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Abilene Daily Reporter: Wednesday, November 6, 1935 - Page 1

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   Abilene Daily Reporter, The (Newspaper) - November 6, 1935, Abilene, Texas                               WAR1 gttrifem 29ailp Reporter "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES. WE SKETCH YOUR WURLD EXACTLY AS IT RON VOL. LV. Full Leased Wires of Associated Press (OT) United Press (UP) ABILENE, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, PAGES (Evening Edition of The Abilene Morning News) NUMBER 128 Britain-Italy Settle Differences Liquor Control Legislation Near Completion REPUBLICANS HAIL TURNING TIDE Why Baylor Old Grads Return Miss" Marguerite Joyce, Waio, Texas, (below) was chosen Baylor university's homecoming sweetheart for the annual football game be- tween her school and Texas Christian university. The prize-winning Afloat she rode was entered by the Urbanlles, an organiiaition of Waco girls attending Baylor. (Associated Press Photo. Newsmen A re Freed Of Contempt Charge TESTIMONY IN GREEN TRIAL Two Altercations Preceded Fatal Shooting Specir1 to The Reporter COLORADO, Nov. wit- nesses In the murder trial of C. W. (Chicken) Green, dance hall op- erator of Snyder, Wednesday morn- Ing told the jury that two alterca- j contempt by District Judge M. S. Munson at Angleton after they re- fused to obey an order prohibiting publication of testimony in the trial of Clyde Thompson, life termer be- ing tried for the murder of a fellow convict. Judge Munson ordered publication withheld on grounds it would 1m- Court Has No Authority To Prohibit Publishing of Testimony AUSTIN, Nov. Texas court of criminal appeals today ruled district judge did not have authority to forbid publication by newspapers of testimony taken at a public criminal trial and ordered six Houston newspapermen released from contempt charges. Refused To Obey Order The newspapermen were held In tions preceded the fatal shooting tf Erwin Woellerl, at a dance nl Green's place the night of last May 30. Green is charged with Woel- lert's death. Mary Arnett, Snyder girl who was g with Woellert early in the Evening, testified that John Ethe- ridge, yon-in-law of Green, came to Woellert on the floor and told him to leave the place, and when he did not Green came over and grabbed him by the neck and knocked him down with knucks. She said Woel- lert had been orderly throughout the night. Roy Roberson, who also was at the dance, told the jury he saw an altercation in the hall, and thai later In the night, he saw Green outside with a pistol and that he knocked Woellert down. This tes- timony was corroborated by Leonard Lankford, who added on cross ex- amination that Woellert struck Green first, in the dance hall. Lank- ford said he left the place when he saw a group of women holding the door trying to keep Green In the hall, and thai as hz crossed the lot he heard four or five shots. "He has enough Ruth Davis testified Green said following the altercations. She said she was In the hall and a short time before had seen Green with a pistol In his hand and his wife and another IK.-tan holding him by the arms. died In the Stamford 'hospital from two bullet wounds in the body, Dr. E. P. Bunkley of Stamford testified. Jury In the case was completed Tuesday, and prosecution testimony was started this morning. Ten state witnesses had been heard at noon, but testified to seeing Woel- lert shot. Democrats Make Light of Claims; Point to Own Strength By I he Associated Press. Tasting the sweetness of victory scored In the assembly elections In the Empire State, republican lead- ers said today they saw a turn in the tide for 1936, but democratic chiefs sharply disputed this. The party that failed to re-elect Hoover in 1932 topped Its numerous scattered victories in state and mu- nicipal elections yesterday by re- gaining control of the assembly In President Roosevelt's home siate of ew York. Elecl Tiro Mayors It also elected mayors in Phil- adelphia and Cleveland, increased Its majority In the New Jersey as- sembly and retained control of the state senate there. On the other hand, democrats re- tained two seats in congress from New York City, ran up a record majority In the assembly balloting In their stronghold of Hudson coun- ty, N. J., won overwhelming approv- al of Democratic Governor Herbert H. Lehman's state relief bond issue'ln New a'nd looked toward Kentucky today to count the democratic gubernatorial nominee the winner. Two persons were killed and two wounded In shooting and cutting affrays In Kentucky, and there were some fist fights In Philadelphia, ewhere the day passed off quietly. Republicans elected 82 of the New York state assembly's 150 members and changed a previous democratic margin of four into a republican majority of 14. Melvln C. Eaton, republican state chairman, hailed the Empire State vote as "clearly showing a trend away from the New Deal." Postmaster General Farley, dem- ocratic national and state chair- man, countered by saying the stale had sustained the national admini- stration by giving It about a majority. He charged gerryman- dering of districts had made it Im- possible for democrats to gain a ma- jority of assembly seats except (Ji case of a national landslide. Edward W. Curley, democrat, de- feated Victor Santini, republican, for v.jnBress from the 22nd New York district. Curley will take the Ste ELECTION, PnEc 13, Col. 7 Eminent Scientist Taken By Death Santa Anna Alive Again? GONZALES, Nov. (AP) The 100-year-old challenge of this sacred spot in Texas history was accepted last night. The town is in the midst ot a centennial celebration. The first shot in Texas' struggle for Inde- pendence was fired here 100 years ago. Froudiy the citizens got out Texas' first battle Hag, across which iris emblazoned the words, ''Come and take and hoisted it high to the top of the pole on the general mercantile store building. This morning the celebrants were amazed. The flag was gone and a note was pinned to the staff. It read: "We did." RANGERS RAID GAMING HALL Stage Surprise Seizure At Fort Worth PORT WORTH, Nov. Texas., .rangers plodded .through. three miles of woods, cut their way through a stout wire fence, staged a surprise raid on the Dalatlal Top O1 Hill Terrnce, 12 miles east of here, last night and seized gaming equipment valued at Ranger Captain J.'W. McCormlck, once drafted as police chief of Wichita Falls during turbulent oil boom days, and Sergeant Sid Kelso, clanked Inlo the gambling palace In their high heel boots and wearing ten-gallon hats. Smartly gowned women and their escorts were lined up nnd their names recorded. Five men were ar- rested and charged with keeping and exhibiting premises for the pur- pose of gambling. Three elaborate roulette wheels, !pur dice tables, two blackjack or 'twenty-one" tables, one "chucka- uck" stand, 15 decks of cards, about chips and a half bushel of dice were hauled to Fort Worth in two trucks by the rangers. Rangers said a court order would be sought for destruction of the equipment. The five men charged were Fred Browning. Dudley Goodstlne, W. S. Jones, George Cross and Harry Ap- pel. All five were taken to the Tar- rant county Jnll nnd made bonds. Shirley To Wed Sh-h-h! It's a. rath- er a known only to one cr two people plus American and British movie fans, hut Shirley Grey, below, Hollywood chnrmer, whispers she'll be mar- ried by Christmas. The lucky swain is Arthur Eng- lish actor, who already has the license. Senate Gives Final Ap- proval To Small Meas- ure; Issue To Go To Conference AUSTIN, Nov. Liquor legislation was speeded today as the Texas senate vot- ed 20 to 5 to let the house sus- pend joint rules of procedure to pass its Bradbury package license bill. The house had requested such action by vote of 87 to 27. Wednesday, under joint rules is set aside for the house to act on bills that already have pass- ed the senate and for the senate to act on house bills. Wets Die Kurd The senate liquor bill, passed ear- ly this morning, cannot reach the house until tomorrow. If the house bill Is not passed filially today. It cannot reach the senate In time foi action this week. Die-hard wets fought a last-stand battle for delay. Sen. Weaver Moore, Houston, sold the .rules are to protect the minorities and would be used for that purpose. Sen. T. J. Holbrook, Galveston, said both house and sen- ate liquor bills disregarded the ex- pressed will nf the peonln In voting for repeal, and should be defeated. Moore said the wets hope as last resgrt to force some comprO' mise. The inducement .offered for a, compr is enbugh votes to put' the bill Inlo Immediate elfect. That takes two-thirds vote of both house and senate. With a majority vote only, the bill must wait 90 days. Sen. Clint C. Small, Anmrlllo, an- nounced the dry plan Is to let the house pass the bill by flop. J. Bry- an Bradbury, Abilene, day and send It to the senate. Senate drys then propose to substitute the Small bill and send it bnck to the house. House rejection of the change will throw both bills Into a conference committee. A conference committee !s needed. Small said, to make a workable bill. Sec LEGISLATURE, Page 13, Col. er Leads Kentucky Race British Fleet In Mediter- ranean And Italian Armed Force In Libya To Be Reduced NEW YORK, Nov. (T) The American museum of natural his- tory announced that Henry Fair- field Osbom, eminent scientist, died today at his home in Garrison, N. See NEWSMEN, Page 13, Col. 8 Y. Four Children Dead In Fire, Fathers In Jail CARIBOU, Me., Nov. children died today 1n a fire which Center 2t5 Miles South- east of Port Eads, La.; Moving Slowly JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Nov. con.st residents anxiously watched weather reports today as a tropical hurricane, which left eight dead on thn r-astern seaboard, ap- parently hnd recurved hi the Gulf of Mexico to menace the shoreline along the guir. At a. m., eastern standard :ime. the weather bureau at New Orleans located the center of the disturbance about 275 miles south- east of Port Eads, LSI., moving in a vest, northwesterly direction. Gordon E. Dunn, meteorologist nt .he Jacksonville weather station, said there was no Immediate dan- ;er to the west coast as it would require 12 to 20 hours for the storm LOUISVILLE, Ky., Nlv. 8 I to reach the shore even If it turn- First scattered returns today from cd suddenly and started directly to- Kentucky's gubernatorial election ward land. By the Associated Press. Mussolini and Great Britain, Paris diplomatic circles said today, have settled their differ- ences in the Mediterranean. As a result, Premier Pierre Laval, of France, renewed his efforts for a peace settlement to end the Italian invasion in East settlement ac ceptable to the leap'e of na lions and Ethiopia, as well as to II Duce. Settlement Basis. The basis of settlement, apparent- ly, was this: Mussolini will reduce his Jnscls forces In Libya, bordering Egypt on the west, to normal strength. In return, the British fleet In the Med- iterranean will be reduced. Another condition of the settle- ment, as reported In Paris, was an end to the anti-British propaganda In Italy. This was Insisted upon by the British to end the anil-English dem- onstrations current In Italy. The Paris reports further sale! Mussolini assured Britain he would respect its Interests in the Medlter- ranean area. The settlement of signed to allay the tenseness between Italy and England. 'arlSlhS''ttonT England's leadership In the league's sanctions war against been in the making for several days It beKiiii iiii Geneva last iteek v' Sir Samuel Hoare, the British for- eign minister, conferred with Baron Pompce Aloisl, Museollnl'i; --dele- gate to the league. Confer In London. Last night, II Ducc conferred with Sir Eric Drummond, the British am- bassador, after which the defense council met in London. The withdrawal of Libyan troops and some of the British ships, the Paris reports said, will not come, however, until after the British par- liamentary elections, November 14. The incumbent Stanley Baldwin government Is regarded as certain to Bee WAR, Page 13, Col. 8 Mexico Clamps On 3 Sanctions MEXICO CITY, Nov. of the four voted by the League of Nation! against Italy were put Into effect by Mexico today, The three, establishing an arm embargo, prohibiting the expor- tation to Italy of certain prod- nets, and creating financial sanc- tions, became effective with pub- lication of decrees issued by President Lazaro Cardenas. Beginning; Nov. 18 the other sanction, prohibiting the Impor- tation of Italian will be reinforced. GRID PLAYER NOT TED KEY Dean Says He's Really Clois With False Credentials AMARILLO. Nov. Earl Miller of the University ot California at Los Angeles said to- day after a conference with R. B. Norman, Amarlllo high school prin- cipal, that "there seems little doubt" that "Ted" Key, UCLA football player, Is Clols Francis Key and not the real Ted. Miller said he was awaiting a further check of documentary dence. Russell P. (Ted) Key, brother of Clols Francis, remained In seclusion and his family here refused infor- mation as to his whereabouts. Mrs. Catherine Chapman, former Vcrnon, Texas, teacher now employ, ed in the high school here, Identl- "Tied a photograph of the TJCLAl fotoball player as that of Clols Francis Key. She said both "Shorty" and..'.'Ted11 JiacUbcen. in her classes. The UCLA player was suspended, last Saturday before the crucial game between UCLA and the Unl- verslty of California- -of. Berkeley, Miller blamed Key's suspension for causing loss of the Pacific Coast conference championship by UCLA. Miller said he would go to Pan- handle, Texas, later today to check high school records there but did not think It necessary to question Conch Al Baggett at Canyon. "It Just looks like we lose a good Abilene find vlclnlly Cloudy lonlght and or looih o.'Uy fair lonjplit nnd Thursday except lowers In extreme southeast ponton, [mm r In nnrlli 'ind ensL portions lonlKhl, olinljly IlKhl frcflt In rxtrcme west por- yesterday pave Lieut. Gov. A. B. (Happy) Chandler democratic nom- At present, the meteorologist said, the hurricane wns Ince, a slight lead over Judge King j and thut this'miirht be Indicative of Swope, but they were Insufficient to j a shaiper curve nnd keep the west Indicate a trend. Ten precincts out: coast still Li Lhn danger zone, of a total of gave Chandler I Storm warnings, flying from Ce- 128; Swope 999. REPEALISTS LEADING LOUISVILLE, Ky., Nov. Robert Veitch Wood, 74, Pioneer; Prominent In Business, Church Special to The Reporter. GOLDMAN, Nov. Veitch damaged a small home containing RepealLsts led on first returns today the families of Alclde Martin and from Kentucky's referendum on re- Maxlme Bouchard. pea of 1Ls prohibition amendment. Mrs Martin P.nfl Mrs. Bouchard, i from 65 scattered precincts sleeping together, and dar Key to Carrabole, Dunn said, of 100th meridian Clomly, rrnliably local dhowcni In south portion tonlKhl and Thursday, warmer In norm nnd weal portions lonlKlit and In j norlhen.'l nnd southwest pontons ThUTB- SlOWly I liny. for 24 hours ending 7 R m 12 l.'ichrs. ralnrull since first of year, 27.31 Hnlnrnl] for same period last yrnr, 10.37 Korm.il rafnfac fo da'.c. 22.75 Inches. Tcmpcrntiire.' Tncg, Wed. Sec STORM, Page 13, Col. 2 Albany Man Is Critically III three other I out cf the state's showed: children, made their way to safety. rePea1' 4 3ls- 3.890. Three of the victims were chil- dren of Bouchard and the oth- er a child of Mrs. Martin, Both fathers were in jail in Houl- ton, serving sentences for non-sup- Convicted In San Antonio: port. For Special fcn The Reporter 0. STAMFORD, Nov. Strong sentiment In favor of old I of Ross Garmnn of Albany, who has age pensions was indicate on first, becn ln tho strinirorcl sanitarium returns. Forty-six out of tlin state's precincts on the constitutional amendment Lo permit gave: For pensions, against 692. fevcral days, Is reported ns critical. His mother. Mrn. Mary Carman of Burbank. Ohio, and his are at Hie bedside. 8 4d 7p.r a OUDY Dry thermometer Wei thermometer ..42- Melnl'vc hlimldlly KEYS, Page 13, Col. 2 Identify Victim ol Strike Fatality At New Orleans NEW ORLEANS. Nov. man shot to death In the vicinity of the strike-stricken wharves here lost night was tentatively Identified today as Rafc McKlnney, 42, of ShawnccLown, 111. Police announced the tentative Identification after hearing the story of his companion, Thomas Re- gn, 59, of how two negroes ao- them n.s they neared the wharf r.rar Elyslan Fields and one of them fired nt McKlnney, wound- tnff him In the chest fatally. The negroes csctincd. Lri5t nipht'.i shooting resulting In McKinnry's death. If it Is connected with the dock Inbor controversy here ond at other ports, will bring total number of deaths since the start of the strike to Lake Steamer Is Agroumd In Storm SAULT STE. MARIE, Mich.. Nov. steamer J H. Franta went aground on Iroquols Polnte, seven miles north of here, during a snowstorm enrly roday, the U. S. const guard reported. Coast guardsmen believed the ship was not In Immediate danger. of Perjury In Denial He Wed Girl AUSTIN, Nov. court of criminal appeals today overruled 142 Million More For WPA Grants WASHINGTON, Nov. (IF} Comptroller General J. R. McCnrl Drouth Brought Warm-Hearted Will Here In '32 A BILENIANS and oilier a motion for rehearing filed by today approved more or A 7, William n. Welbiim. Jr.. convicted WPA In 98 Of tnb arca' wllh tlle Wood, 74, pioneer and prominent in jwilllam D. Welburn, Jr., convicted WPA projects In 9.9 kat'es.' loleman business and church life, In Bexar county o'perjury and sen- died unexpectidly fit morning. His action boosted to this jtenced to seven years. 173 the total of projects from which He had gone to the of- Welburn was Indicted on tlie state administrators may select basis of testimony given In trial of those to be carried out. Ice of Dr. R. H. Cochran, complaln- ng of feeling badly, and suddenly slumped forward in a chair, A heart attack was thought to have caused his death. Mr Wood was bom In Lowndes county, Miss., November 15, 1860, and came to Coicman June 1, 1885, from San Saba. He was county clerk of Colemnn county, 1894-I90B; city clerk of Uolcman, 1913-1027; and nt the time of death was sec- retary-treasurer of the O'.eman Sec PIONEER, 13 Col. a divorce suit brought against him McCarl also released of by WlneW long Welburn. Welburn WPA allotments to the 20 states denied he married the plaintiff In [bringing to .the total available for Immediate expenditure. The value of projects approved by McCari today Included: Oklahoma Texas, Boerne In July, 1033, as alleged In her petition, and contended his purported signature on a notice of Intention to marry was a forgery. The appeals court ruled IJic re- marks of the trial Judge on testi- mony of certain witnesses and the arguments of the district attorneys to the Jury were not reversible er- ror. Welburn formerly was pastor of the Government Hill Methodist church In San Antonio. POSTPONE NAVAL PARLEY LONDON, Nov. ment of (i conference of naval pow- ers from Dec. 2 to Dec. 5 was offi- cially announced today. It was said the change was arranged to give Japanese delegates sufficient time to reach London. rest of the nation In a memorial to the late Will Rogers, art; paying tribute to more than a gloom-dis- pelling cowboy and philosopher who entertained from stage, screen and radio. In i warm Bpol In their hearts Is the memory of a friend who came In a great hour of nfcd lo relieve sufferlnc and hunger among Ihc drouth-stricken and lo leave behind the realization thn.1 the needy could and would be cared for. That memorable drouth-relief crusade of Will Rogers, In which more than was poured out 'or the assistance of sufferers In Arkansas, Texas and Oklahoma, Mi native state, brought him to Abi- lene on January 28, 1032. The] Will's appearances In West Texas, three Southwestern states were more severely stricken that year by drouth than any in the nation. Will Rogers mnfle n one-hour morning appearance at the Harriln- university auditorium, and the nmtlnee netted for this area in spite of the fact that the hour was a iiard one for securing crowds at public gatherings. All of the proceeds went di- rect to drouth-sufferers. Will Rogers wa.i providing all of his own expenses, and the Abilene central committee, hy seven counly chairmen, hart or- ganized Ihc program m Ihcrc would lie no local expenditures from the fund. Rain, welcomed as nature's con- tribution to drouth relief, market! and lie even kidded the folks aboMt that. He was milking state tour by plane, the thrce- when the wentlier permitted, with the cele- brated Frank Hawk.s, who is now taking P. lead In the memorial com- palgn. Will's plane was grounded after an appearance at Austin, and his engagements were delayed a day, but ho pushed through by automo- bile and made every appearance thai hnd been planned. He riuno to Abilene from San An- gelo, arriving at a. m., and went on tho stage at He wns accompanied by Chester Bycrs, trick-roping ace, and Jimmy Rodg- crs, Victor recording sHgcr and guitarist famous for his "bluo yodel" records, and they contributed their wares to the program. Jimmy Rodgers died more than a year ago. For 45 minutes, Will kept his crowd in an uproar. He started on IJic Texas Icglsl.i turn, and be- fore lie was through he had wise-cracked about almost ev- erything else. H was after 12 o'clock when he left the stage, but he declined offers of lunch nnd hurriedly dcpnrled for llreckenrldge, where he hud an afternoon benefit. Character- istically, Will left wUhonl even a.skl.ig what the proceeds from his charily show had amounted lo. In accordance wllh an agreement between nine county chairmen of this area, tin1 gross receipts of the Sec ROGERS, Face 10, Col I   

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