Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Abilene Daily Reporter Newspaper Archive: October 3, 1935 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Abilene Daily Reporter

Location: Abilene, Texas

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Daily Reporter, The (Newspaper) - October 3, 1935, Abilene, Texas                               FAIR "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES, WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT VOL. LV. Fun Leased Wires of Awodated Press United Pren (UP) ABILENE, TEXAS, THURSDAY, OCTOBER TWELVE PAGES (Evening Edition of The Abfcnt Kenring RUHflEfl 104 WAR IS ON: ETHIOPIA BOMBED Tigers Square Series, Defeating Cubs 8 To 3 Detroiters Hit Freely licago........000 010 etrolt......... 400 300 H 6 9 NAVTN FIELD. Detroit, Oct. 3.-The Detroit Ttfas came tack witt a vengeance today, hummcrlni three Chicago pitchers to win the Mc of the World scries. Tlfe score TVM 8 to 3, and the DetroH made the Mnes all Chai-ley Root of the Cubs was blasted out of the box in the firat ft Held, SEVENTH INNING filed out to White Jurges walked. Kowalik got an in leld hit. Galan out, Gehringer to ireenberg. Herman singled to left scoring Jurges and Kowalik. Lind trom popped to Greenberg. Two runs, two hits, ho errors. walked. Geh- ringer forced Cochrane at second o a grounder to third. Greenberg was hit by a pitched ball. Goslln lied to Galan. Pox singled througt he box, Gehringer scoring bu Greenberg was tagged at the plate One run one hit no errors. EIGHTH INNING filed to Cox. De- maree lined to Owens. Cavarretta hoisted to Fox. No runs, no hits, no errors. doubled to right field. Owen was tossed out at first as Rogell took third. Bridges fan- ned. White out, Hartnet to Cavar- retta. No runs, one hit, no errors. NINTH INNING singled to center. Jurges popped to Rogell. Klein, bat- ting for Kowalik lifted to Goslln. Galan flied to Fox. No runs one hit; Damage In Mexia Blaze MEXIA, Oct. Mexia company's entire plani, bales of cotton and 11 fri cars were burning unchecked here this afternoon In a fire that com- pany officials estimated would total about The blaze started shortly after noon and despite efforts of firemen it spread quickly and threatened to- tal loss. Firemen concentrated on prevent- ing the spread to an oil mill a few paces from the blazing structure. Officials Bald a new high density press had been Installed at the plant only last year. Pat 'Fain is manager of the firm. Jewels Taken In Memphis Robbery MEMPHIS, Tenn., Oct. Two men today held up the S. Friedlander Jewelry store here and escaped on foot with Jewels valued at between anil Two employes of the store were bound. ttu this.case are the Kerr-Smlth tobac- co control act and the section o] the AAA amendments passed last session to tux potato production In excess of a definite quota, All these laws -have been passed since Presi' dent Roosevelt took office. The Bankehad act Imposed a tax of 50 per cent of the market price 'of .all-BptSajj guinea above, a fixed ouota'. To show; 'compliance, with the act. a groSer must attach a certif- icate to the. cotton. saying it either Is or the tax has been paid. Lee "a Clint, Texas, cotton In asking the supreme court to -pass on the- dismissal of his suit by lower courts, asserted: "It Is imperative that an authori- tative decision be now this court showing just how far congress may carry regimentation of agri- culture and business, x x x "The continuance of this legisla- tion Is Increasing, with enormous rapidity, the raising of cotton in foreign countries, and threatening the very existence of the principal southern Among other things. Moor con- tended the act violated the consti- tutional provision that no person should be deprived of property with- out due process of law. He originally brought suit against the Texas and New Orleans railroad to compel it to ship some of his cotton which had no tags. The federal district court at El Baso ruled that if he wanted to test the act he should Day the tax on the amount produced above his quota and bring suit to recover in the ground the amount had been unlawfully collected. The fifth circuit court of appeals eld that Moor could sue the rail- road for damages for Its refusal to ship the cotton. It said it was not convinced that congress had exceed- ed its power In passing the legisla- tion. IMETTER Says He Was Just 'Brag- ging' When He Wrote About Allred AUSTIN, Oct. George Purl, Dallas, 'opponent of chain stbfe taxation, today told a state senate committee .that when reifular -session of tha- Texas lature saying: "We are about to pui the governor In a position where there will be no reason nor excUse for any special tax session." "I just took advantage of getting in on a situation I. probably did not deserve Purl said. "I said 'we killed a bear'." J senators Insisted on knowing who were Included In "we'. Purl could not designate. A letter statement that the. side- tracking of new tax bills and pass- age of tax-tightening bills Instead i a "nice achievement for Lt. Gov. Walter Woodul" and that (Speaker) "Stevenson deserved a lion's share of the Purl de- fended. He said It was worthwhile 11 new taxes could be avoided by preventing evasion of old ones. The program Included bills to In- crease oil, gasoline, clgaret. liquor and beer tax collections. They were to produce to Sen. Tom Debcrry, Bogota, read figures for three months on oil and four months on clgaret to show the expected great revenue had not resulted. Figures were not given for gasoline. The beer bill was killed. Deberry estimated a year Income from the two cited. Purl denied there was basis for the letter's assertion that Lt. Gov. Woodul had called in the "third "He did not talk to me See PURL, Page 11, Col. 6 Italian Advance Starts Troops Crossing Rive Frontier and Bombing Planes Make Raids NO WORD YET ON RESERVOIR Tis Yet Unknown Whether President Has Signed Still unanswered is the question nxlously asked by Abllenians: Has President Roosevelt signed the ffPA's approval of the Phantom Hill reservoir project? In reply lo his urgent telegrams sking for news, Secretary T. N. carswell of the Abilene chamber of ommerce Thursday morning had his one from Lawrsncc Westbrook, onner Texan who Is now the as- Istant federal WPA administrator: "Today's status of the Fort Phan- tom Hill project is Works Fvogres? pprovfll on September 13. (signed) Lawrence Westbrook." If De president has signed, prob- bly It was on the eve of his de- arturc on his western tour, when undreds of approved applications ecelved his o. k. In that event, fter they are classified they will to the budget office and be looked 1 by the comptroller general. The' Abilene project is completely eady to go. Plant were fully made vi> yeara past, and the city has al- eady spent more than in cqulrlng land for the reservoir and ralnage area. Beginning of con- ruction could 'almost immediately, cUw 0; b In Washington. AAA STATUTE NOWJS VALID Federal Judge Rules Act Was Legalized By Amendment KANSAS cmr, Oct. eral District Judge Merrill E. Otis held today the agricultural adjust- ment act became constitutional only on August 24, the date It i amended by congress. Judge Otis' memorandum opinion on the act involved in processing taxes. Prior to August 24, said Judge Otis, 'the act was invalid and the processing tax Illegal because of an unauthorized delegation of leglsla- Ive (taxing) power. "The rates now In force, thcre- Judge Otis declared, "are the rates fixed by congress and not the rates fixed by the secretary of agrl- (Henry A. He ordered temporary Injunctions held by 24 western Missouri millers, meat packers and tobacco manufac- turers against Internal revenue col- lector Dan M. Nee dissolved as of Aug. 24 and thereafter. Disputed processing'taxes will re- main Impounded until trial of the on their merits. The dates will be set afwr the United State: supreme court rules, probably In Oc- tober, on constitutionality of the In Boston processing tu (CnDvrlKhl. man. Hv ITnltrd Pr> GENERAL HEADQUARTERS Italian Armies, in the Field (VI Italian advance inl Ethiopia was started this momlni The Initial objective was Aduwi lo the soulh of the'main Italia concentrallon area, where an Italia army Mpped to pieces 39 years ago. Croat Frontier. The Italians crossed the Mare river, frontier at widely separate poults, all converging In heavy col umns toward Aiuwn. Squadrons of bombing, flghtln and scout airplanes roared south ward from the Asmara area an over the Mareb river, topping grea rugged mountain peaks, for the an clent empire of the nev er conquered. The planes and the men unde them were headed for Aduwa as th chief objective, with Adlgrat, the east, and other similar points as minor, objectives whose occupatlo w.as'essential'to the plan ol strategy of Gen: Emtllo De Bono, commanc er-ln-chief of the colonial armies Aduwa was 30 miles to the sout ill the frontier, the was 18 miles.Mirth and miles east-'of Aduwfc Prominent among the squadrons of airplanes was the "desperate squadron of Count Galeazzo Clsno Benlto Mussolini's son-in-law. In another squadron were Mussolini' two sons, Bruno, 18, and Vlttorio 19. Fifteen giant Caproni bombers were In the fleet from one field alone. Many other airplanes, from other fields, took off'at the zen hour. The first troops took their posi. tlons during the night on the north shores of the Mareb river. Soon before dawn, skirmishers posted at Intervals along the river waded the shallow Mareb and with their bayoneted rifles ready, steppei across Into Ethiopian soil. The firs line of the army followed. In Rough Country. The army took off from the hill! on the Italian side of the Mareb at the end of fine stone roads which Italian workmen had hacked from the mountainsides over great prlci pices, at the end of e. new system of wells which had supplied them water, from the thousands an  conference 'between Premier frnl Md AnUiwy Eden, BrItbR rainliter fur Nation sffalrt, :Afc their ten- _ are In Ethiopia in order to estab- lish justification for an Italian con- quest. Early In tile day, Emperor Halle Selassls proclaimed the general mobilization of his sub- ects. The king of kings, whose general mobilization order set his native lol- owere on the march to the front, irotested to the league of nations; alleging a violation by Italy of Ethiopia's frontiers, and a rupture ol the league covenant. Basse Youm, governor of East Ti- re j.rovlLce, bordering on Italy's colony of Eritrea where nearly Quarter of a million Italian troops lave been massed, conveyed the 'irsi ness of the bombardment to .he emperor and reported that the results of the still-raging battle were unknown. Non-Combatants Killed. While historic Aduwa. Ethiopia's slept In the morning hours of today, Mussolini's airplanes bom- larded the city, the government an- nouncement said, as a prelude to what might prove one of the most bloody wars In the history of the dark continent of Africa. Word that numbers of women and children non-combatants were killed and injured horrified the king of kings, who dispatched his pro- cst to the league Immediately. The conquering lion of Judah was cportcd la have sent four regiments if soldiers to Aussa, to meet .n eventful Italian attack near Mus- a All, where the Ethiopian govern- ient said it had established that tnllan troops already had pene- ratcd. The emperor's proclamation was cad from the balcony of his pal- ce by his chancellor, Halle Wolde- oufe, after an emergency session of Sec ETHIOPIA, Page 3, Col. 4 "Mr. Eden and I of the day fcr the council. of eine. We hive rar- methods of procedure. We will continue In close collaboration at Geneva." Nation To Remain 'Un- entangled And Free He Declares ENROTJTE WITH PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT ON THE PACIFIC, Oct. Boosevelt cruised southward off the pacific coast of Mexico today after 'a review of the United States fleet and a sharp notice to the world of Amer- ica's determination to remain "un- mlangled and free." The president boarded the navy cruiser Houston late yesterday at. San Diego, and from it watched the naval demonstration, which ended at sunset. It was one of the most complete tactical exercises of the fleet. Off the Coronados Islands, just jver the boundary from the United States and still In sight of the lights of San Diego, Admiral Joseph M. leeves, commander of the fleet, de- parted to-return to his flagship. Then the Houston turned south- Sec ROOSEVELT, Uage S, Col. 3 LEAGUE COUNCIL SUMMONED TO DEAL WITH GRAVE CRISIS Meeting Scheduled Saturday; Notes Received From Both Nations; Matter ot Penalties to Be Discussed YOU CAN GET RESULTS with a Reporter-News Want-Ad and you can also get the best buy of the year on a Want-Ad. AH Classified Ads listed by P. M. Saturday will appear for SEVEN DAYS in the Morning, and Afternoon Editions for the price of our REGULAR THREE-DAY RATE, THONE 7211 A wecJdy Ad As Low As 9Dc (Cnnyrlitlil, Hy Unllrd GENEVA, Oct. 3 (UP) The League of Nations council was con- voked today for Saturday to deal with the gravest crisis in post war European history- No man at Geneva knew how long the peace of Europe could be pre- served. Ethiopia In n telegraphed appeal to the league protested that Italian airplanes had bombarded Aduwa and that the Italian army had crossed the March river southward Into Ethiopia. Italy sent a note announcing tlir.t because of alleged nggresslvc mflnl- of Ethiopian warriors: Italian government has been i Itoelf compelled to authorize tW I supreme command In Eritrea to take the necessary steps for de- fense." All league forces were mobilized at once. From all over Europe statesmen made hurried plans to fly to ihe league capital here. The problem that the league had to deal with, It was asserted, was that of an undeclared war by a lea- gue member in a league member. Article XVI of tha league ant provides specific penalties for such a war when the aggressor hM been determined. Starting wltb moral pressure, the penalties range through an economic and financial UK) I. 1   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication