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Abilene Daily Reporter Newspaper Archive: October 22, 1935 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Daily Reporter

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Daily Reporter, The (Newspaper) - October 22, 1935, Abilene, Texas                               "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES, WE SKETCH YOUR WUflLD EXACTLY A VOL. LV. Leased Wto of AMMtaM Pran United Prm (UP) ABILENE, TEXAS, TUESDAY, OCTOBER TWELVE PAGES --Byron Edition of The AMm Mttnlng News) NUMBER 117 British Leave W4y Open For Peace House Orders Immediate Report On Tax Bills FDR Greets Panama's Chief PremMent Reaievelt wu the pieat Fnatdcnt RanMdla Arlai Panama and Kn. ArUa when he atoppcd In the canal lane dBrltw Mi vacation cnilie. The three an alum here In an Mtwohile after President Boowvelt arrlTed In Panama. Pnai President Back On U. S. Soil Tomorrow Well Known Rotan Man Has Fractured Skull As Horse Falls Special to The Reporter STAMFORD, Oct. Da vis, 41, of Rotan, died at m today at the Stamford sanitarium Death resulted from a fracturei skull received late Monday when i horse fell on him. Davis, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. D Davis of Roby and a. nephew (Cyclone) Davis, was manager the Williams and Miller gin of Ro tan. The accident occurred while Da vis and George Rlley of Rotan wer doctoring sick cattle on Darts' farm seven miles west of Rotan. Davl was riding full speed after a cow when his horse went-down with him He was brought to the sanitarium in an unconscious condition Mon- day night. Besides his parents, hi: wife and two children survive. Hostess of Night Club Is Held In Slaying of Man ORLEANS, Oct. lwiie pretty 22-year-old blonde host- ess of a restaurant and beer parlor and her bartender friend were held here today in the slaying of Holland C. Steele, 24, pleasure-seeking Ala- baman who recently won in the Irish sweepstakes. City Detectives Arthur Leininger and Albert Gerlinger made public a statement In which they said the girl, bcoked as Elva Cross, alias El- sie Smith, told of stabbing SteeTe In the back to protect the bartender In a butcher-knife fight. The officers said she told them Steele had first swung a butcher knife at hev and then attacked her bartender friend, who said he was Henry Langhauser, 33. They con- sidered filing formal charges against the ?lrl tonight, detaining the man at the same time. George E. Jester Dies In Corslcana CORSICANA, Oct. E. Jester, long-tlmt banker, died at his home here early today following a several weeks Illness with a heart attack. He was vice-president of State National bank and for- :rly was president of the First :ate bank. Mr. Jester was treasurer of the Centra] Texas conference of the Methodist Episcopal church. South, for many years. Surviving are his wife, Jwo daugh- ters, two brothers and two sisters. Cruiser Houston To Drop Anchor In Charleston Late Tonight .ROUTE. 'TO. t President ivfiig apparently outriced the .Caribbean hurricane, today to mate a direct run to Charleston, S. C., for anchorage late tonight. The original schedule called for his arrival at Charleston tomorrow. The president will go ashore at Charleston tomorrow afternoon, and possibly make an address there be- fore boarding a special train for his return to the White Bouse Thurs- day morning. Bill Wallace Gets License to Marry Louisiana Girl HOUSTON, Oct. B. (Bill) Wallace, all-American back- field star at Rice Institute, had a license today to Mary Miss Lucille Watklns of Welsh, La., but "no def- inite date" was set for the wedding. Wallace admitted that he obtain- ed the marriage. license while in Dallas Saturday for the Rice-South- ern Methodist football game, but he said he didn't know when the wed- ding would be set for. Miss Watklns Is not a student in Rice. Her father, J. L. WatWns, 1s a Rice farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Watkins said at Welsh they knew nothing of their daugh- ter's plans. Rice Institute does not bar stu- dents from marrying. HEPIOVIDfD Committee Action Over- ruled; Senate Contin- ues Debate On Pension Proposal, AUSTIN, Oct. 22. The house today overruled its revenue and taxation commit- tee and ordered an immediate report on bfflj to increase sul- phur, oil and utilities gross re- ceipts taxes to pay old age pen- sions. A motion to set an omni bus tax bill for special consid- eration failed, 42 to 89. Debate Pension BUI The senate continued debate on administrative provisions of a bill to establish an old age pension sys- tem. The house spent the entire mom- Ing bickering over procedure of th ivenue and taxation committee reporting an omnibus tax bin .an delaying single shot tax proposals. Unable to suspend trie rules permit Instruction of the committee house adjourned for two mln ordered the reports by majority vote, "Sponsors of tax b fau-eti reports LOO. the. single bills would so clog the calendar that n tax legislation 'would be passed. Pro- ponents of single shot bills, how ever, asserted that to delay the measures would open the door to general sales tax In the closln hours of the session. "We will now witness a process o maneuvering to see which autho panics which Industry first, flllbus tering and continual bickering tha will produce no Rep. Ken leth McCalla of Houston predicted Hits Lobbyists Activities of the sulphur compan obbyists were sharply attacked b lep. J. Franklin Spears of San An ocio, author of sulphur tax in rease. "If the governor had one-tentf he power of these sulphur compan obbyists he would be a good gov apears said heatedly. "They re here morning, noon and nigH nd are menaces to Texas." Spears predicted the omnibus ta 111 would fall because of concen trated opposition and the legists ure would be forced to a genera sales tax for pensions. Failure to follow the program out ined by the revenue and taxatlor ommlttee would result in the death f all tax. legislation, Rep. J. C Duvall of Fort Worth asserted be ause the calendar would be clog Hurricane Engulfs East Cuba, Western Haiti; Heavy Damage HAVANA, Oct. roarinl hurricane which engulfed the east- ern Up of Cuba and western Haiti today left three persons reported dead and four Injured In Santiago, Cuba. Sweeping up from .the Island of Jamaica where It caused damage estimated at the hurri- cane, accompanied by torrential rains, wrecked buildings andi lifted roofs In Santiago, filling the streets with debris. The city's electric light and power was cut off when the power plant's roof was ripped loose, while there was a scarcity of bread and milk. A message to Havana from Antll- la, In Oriente province, said the steamship Cuba had been forced to put In there vhen tie force of the storm precented It from continuing U> Baracoa, near the eastern tip of lands. the Island. Among the known deaths .it San- tiago was that of Epltania Perez, 38, who died of Injuries received when a wall fell on her. The damage or the number of in- jured In Santiago and Oriente prov- ince, where the hurricane appar- ently centered, could not be deter- mined. The gale was described as being strong enough to knock a walking man down. Two east Cuba towns, Caimanera and Bouqueron, had been evacuat- ed. The sturm's course generally was to have been through the passage, between eastern Cuba and Haiti, only 50 miles across at its narrowest point. From there jit was expected to swoop down on the eastern group of the Bahama is- Santlago had battened down for the blow. Cafes and theatres were" closed. Trams and buses were halt- ed. Patrols of firemen, police and soldiers helped secure residences against the force of the storm. Rail- roads "tied down" all rolling stock, except that used for evacuation of the populations of Calmanera and Boqueron. HAVANA, Oct. 2Z A hurricane ripped its way northeastward across the eastern Up of Cuba today. Wire communications were torn down Heavy seas hammered the coast and thousands of people moved Inland for refuge. Others took shelter In the strongest buildings the town af- forded. The United States navy station ai HURRICANE, Pace 3, Col. 4 SANTA CLAUS COMING HERE Colorful Program Is Being Planned For Dec. 6 See LEGISLATURE, Pige 11, Col. ANOTHER CALL CCC County Gets Quota of Fifty, "Borderline" Cases Out Taylor county will have oppor- unlty this week to send more boys nto the civilian conservation corps. On Friday and Saturday Capt. Charles T. Smith, commanding of- Icer of the CCO camp in Lake Ab- lene state park, will recruit 119 rom seven counties of this area. Taylor county has been given a uota of 50, but probably will not be ble to fill It. Other enrollees will ome from Nolan, Fisher. Runnels, ones, Callahan and Mitchell coun- ts, and their destination will be amps In Texas and New Mexico. Enrollees will be youths from 17 28 years of age against an 18- ear minimum In earlier calls, and, under regulations, must come from ellef rolls. That will automatically Imlnate the "borderline" oys whose parents are poor but not relief, and who want to go to elp the folks at home. Relief au- lorltles here are anxious to qualify hut class, but say they cannot do If they cou'', the quota, would x filled quickly, but under the re- ef roll Inhibition the county relief lice has only 14 applicants lined P- PICK JURY IN SANITY TEST Two Veniremen Voluntee Opinion Pierson Sane AUSTIN, Oct. of a Jury to determine whether Howard Pierson, 21-year-old slayer of his parents, is insane at present continued in district lourt here to- day. Three men qualified out of the first 16 quesiloned from a new Oliver Cunningham of Abi- lene, who b In Austin as one of the defense attorneys, is a brother-in-law of Icug-tlme friend of (lie late Judge Pier- son. venire of 150. Thirteen previously had been accepted. When 32 have qualified, state and defense may challenge 10 each. Most of those disqualified had formed opinions. Two blurted out they thought the defendant sane, and promptly were checked by Dis- trict Judge C. A. Wheeler. Judge Wheeler emphasized re- peatedly to venlremen that the only Issue In the present trial was wheth- er Pierson now Is Insane. Should See PIERSON, 11, CoL I Santa Glaus Is coming to town I Decision to bring the children's favorite to Abilene, along with a colorful parade of floats and comic strip characters uuder direction of the Gainesville Community Circus wasrreached Tuesday, morning at a, meeting of a committee of business men. at the chamber of commerce. The advent of Eanta Claus will be on Friday, December 8, with a pa- rade at p.m. It will be preced- ed by the formal launching of the Christmas season with decorated show windows in various business Protests Delay In P.O. Construction Blanton Urges Elimination o "Red Tape" After Orna- ments Disapproved Checking on delays in construc- tion of the new United State? post- office, .building, Congressman Ijyhom'as protest Ijb LJ.A.-' Simon, supervising architect, In Washington. A copy of the message follows: "In checking up delay in con- struction of new building here, con- tractor advises that he suffered two and a half months delay be- cause of failure of architect to fur- nish full-size letalls; then photo- graphs of terra cotta models of establishments Thursday evening, ornaments were held in December 5. Ernest Orissom of Ernest Gris- som's, Inc., acted as chairman of the Tuesday morning session. Pro- posals considered at an early meet- Ing were submitted and passed fi- nally. In addition to the Santa ,'ciaus parade downtown business streets will be (decorated with Christmas trees elevated on posts. Colored lights will line designated streets in the business district. Streets to be especially lighted for le parade and the remaining three weeks until Christmas are: Pine. 1st to 5th; Walnut, 2nd to 4th; Cy- press, 1st to 4th; Cedar, 1st to 3rd; North 1st, Pine to Cedar; North 2nd, Walnut to Cedar; North 3rd, Wal- nut to Cedar; North 4th, Walnut to Pine; Chestnut. 1st to 4th; Oak, 1st to 2nd; South 2nd, Oak to Syca- more; South 1st, Oak to Elm. The special lights will be provid- ed for all other business establish- ments not embraced In these areas at nominal cost. The circus directors will provide decorations for eleven floats, a 'Funny ten persons and cos- tumes and equipment for eighty- five people In the parade. Boute >f the parade wns not announced )ut will not raceec! two and one- half miles In length. Spanish Convict Married Before Execution Today GRANADA, Spain, OctT Manuel Vargas, a convicted slayer if ho was executed at 7 a. m. today n a garrote, was married yesterday the prison chapel In order to 'ake his child legitimate. Under Spain's method of execu- ion by the garrote an Iron collar i fastened around the neck of the ondemned man and screws are urned making It uradually tighter until he Is throttled. Grady KInsolvina Reported Better Marked Improvement in the con- t on of Orady Klnsolvlng, former bllenlan seriously 111 m Corpus hristl, was reported at p. in. TMsday In a telegram received from here. He has been ill since Friday, uffcrlng from a blood Infection re- ultlng from a scratch on the arm. Mr. Klnsolvlng Is publisher of the orpus Chrlstl Caller and Times. He a brother of Mrs. Hsnry Bass ol I two weeks and disapproved because eagle didn't look fierce enough and Indian didn't wear feathers. Arch- itect Castle advises me that he used facsimiles of Eagle, Buffalo and In- dian on current United states coins. Abilene people have suffered so many delays during past two years they are harboring bad. impression of government efficiency in business, hence I would appreciate it If you would adjust matters and eliminate all red tape delays." It has been estimated that the building Job Is running about two months behind time. First delay came early in the summer, said H. H. Sherry, superintendent of con- struction, when the order for win- dow frames from an Indians, mill were six weeks late In arriving. At this time, Sherry asked for cancel- lation of the time work- ing completion of the Job, and asked for an extension, but he has received no notice. Basement work went off according to schedule, with plumbing and heating already installed. However brick work is coming very slowly, reaching Tuesday only into the sec- ond story, Concrete underfloors have been laid. COTTONSEFD BROKER DIES DALLAS, O Isaac Yopp. 80, one of Texas' lead- Ing cottonseed product brokers and author of the Yopp code, used ex- tensively by cotton men throughout the country, was found dead in bed here today. Dan Moser, 61. Had Been Resident "There' For Thirty-Five Years Special to The Reporter. BALLINGEK, Oct. be- neath his overturned, automobile, Dan Moser, 81, resident of Ballin- ger for 35 years, was found dead early Tuesday on the highway n miles south of -Sweetwater. He had eft Balltnger alone about 3 a.m. to ;o to the ranch home of a sister, Vfrs. Price Mnddox, 18 miles from Colorado. Cause or time of '.he wreck could not be determined, but after an In- vestigation, Justice of Peace 8. H. Shook at Sweetwater said he would enter a verdict of death from' a chest Injury received In an auto- mobile accident. Mr. Moser was found about B. m. and ap- parently had been dead between two md hours. A Jennings Funeral coach left here late this morning for Sweet- water to return the body here for Accompanying was Chief of Police Lee Morgan of Balllnger. Funeral plans were Incomplete, but he rites will be held here and burial will be made beside the grave if Mrs. Moser, who died more than 2 years ago. Mr. Nfoser for many years was in Sec WRECK, Pafe 3, Col. 4 Chicago Bans Tobacco Road CHICAGO. Oct. It (AT) Cornel Iw tha Bdwy. aumeM bit that teeco bU." tbt pkj Mayw J. EeHly m nam tilth; Hill itar CaMweH'i pietwe if lift UM Cnyam- it uM J. GarrUr, rwenttat Ike Bhibert IntonM bere, afreet! M. daw the Aw arter a OMfenlM with Marw Rally, Our Sir Samuel Hoare, For- eign Secretary, In Plea to Italy Not to Press Conflict In Africa By the Associated Preii. British government, leader in league of nations sanc- tions against Italy for its ag- greuion in Ethiopia, left the way open today for an end to hostilities in East Africa. Opening debate in parliament on the Afro-European crisis, foreign secretary Sir Samuel Hoare declared 'Britain had never turned iti back on a peaceful solution. Bnathlni Space u Tilta. "There Is still breathing space be- tore the economic pressure can j per pound of lint cotton, effective u Cotton Tax Is Cut To 5.45c WASHINGTON, Oct. a.-Vn-K, reduction in the Bankhead cotton from he said. -'Can It not be used for another attempt at such As If In a direct plea to Mussollr not to pres; further in Ethiopia, th foreign secretary continued: "Italy Is still a member of th League of Nations. "I welcome this fact. Cannot thi be used to make to. proceed the unattractive road of-eoo- norolfl-aoUon against a fellow-pern her, an old.friend, a former alljrt" Banetibna.-unposed btethe of NatVons.Vwould virtually isola There wera indications Jrom Par and Home the efforts for peace wen definitely shaping up. It was ex plained II Dnce's terms for endln his conquest against Halle Selassie empire would be transmitted London, and then to the leagu through Premier Pierre Laval, France. While' Mussolini and Sir Eri Drummond. the British ambassa dor, have been trying to allay th tense feeling between Home an London, one of the day's develop ments was likely to add to th strained relationship. The Italians barred from clrcula tlon In Italy the London Dally Telegraph, a conservative newspa per and regarded In political circle .a the mouthpiece of Captain An thony Eden, Britain's leader a Oeneva. While an unconfirmed Exchange Telegraph report said the Ethlop ans suffered heavy losses in as- mlting the Italian lines, officla communiques said nil was quiet a ,he fronts. Drive Delayed Heavy rains In the southeasl Ethiopia desert area delayed the northward drive toward Harar ol he Roman legions under Genera Rudolfo Grazlonl. The Italian forces in the north if Ethiopia likewise were Inactive. Apparently, the northern forces Bee WAR, Page 3, Col. 4 Abilene and cloudy to- night uid cooler Wednesday. West of IIXMn meridian Partly cloudy, and treat portions ewhat colder In north tonleht and In extreme west portion Wednsgday, light to heavy Irosl In nprlh portion. 2ast of 100th meridian Partly cloudy, probably nhowers In north- porlJon tonlgljt and Wednesday; cool- er In extreme nnrlh portion tonight and irlh porllc.n Wednesday. Mon. p.m. 77 81 78 71 COOLER Dry thermometer Wet thermometer Ktlatlvt 0 flfl 74 10 71 78 11 m 78 Midnight 70 Noon........... 79 Sunrlne Sunset 7p.m. 7a.m. 56- Columbus Victim Had Been Attacked; Pair Guarded From Mob COLUMBUS, Oct. P. E. Hoegemeycr and Texas Rang- er E. M. Davenport said today two young negro larmhands had admit- ted the criminal attack and club- bing to death ol Miss Oeraldlnc Kollmnn, 19-year-old Columbus high school honor graduate, last Thurs- day. The negroes, Bennle Mitchell, 19. and Ernest Collins, 18, charged with criminal attack and murder, were rushed to the Harris county jail at Houston by Sheriff Hoegcmeycr and Davenport after reports of mob violence here. Sheriff Hoegemeyer said the negroes admitted encountering Mlos Kollman while she rode horseback on her father's property. They pull- ed her from the horse, struck her with an elm club, attacked her and See CONFESS, Pole 3, Col. 3 I Willie Saunders Sought In Investigation of Woman's Death LOUISVILLE, Ky., Oct. With Jockey Willie (Smokcy) Saun- ders of Kentucky Derby fame re- ported on his way to Louisville for questioning In the auto ride death of Mrs. Evelyn police con- centrated today Si a search for Tonl Sanl, an exercise boy. Detectives said the search for Sanl was given impetus by the statement of Elmore Danenhauer, business agent for Saunders and the Head- ey stables, to Baltimore detectives -hat Sanl was with Saunders here Saturday night a few hours before Mrs. Sllwinskl's death. Police named Saunders, who rode Omaha to victory In the 1035 derby, and Sanl as the men they wanted to question about the after-the- party slaying o( (he Louisville mar- ried woman. Saunden was report- SM SLAYING, Pwe 11, Col, of Oct. 31, was announced today by the AAA. The Bankhead law that a tax shall be collected on all cotton ginned In excess ol a national al- lotment. The AAA wid 10JO ctnti per pound had been determined u the average price of lint cotton "for a representative period." TiM Bmnkhead law prorttaj that UN tax Hull M per cent Of avtraft. market price of 7-1 took mot cotton on 10 iVjiot for a pctM. the tat five ctnti jnr powid, tlfltatej from f pound. Wi'h this reductfi farm aojninlstratlon said the s surplus cotton tax exemption cer- tificate poo] has been closed and the regular 1935 national pool will be opened soon. These pools were set up by tot AAA to permit a grower who did not produce the lull amount of allotment to sell his tax exemption certificates for the balance. Producers 'who grow more thtn their allotments rr.ay buy' tax ex- emption certificates from the pool at a rate lower than the actual tax. The AAA said' the special pool would have dosed on Nov. 7. but ;hat sales terminated Saturday and the pool will be liquidated u soon as Its operations cin be audited. Selassie Denies Italy Used Gas, Dum Dum Bullets (Copyrfffhl, 1M5. AMuelifed ADDIS ABABA, Oct. Z2.-Emper- or Halle Selassie declared to thli correspondent today that, despite reports to the contrary abroad, the :tallnn army In Its advance Into Ethiopia had not, up to this date, used either poison gas or dum dum bullets. Texas Pacific Officials Here Three Texas Pacific Railway are In Abilene today look- Ing over facilities of the line here to business trip that is carrying thtm ver Uie entire T, P. route. The officers, traveling In a pri- ate railway coach, are R. D. Earl, encral manager; J. J. Prindergast, lechanlcal superintendent; and A, Pistole, superintendent. They will avc for Dallas at 4 o'clock this ftemoon. C. Milquetoast Turns Robber SAN JOSE, Calif., Oct. police sought a faint-hearted hold- up man here lost night. Manuel Nunes of Centervtlle was getting into his automobile. The bandit shoved a gun against nil ribs. "Drive on down the he commanded Nunes. "I Nunes retorted. "Well, give me your money Uien.' "No." "Qlve me "I won't." "A dollar then." "No." "Well, dam said the cd bandit, "O. K. I cuff ahott yoti." And awty he ran.   

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