Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Abilene Daily Reporter Newspaper Archive: November 13, 1935 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Abilene Daily Reporter

Location: Abilene, Texas

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Daily Reporter, The (Newspaper) - November 13, 1935, Abilene, Texas                               VVA U S5J8 wanay "WITHOUT Pi WITH OFFENSE TO SKETCH YOUR IXACTLY It IT ailp Bftcporttr TCH YOUR WOO IXACTLY M IT VOLLV. Wbw if (W) ABILENE, TEXAS, X NOVEMBER 13, IMS-TWELVE fjftfiES (Evwrin. UN AMm HOUSE BLOCKS HICKMAN Lynching Of Two At Columbus Condoned By Official EIGHT CHILDREN DEAD IN FIRE 1 Fiance Grilled In Strangle Death With his flanon left, found beaten and KtranfM U death, Blthard IS, right, Washington heaplUI attendant, wu held ky TUk, Md., for quotlonJjit. The body the girl. Corlnne Lorlng, W-jear-erM rtencfrmpbtr, who nntohed tw0 dan before her wed- ding date, waa found In a thicket near ML Rainier, Md. The alajer had gagged and bntally beaten Ua rletlm. A former ndUr Mba Uning wu held for binatlfiUoa. i c HUNDREKPAY RNAL TRIBUTE IK RITES HERE Banks and District Court Close For Funeral of Rich Keeble Under a bleak winter's sky th body of Rich Keeble, banker of Ab lene, was returned late Monda from Dallas, scene of his death, bu for his burial Wednesday mornin, the sun shone brightly and warral The rites were held at 10 o'cloc from Heavenly Rest Eplscopa church In which Mr. Keeble hi been reared and of which his late father, Rev. James W. Keeble, wa a long-time rector. The church ac comodates only 125 persons, conse quently hundreds stood outsld hearing but faintly the 40-mlnute liturgy of hymns, chant, lesson and benediction. Inside th the wife, little son, relative a few close friends occupied reserved section. The Farmers and Merchants banl- of which Mr. Keeble hud been cash ler tor many years, and the Citizen bank closed their doors from 1 o'clock until noon. Joining their of fleers and other employes in th sorrowing throng were hankers from Dallas, Fort Worth. Waco and many West Texas points. Two dlstrlc courts, the 104th In session In A'bl- lene, and the 42nd In session Balrd, stood at recess for tlv funeral. Mr. Keeble's body lay in a gray casket densely banked by flon crosses, wreaths and sprays. As the cortege entered the church, Rev Willis P. Gerhart, rector, leading the congregation arose as the vested See KEEBLE, Page 1% Col. 5 Hunt for Missing Flier "Hopeless" jUJCIn .Wan Par SINGAPORE, Straits Seltltments, Nov. C. James Melrose, Australian pilot reporied missing during a search for Sir Charles JCIngsford-Emit.il, made a forced dlng today on a beach near Parktao, Slam, because of engine trouble. Melrose has led the search for Sir Charles and Tom Pethybrldge since their plane disappeared Friday In a monsoon over the Bay of Bengal. The search for England-to- AuitraJJa filers wu reported "virln- hopelew." I Towns Important In Plan Of Joining Italy's Two Colonies By the Associated Press. Invading fascist forces extended their northern lines today and the cities of Harar and Jljtfa became the focal point of Ethiopian defense. The first army corns In the north occupied the region of Dessa and joined the DanaUl column. Genera Emlllo de Bono notified Rome. Line Extended The northern line was extended westward to the Takkaze river end the native' army corps completed the occupation of the Gheralca re- gion, the northern commander's message declared. Italian scouting planes flew over JiUna. advices from. Addis Abba said, as the Italian military com- mand published its views of pros- pective Ethiopian defense 'move- ments. Possession of Harar and Jijlga would constitute one of the steps necessary to extend the Fascist line Joining the two Italian colonies. "The offensive capacity of the enemy cannot last because he can- not be fed continually with fresh troops and the right Ttallan military view said. the The movement of the northern orces westward along the Takkaze Iver pointed toward the Lake Ta- na region, seat of British power in- terests. An official communique from Ad- See WAR, Page 11, Col. g Bodies of the Victims o North Carolina Trag- edy Are Charred ALEXIS, K. 0., Nov. children of and Mrs. Hubert Cunningham farm couple, were burned death early today as fire swep their fii-rorc, frame dwellin near here. Farati Barned. Cunningham and his wife painfully, but not seriously burned Trapped and burned to death the blaze were Robert Cunningham IS; Thomas, 15; Louise, 7; Nelll IS; -Grace, 10; Jack, 2; Juanlta, and Ruth, 11 months. The bodies were recovered late ait most of them had been charre beyond recognition..' 5Alexls Is a small community three miles from Stanley and about miles from Gaetonla. The Cunningham family had been renting on the Btrpupe farm for about were Uuddtet In'. ajflowbnaHE'rooni. The parents accontogW sheriff's Investigator occupied at :upfctairs sleeping roon with theibaby, fcuth, Clyde Btirke, Gastocla, brother-ln law of Mrs. Cunningham; .quoted he as saying that the parents narrowl escaped death In the flames. "We Just discovered the fire an Jumped out of the Burk quoted her as saying, "and when w Wed to get to the children, ther wu nothing we could do against th wall of flame." Alexis has no organized tire fight- Ing department and the house wa razed before -n volunteer organlza UOQ could be perfected. Sentenced Three Years on Charge Assault to Murder CORSICANA, Nov. ert Ouy Phillips of Dallas was sen- xnced to three years in the penlten- Jary here today on his plea of guil- ty to an Indictment as an accom- plice to a charge of assault with In- ent to murder In connection with fte wounding of W. B. Melton, Frost light watchman, Aug. 14, In a gun >attle-ln which David Stone of Dal- las was slain. Two Are Killed In Anti-British Riot CAIRO, Egypt, Nov. ierlous rioting against England rote out In Cairo and Tanta, 54 niles northwest, today, resulting In the death of two students and the wounding of 175 students and police. One student was killed at Tanta nd 80 students and 45 police In- ured. Twenty police and 21 stu- ents were Injured In Cairo In street ghtlng and one student was killed nd nine Injured In the collapse of a atrca.se during a, cemonstration. SCHOOLS PAY WILLTRIBUTE Joseph's Joins In Ob- servance Here St. Joseph's Catholic academy tribute to Will Rogers In a rogram at the school Tuesday af- joining the county-wide iservance arranged by the Rogers emorlal campaign committee. ost of the school programs were eld yesterday morning. Sister Mary Alexandra, principal St. Joseph's, made a talk on Will'. and members of class read comments made fcy e famous humorist and phlloso- her and others read newspaper ortes about his life. A memorial program slated for to- y at the Merkel school was post- ned until next week, announced oger Burgess, superintendent. program was devoted to a rage 11, Col.7 See BRITAIN, race 12, CoL 5 PREDICT WIN FOR BALDWIN Great Britain Will Go To Polls Thursday LONDON, Nov. spir- ited British election campaign end- ed today with disorders and a pre- diction by observers of victory for the present government. Tomorrow tho voters will decide Jie popularity of the government's domestic and International policies. Political commentators predict Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin's forces will receive a "workable" ma- orlty. returns will establish the po- Itlcal division of the scats in he house of commons, the fl.vst re- vision Elnce the general election four when the national party gained a record-breaking parllamcn- Frank J. Navtn pion Tigers' Is Victim Of Heart Attack DETROIT, Nov. J. Navln, 64, owner of baseband world champions, the Detroit Tigers and vice-president of the American league, died In a hospital today an hour after he fell from his horse at the Detroit riding and hunting club with a heart attack. Mrs. Navln, riding back of the widely-known sportsman on the jridle path, saw his gentle Irish lumper, galloping toward her, rider- less. Find Body In Grus She followed the horse to the stable. With L. W. Droeger, man- ager ol' the hunt club, and Mrs Droeger. Mrs. Navln made a frantic search of the riding grounds for 15 minutes before discovering her hus- tand In-a clump of tall gross. The baseball was uncon- scious, one arm thrown across his chest. He was removed to a hos- pital where he died In a few min- utes. Dr. J. P. Leonard said there were no bruises on the body and said a heart attack caused his eath. Attendants at the club said here was no evidence he had been hrown from the horse. Navln is survived by his widow, nd a nephew, Charles F. Navln. secretary of the club, who now Is t sanitarium at Battle Creek, Mich. Navln's sudden death ended a 30- See NAVIN, Page 11, Col. 7 'resident Signs Canadian Treaty Other Officials Are Not So Outspoken; Governor Allred Says All Lynch- ings Deplorable COLUMBUS, Tex., Nov. 13. Attorney 0. F. Moore mid today he believed the lynching of two youthful negroes by a mob of 700 per- lozu, including Mveral women, on a farm near here hit night, wii "an expression of the will of the people." Town Qidet Moore's statement rime soon aft- er Justice of the Peace E. O. Throw- er said he would conduct a court of Inquiry Into the lynching! some tune during the day. The town was quiet after the niob had seized Ernest Collins, 15, and Benny Mitchell, 16, who assertedly had confessed the criminal and subsequent drowning of Mis1 Genuine school honor graduate, from officers and from a llva oak_ lioutc. "I do'n'bt call the cltlieni eciited the negroes Moore. "I consider, their action an expression of the Will of the peo- ple." County Judge H. P. Hahn, said, however: 'I am strongly. opposed to mob violence and favor orderly process of the law. The fact that the groei who so brutally murdered iliss Kollmann could not be ade- uately punished by law because of heir ages prevents me from con- emnlng those citizens who meted ustlce to the ravishing murderers ast nlRht." Deplorable Eays Allred At Austin Governor James V. All- red said he did not know facts but hought "lynching wu deplorable' t any time." The mob stopped Sheriff Prank Hocgemeyer and Deputy Berry Townsend at the Colorado bridge ear Altalr, 11 miles from and the negro pair. Townsend said he did net recog- iae any of the unmasked mob, and See LYNCHING, Page Col. Girl On Solo Atlantic FUgkt Mb tan Batten, M, New Zealaad Mir. ett Lynae, Kent, in an attempt U etUMUi reosrl fw fHfhl tenet the Atlantic U NaUl, BniU. Turkey Season In Full Swing The turkey reason was In full wing In Abljene Wednesday, with rds moving to market 'in larg umbers. As a peak of 20 cents fo grade No. 1 was paid Tuesday It was tlmated that more than were Id here. Quotations here were generally IB nk today following a drop of the ew York market from 28 1-2 to 1-2 cents, but one house, report- WASHINGTON, Nov. to have paid as high as 21 cents resident Roosevelt said at his press yesterday was offering 19 cents this onference today that he had sign- 'morning. d an authorization for the govern- j The number of turkeys In this area Is less.than last year, but the birds are In fine condition and are averaging from 3 to 4 pounds heav- ier in weight. Buying was heavy Wednesday morning, and the poundage was expected to run around pounds, as great as Nor. leaa BatlM. New ment's signature of the Canadian merlcan reciprocal trade treaty. Roosevelt Hopes For Lower Rates WASHINGTON. Nov. "resldent Roosevelt expressed hope day that Interest rates would be wered so as to make large bank serves more useful In the drive recovery. No Interference In Death Sentence AUSTIN, Nov. court of criminal appeals refused finally today to Interfere with the death sentence given Ramlro Oalvan, alias Raul Oalvan, for the slaying of a border patrolman In El Paso county In 1B29. RAII. EXECUTIVE DIES CHICAGO, Nov. O. Clark, 60, executive vice-presi- dent of the Rock Islwid railroad, died suddenly Tuesday of heart trouble at his 'home In suburban Olencoe. Tuesday. Jacoby Wins Cup For Second Time NEW YORK, Nov. Ftour Acts, led- by Oswald Jacoby, lait night for the second successive year won the Vanderbllt cup team- of-four contract bridge champion- ship, first' time that feat had been performed since the event was es- Unlisted In 1S38. The Aces, swept to Hie finish with i point marglr. over Louis H. Watmn's team, the latter shaving down a lead which at one time had reached points. The Vanderbllt cup title Is con- sidered tantamount to a national championship for team-of-four com- wtltlon. Part, of the final match lad been played during the after- with the wind-up hands laat nlfht. Senate Grants House Re- quest For Adjustment Of Differences AUSTIN, Nov. sen- ate granted a house request today for a conference'adjustment of dif- ferences on a tax: bill 'designed to raise funds for old age pensions. The house rejected senate changes which scrapped Its omnibus levy plan and substituted 'selective sales and Income taxes with several In- creases In occupation taxes. No effort was made In the sen- ate to Instruct Its conferees on any provision. The house by a 83 to 40 vote told Its representatives not to approve either a general or selective sales tax. House motions to In- struct for and against an income tax failed. Lleut.-Gov. Walter Woodul ap- pointed a conference committee In which a majority lavored both the salea and Income tax amendments. Conferees were Senators Clint See LEGISLATURE, Page H, Col. 5 Mysterious Torch Deat of West Virginian Is Investigated RIPLEY, W. Va., Nov. placid evening's walk terminated In a flaming death from a tree limb last night for J. Fulton Oimnoe, 65- year old war vetaran and CCC cam] foreman. State troopers said he had been slam. A frightened farmer, James Elliott saw flames lighting window. In his night clothing Elliott ran out to low ridge about 150 yards from .he main Charleston-Farkersburg highway and found Qunnoe's blaz ng body hanging from a tree. He hurried four miles to RIpley to fit state police a negro had been langed. Troopers discovered later however, a tan Identifying Gunnoe as a white man and foreman of the Jackson civilian conservation corp camp some miles from RIpley. Roy Bradley, superintendent of the See TORCH DEATH, Page 11, Col. 6 To Be Called In April Criminal Matters Wound Up Passing the case of J. R. Maxwell, Abilene man charged with posses- sion of alcohol In violation o'. In- ternal revenue laws and with con- spiracy to smuggle, Judge James C. Wilson practically wound.up crim- inal matters In federal court here Wednesday morning. Maxwell's case was passed until the .April term of court, District Attorney Clyde O. Efl.itus stating Jut the government has further In- vestigations to make, considerable 'Ireworks had been expected to de- velop In the trial, had It been call- ed. The Indictment against Maxwell, returned recently by a federal rrand Jury In Fort Worth, charges ilm with possession last March of wo five-gallon cans of alcohol on which no tax had been paid, and with conspiracy In connection with he Importation of '.he alcohol from See COURT, IfKO 11> Col. X I Barney Blackshear, And 0. D. Stevens Seek to Escape Chair AUSTIN, Nov. for new trials were presented to the court of criminal appeals today In famous death cases. Barney Blackshear sought to escape the electric chair after being given the death verdict In three trials for the rammer slaying of Viola Brlmberry aged woman who lived with her husband In a tent In the East Texas oil field. The slaying was In Smith county and Blackshenr was tried In Harri- son county on t. change of venus. Admlsslblllty of an alleged confes Is the main mint at tefue. O. D. Stevens sought to avert a death penalty In the case In which W, D. May recently was executed after being brought back to Texas rom a federal prison. He was charged with participation In the ilaylng of Jack Sturdlva.nl, Harry Bee AFPatALS, Pafi 11, CeL KILLED; MD RE ER IS OUT PuMc Safety Commisaton Had Made Dismissal Immediate When He Refused to Resign AUBTDT, Tht how today Klltd, 74 to i rawlntiM to in diial of luftr Ton Hioknu by safety Argument over tbe limklfnt turned nearly two hours. Rep. Roy of BOOHeB charged t resolution to Uvottjria the commission's action wis Iruptr- ed by enemies of the administration and by members opposed to the public lately department, Rep. J. Manley held of SteptunTflla asserted Hlckmarf's WM due to petty jealousies and w I "Indefensible." The commission formally red Hieknnu yesterday aftar refilled to resign. Albert___. Johnson, chairman, old the wu for the good of the serrlce and became Hlckmui did not fit mto the administrative setup. Hlckmui was quoted u charftag a Win state official was t "Up- oaf man oik a raid be was ordered to make on a niort new Worth. Hofheini asiertea the resolution was an iinfalir reflection on the safety ceramlsuon uid that lUf. and _ irtnjdly toward the ad- or the depwtnent. "I undsristand there were few comptalnta at Hlckman'i exec- utive abnit} Hofhelni aid, "ud that: primarily the commimon ed because It wanted ranger cap- tain stayed In Austin at hesd- ailirtera and did not realde In Fort Worth. If you authorise this m- TjstlgaUon you are laying to erert state department they cant run their affairs without niBjeetect to the caprices of politically minded members of the house." Head was one of the sponsors of he bill In the, regular cession .Wishing the safety department '1 want It to get off on the right 'oot, though, and not get messed Page 11, Col. I Mexican Police Deport Woman LAREDO, Nov. >oyce, who gave her name u Ma- [elalne Armstrong when aba. en- tered Mexico, was deported last Ight by Mexican authorities after ler arrest in Monterrey, Mexico, hd United states Immlsratlon aa- horltles arrested her at the Inter- national bridge. She was held for Corpus Texas, officers to answer charges here of theft of a watch and dia- mond ring from Adolphus Adelalre f Corpus Chrlstl. Immigration au- horltles said she also might be rled here on charges of bringing tolen property Into the United Mis. hlnese Military Leader Is Slain TIENTSIN, Nov. Mar- Sun Chuan-Fang, former gov- mor of the lower Yangtse area, was ssasslnated this afternoon by a Chinese woman. The womar, afterward surrendered to the police. Authorities said she was lughter of a Chinese general who ad been executed by Marshal Sun. Abilene md and warmer Thursday unMtUcd; probably local Wttt of 140th meridian artly cloudy and wanner unlihl: .y mostly cloudy; colder In weel portion. Cut of 100th meridian oudy, warmer tonliht: Thuriday. (mut- ed, probHbly local ralni, warmer In erne eait portion. Temperature! p.m. M <1 M 4L Ill 
                            

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication