school board. Meeting soon after their appoint- ment, the commission chose Odle Mlnatra of Breckenrldge ss assist- ant executive director, and Judge 'unnlngham as chairman. They said preliminary work and Investigation for the set-up of the commission was outlined, and an- other meeting would be called soon to discuss plans for placing old age assistance Into effect. Dr. Condon said Colonel Llnd bergh had expressed to him the opinion that if the right type ui man approached Hauptmann, a lull confession could be obtained. Court May Decide Case December 9 WASHINGTON, Nov. Attorney General David T. WUentz of New Jersey notified the supreme court today he had been served with papers in the Bruno Richard Haupmann appeal on Nov. 15. This would Indicate the court will act on the appeal of the Bronx .car- penter from his conviction on char- ges of slaying Charles A. Lindbergh Jr., on Dec. 9. Wllentz has until Dec. 5 to file his brief in opposition to Haupt- mann's plea for a review. He may file It this week but even though he does, it was Indicated, the case will not be submitted to the court be- fore It expects to recess. The tribunal will recess for two weeks Monday and return to delib- erations Dec. 9. Law Takes Swift Course After Officers Seize a Shipment of More Than Thirty Cases First ease in Taylor and probably the first in Texas the new state liquor control act was heard Wednes- day morning in Judge John L. Camp's eoimtv coi'rt. Pleads Guilty. Bill Smith of Big Spring pleaded guilty to charges of possession and transportation of whiskey on which ho state liad been paid. He was assessed a, fine ot and costs amounting to minimum penalty set up In the new act. The law moved swiftly. Smith Was arrested Tuesday night by Con- stable C. A. Pratt and members of the city police force after two de- liveries of liquor tfere made In the negro section of the city. Officers took possession of a truck which Smith was driving and confiscated more than 30 cases of whiskey. [Wednesday morning, under the new law, which makes liquor cases misdemeanors, County Attorney Es- oi Walter filed transportation and possession comolalnts against Smith )h cduhty 'court. He Immediately a'p- with his attorney, rgeadeA guiltifnnd paid off his fine. However, the truck and the whis- key are still being held. Walter said he would fine condemnation pro- ceedings against the tmck Inter to- day and apply for an order for sher- iff's sale of the whiskey. The truck Is property of a. wholesale drug concern of West Texas. The new law provides, said Wal- ter, that any vehicle used In vio- lation of the liquor control act may be confiscated and sold. In that event, any liens against the vehi- cle are first satisfied. Liquor To Be Sold, Liquor seized as contraband un- der the new statute Is to he sold at an advertised sheriff's sale to the highest bidder, said Walter. The bidder must hold B wholesale or package store permit. Proceeds from the sale go to de- fraying the cost of confiscation, See COUHT, Vg. 12, Col. 7 FIND BODY OF TAXI DRIVER HILDRETH TO 25TH Allred Announces He Won't Stop Execution AUSTIN, Nov. Last hope for W. R. Hlldreth. convicted of the Ice pick slaying of his wife, vanished today when Gov. James V. Allred announce'! he will not inter- fere with Hildreth's electrocution. Because a recent 30-day reprieve would cause the execution to take place on Sunday, AUred ordered an additional stay of a the death date for Monday, Nov. 25. Allred's decision came after con slderatlon of requests for commuta- tion In which the children joined. Nine jurors who returned the death verdict recommended clemency. FEDERAL JUDGE DIES COLUMBUS, Ohio, Nov. Benson W, Hough, 80, federal Judge of the southern since 1925, died I: ailment. district of Ohio night of a heart PROBE MASS MURDER PLOT Farm Couple Shot to Death CARTHAGE, Nov. A [arm couple, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Martin, aires about 40, were found shot to death at their home today. Martin was found In the backyard while Martin, his throat torn by shotgun fire, was found In the house. An automatic shotgun lay at his side. Neighbors said the Martins' four- year-old daughter was present when the shootings occurred. The Mar- tins lived 14 miles east of here. Ardmore, Oklahoma, Man Is Shot Through Head Poisoned Kills Baking Powder 3 In 'Frisco SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. o.[ Police William Qulnn today assigned two crack detectives to Investigate possibility of a mass murder plot In the distribution of arsenic-laden baking soda which has killed three persons and made 13 111. While authorities broadcast warn- ings to the 800 families who bought the poisoned bicarbonate at bargain prices, Inspectors Allen McGinn and George Engler were detached from other dudes and directed to solve the mystery. They will work with Dr. J. C. Gelger, city health officer, who first expressed the possibility of a dia- bolical poisoning plot. "It Is a matter of history there Colorado Man. 80, Claimed By Death Special to The Reporter COLORADO, Nov. 20. slices were set for 3 o'clock todav for Snmuel Patterson Wilson, 80, who died at the home of his daugh- ter, Mrs. A. D. Leach, In Colorado Tuesday night. He Is survived by eight children. They are Mrs. T. L. Grace of Has- kell, A. L. Wilson of Westbrook, J. A. Wllsor1 if stanton, Mrs. Ethel 'Colorado, Mre. Leach of Cblorado, W. T. Wilson of An- drews, Bryan Wilson of Fort Worth and Mrs. R'jby S'ason of Lamesa. CALLAIIAN ROAD WORK BAIRD, Nov. work on 21.45 miles of lateral roads, gulldlrig of two small bridges and four culverts will start In precinct ARDMORE, Okla., Nov. The body of Leo South, 35, Ardmore taxi driver, shot through the head, was found shortly after midnight dangling from the underside girders of a bridge over the Washlta river near Aylesworrh. He had been dead at least 28 hours. Officers searched the country the vicinity of Boswell- for a man wearing "cowboy" clothing, who wi South's fare when the driver let the taxi stand at 10 p.m. Monday. The taxi, bloodstained and with South's hat, bullet pierced, wi found a mile from Boswell yesten- day. Officers said thut slayei apparently had drlvpn on the bridge stopped the car and heaved the body of his victim over the retaining wai of the bridge, believing it woulc topple Into the river. Instead II caught on the girders. South was survived by his widow. Rang ers Get Raid Orders Cat Is Held For Ransom SAN ANTONIO, NOT. Fenian cat belong- taf (a Mrs. Apia Cralf, If In the hands of "eatnapen" who are demanding a nnaom of Tbe cat disappeared last week. Yesterday Mrs. Cnlff received a note directing that a ?5 bill be placed in tin can In the front yard. She tamed the noU over lo police. Last night she received a tele- phone call warning her unleaa the ransom waa paid the wovld never aee "Sklppy." Ml FHLL Tells Students Has Fond Memory of 16 Months Dr. Olustor Q. Smith, who leaves McMurry college December 1 to be- come Vice president of Southern Methodist university, said a formal fcrewell to the school tie has headed for 16 months in chapel Wednesday morning. I shall always feel very close to McMurry. I am proud to have served here, and I want to be re- membered as an ex-student and an ex-president of this said Dr. Smith. "McMurry college can push on to a great future. Institutions must be and are bigger than men. I have no greater hope than that some stu- dent will rise up to lead the school See SMITH, Pg. M, Col. Z Passenger Dies Of Injuries In Airplane Crash BIRMINGHAM, Ala., Noy. O. M. Newsom, an army ser- jeant, passenger In a navy plane that crashed Into a tree top, near here last night died today of In- juries suffered when he vas thrown from the ship. The plane, piloted by Lieut. J. D. Greer, of Coronado Beach, Cal., was one of two navy ships that be- came lost In murky weather over Alabama Rnd crashed. Pilots ol noth plnnes escaped with minor hurts. AUSTIN, Nov. L. Q. Phares, acting director ol public safety department, said today rant ers would continue to raid Top o' Hill Terrace, a resort near Fort Worth, and establishments. The Tan-ant county grind jury failed to Indict Fred Browning, op- erator of Top o' Hill, which raided recently. The ranters had filed charges of gambling. "The only statement that I would care to Phares said, "is thHt we are going to continue to raid Mr. Browning's place and all others I am Issuing Instructions to all members of the ranger force that In the future they are not only to ar- rest the operators but all of those violating the law." Phares sent a telegram to the Fort Worth district attorney questing Institution of condemneton proceedings, In which he asked the attorney general's department to join. The telegram said In part: "According fo press notices oper- ators of Top o' Hill x x x no billed by grand jury on Insufficient evi- dence. In addition to rangers who made raid x x x I have available an undercover Investigator from my department who was In such x x x house on two dlfflerent occasions Immediately preceding raid and saw the 'operation x x x In such XX x to-present wll ATTACK IN BEATEN BACK Enemy Suffers Heavy Losses; Blacks Wait- ing For December, Bad Month For Fever ADDIS ABABA, Nov. (Commnnder) Bakala AjeU, eoaunandiiif lf 000 of Zthiopit'i tat men today "Deceitfully halted tn Italian advance in the pwa hillt, inflietinff heavy IOMM it wai reliably reported hen. HoM At All Ceite Bakala Ayela, formerly Emperor Halle Selassie's chief huntsman, wai ordered several weeks ago to hold an Important pass in the hilli at all costs. Government officials hen pointed out that no counter-attacks are pen nutted yet by orders of the em- peror. These officials also stated the Ethiopian armies are delarinf major operations until Deecotbcr. November is described as the wont month lor fever In Ogaden prov- ince, especially this year became ot unseasonable .These rains are also said by Ethplonlans to have claimed many Italian lives. Warriors On March To Makale Front condemnation proceedings on x x x equipment and I am requcs Ing the attorney general's depart ment to join with you in such pro I will furnish you. wl legal authority that no ouch wa rant Is necessary to search public place x' x x." Hoover Takes a Crack at Treaty With Canadian CHICAGO. Nov. president. Hoover, attacking th Roosevelt administration for th second time In four days, charge the new trade pact between th United States and Canada woul impose hardship on America: farmers. He delivered this thrust at th treaty: "I presume it la more of th more abundant Cana dlans." Mr. Hoover plr.med to leave for California tonight. Firestone Sells Shoe Subsidiary NEW YORK, Nov. stone Tire Rubber Co. has sol Is subsidiary, Firestone Footwea Co. to U. S. Rubber Products, controlled by U. S. Rubber Co., i was announced today. The pur chase price was reported at under Allred and Family On Hunting Trip AUSTIN, Nov. nor and Mrs. James V. Allred with "Jim their eldest son, left today for the Davis mountains on a hunting trip. They expect to be ab- sent about a week on their first va- cation since entering the governor's mansion. have been such plots In American 11 of Callahan county Monday. T'ed- 3ee FOISON, Pf. 12, Col. 5 funds total with for 128 men. Jobs RICE CASE WIT1I JURY SAN ANTONIO, Nov. 20 The Jury trying Mrs. Qlotlys Bice, charged with tho slaying of Ben H. Kelly, attorney, contlnufd Its delib- erations today. It writ given the can last night. E Nineteen Gun Farewel Salute Is Given to Vice President MANILA, P. I., NOV. America's congressional delegation to the recent Inauguration of the Philippine commonwealth sailed for home today to the accompaniment of a 19- cun farewell salute to Vice- President John Nance Gamer. A few of the parly of approxi- mately the largest official group ever to make the round remained here Including Sena- tor Burton K. Wheeler of Montana. His wife was confined to Sternberg nllitary hospital with a digestive disorder. Speaker Joseph Byrns o.' the United States house advised the Ive-day-old government to live within Sis means "In order (o estab- lih Its credit like a new business." After Gamer declined 'to be In- terviewed, Emll Hurja of the dem- jcratlc committee handed out a Set, GARNER, 12, S Must Serve 25 Years In Pen For The Killing of Drunken Father WISE, Vs., Nov. neys for comely Edith Maxwell, convicted of killing her blacksmith father because he objected to her coming home at pushed attempts today to sweep aside her 26-year prison sentence. Her uncle. W. W. Dotson, said he would seek a motion for a new trial In the courtroom where a Jury of mountaineers brought In a first-de- gree murder verdict last night aft- er deliberating 30 minutes. If thu motion is denied, he he will carry the case to the su- >rcme court of appeals. "Justice has been was the only comment nf Commonwealth's Attorney Fred B. Orear. He cited the scriptural Injunction. 'Honor thy father and thy mother." n urging the Jury yesterday to con- 'ict the girl whose code hart clashed SK CONVICTED, Pf. II, CM. 3 BrThe Aarifclated PWM wfcrttors ifc :to' aittcir :unan betVesn polo and __ Uteri on '-the southern caused 'casualties reported at ntott than both sides. v .The'" Italian man 'received word that'a strong column of Halle Selassie's soldlen was advancing toward Bellcot, tlfhl mlies below Makale, into territory which the Italians had been con- solidating their position. Italians Ambwhed Unofficial dispatches reaching Ha- rar, in eastern Ethiopia, laid mora than 150 native Somali troops wen killed or wounded on the Italian side In a battle In the south, while) Ethiopian casualties were unofficial- ly put at more than 300. These reports said some Italian officers., leading a convoy of Italian irucks which were ambushed by Ethiopians, were wounded but es- caped. The encounter was said to have occurred south of Sasa Baneh, ISO miles southeast of Harar, on the left bank of the Fafan river. It was re- See WAK, 12, CoL I Authorize Jobs For Texas Workers By WPA SAN ANTONIO, Nov. Jobs for workers from Tuai relief rolls were authorized today as Works Progress Administration icre Issued work orders on projects nvolvlng expenditure of of Federal funds, It Increased the amount of fed- eral funds authorized to be expend- ed on WPA projects In to and the number of jobs reated for relief roll workers to according to Robert J. Smith, deputy state administrator. Bulk of today's authorizations were received by the Waco district, where official; may begin 29 new )rojects employing approximately ,500 percons. AblTenj Fair ud tonight and ThUMday, West Weit o( lOOUi nwldlin air, warmer In north portion tonight; 'hurfiday. fair, wnrmer In tail portion Fail Ran of tooth meridian illchtly warmer In north portion !o- Iht: Thursday lair, ftllgMy warmer In e Interior. Tempentuna Tun. WM. iRIOHT 97 <0 '.14 92 (8 It 34 MlinKhl Sunrln Sunnl -Tn-'n. 7a.m. J thtrmomd'ir .-M" 10" et thermometer 91" latin humidity ..99% Mft Mft   

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