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Abilene Daily Reporter: Wednesday, August 7, 1935 - Page 1

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   Abilene Daily Reporter, The (Newspaper) - August 7, 1935, Abilene, Texas                               FAIR gtoflrne Bail? H "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSL TO FRIENDS OR FOES, WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT ME noN VOL LIV. Fun Leased Wlret of Associated Press United Press (UP) ABILENE, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST TWELVE PAGES (Evenlnn Edition ol The AMene Morning News) NUMBER 231 Hot Words Fly As Hurley Grilled Women Disrobed, 30 Jailed In Dallas Riot REPUBLICAN HOPES SOAR Texas Heiress The fortune to which Mildred fount of Pel. Is heiress was said to total ore than for each ol her 14 years. Sale of an oil firm orrnnlied by her father, now SeS, added I. Yount fortune. The picture WM taken recently In her Colorado summer home. (Associated Press With Baroness" Maud von Thywen, was thr passenger h Prince Alexis Mdlvani ien the aqto he was drlvlnj In Spain hortled from a moun- tain road, killing him and ser- iously Injuring her. (Associated Press WN TEST IN RHODEKLAND Democrats Say Election o No Significance WASHINGTON, Aug. Republicans hailed- the Rhode Is- land election today as "the begin nine of the end" of the New Deal democrats claimed the resull lad "no national significance" anc predicted a Roosevelt victory in 136. The Rhode Island vote saw a New Deal candidate defeated by a repub- Ican for congress. Obviously Jubilant, Rep. Bertrand 1. Snell, N. Y, republican minoirty eader, said: "It is the beginning of the end of the New Deal. It was the first clear cut test on the New Deal since last election. "The fact that the people re- fused bond Issues necessary to ?WA allocations Is especially slgnlf- cant." But Rep. Eugene B. Crowe, D., id., vice-chairman of the demo- cratic national campaign commit- tee, minimized the importance of the effect on the national situation 'I do not think there is any na- tional political significance in said. "It is just one of these quirks, where a district reverts to Its former party. The southern central and western state will be solidly behind RooseVelt in 1936." itaverlcfc-'ttT': said -the election was Just like the south going democratic. "The administration is getting some undeserved unpopularity ihrough congress -emalnlng here tod long. It should go home Im- the Texans said. Republican Wins By of 9 to 7 PROVIDENCE, R. I., Aug. Island's republican orees have defeated the New Deal ty a ratio of more than 9 to 7, inal returns, from the special elec- ion In the first congressional dis- trict showed today. Complete returns from the 112 lection districts gave: Charles Francis Risk (R) Antonio Prince (D) Risk's majority Risk, a 37-year-old lawyer and ormer district Judge who never had eld a political office, will occupy le seat vacated by Francis B. Con- on, democrat, who was appointed ELECTIONS, Page 12, Col. 2 Locate Co-Ed "I've learned more than T could In four years at en- thuses Ann B. SJbley who disappeared a month ago from Antioch College at Yellow Springs, O. When found by de- tectives, the pretty Chicago co- ed was working- as a freak show barker in Coney Island, New York's famous amusement resort. Twelve hours a day, seven days week, she harangued pleasure seekers for a week. Post and Rogers Off For Alaska SEATTLE. Aug. Wiley i Post and WU1 Sogers, airplane' cronies, hopped from the Renton airport. 12 miles south of here at today, presumably for Juneau, Alaska, with Mrs. Post making a last-minute decision not to fly with them as the trip "may be too strenuous." Gust of Breeze Delays Wedding NEW YORK, Aug. 7. (IIP) Max SUffln, clutching a bill, led hfc Ctrl into the courthouse. They were after a marriage license. A Kurt of wind grabbed the bill, whisked It down the street. Stafrin went off In pur- suit, got In a dispute with a ne- rro youth who round It, had him arrested, appeared In court, and several hours later returned to the courthouse for his girl. The wedding is postponed Indefi- nitely. mm Strikers Gang Women Going to Work; Two Are Injured; Officer Loses His Coat PLOTINSIAM IS THWARTED Army Had Plotted Death For High Officials BANGKOK, Slam, Aug. A great insurrectionary plot aimed it the overthrow of the government with wholesale death lor officials, was reported uncovered today among Slam's defense forces-j A number of non-commissioned officers, who planned to slay their" as- sumecommand forces and seize the administration, were reported arrested. Prompt action by the government apparertly frustrated the scheme. It was not considered likely that the situation would become critical, although military forces were pa- iroUlng the streets of the capital. A special court was established o try the revolutionaries. Army Ships Stop at Abilene Port Eleven' Keystone bombers, piloted ay members of the cadet class at Kelly field in San Antonio, stopped t the local airport this morning en oute to Hensley Held between Fort Worth and Dallas. The army planes 111 return to San Antonio tonight- Pilots were Lieuts. Ashworth, Al- en. Dary, Shuck, Remington, Hill, leld, Smith, Right, Bockman and Hlknet. The first plane arrived at the port t and the llth came hi two ours later. The ships were to take ft for the second leg of the hop arly this afternoon. Drlscoll Given Plalnview Post AUSTIN, Aug. 7. H. E. Driscoll, former county relief ad- ministrator for Eastland county, to- day was named director at Plain- view to succeed E. J. Reed. Reed resigned to enter government secret servlce. DALLAS, Aug. 7. Four women were stripped naked and two others injured by striking women garment workers in a riot in front of two dress manufacturing; plants here today. Thirty Arrested Forty policeman, called to the scene when the rioting began, ar- rested 27 women and three men. The women fought the policemen, and succeeded In tearing the coat off Patrolman George Cox. Cox was badly scratched. The women Injured, both workers and strikers, were Nella Franklin, 35, and Jeanette Phillips. The neck of the former was sprained and the latter received a possible fractured shoulder as well as body injuries. The windshields of nine of the police squad cars which converged on the scene were broken In the melee. The strikers, with a number of spectators, gathered In front of the Lorch Manufacturing company and the Morten-Davis company .as .the. women workers arrived for the day. As each appeared someone would shout: "There's one. of 'em! Each time the strikers surged for ward. Police, who had arrived by tha time, succeeded in rushing t h stripped and Injured women Int the Lorch Manufacturing company Strike Six Months Old The strike began six months ago The women, who walked out of a! thirteen dress manufacturing plants here, demanded higher wages shorter hours and union recognition The first month or so there were several minor riots, and fights staged as the women who refuse! to strike and who took the strikers Blaze In U. S. S. Quincy Is Controlled After Five Hour Fight QUINCY, Mass., Aug. A fire In the engine room of the re- cently launched TJ. S. Quincy was extinguished early today after a five hour battle. places arrived for work. Each planl has been picketed most of. the time since the strike, and in addition Dallas stores selling clothing manu- factured by the thirteen plants have been picketed as "unfair." For the last few months, there has been little disorder, and part of the time some of the plants have not even been picketed: The out- break today was believed occasion- ed by the large number of out-of- town buyers here to buy their fall merchandise. The manufacturers said they had believed the difficulties between them and the strikers had been set- tled practically on Monday. At that time they said they agreed to permit all strikers to return to work with the exception of five or six who, they asserted, had been agita- tors and leaders In the strike. They laid today's rioting to these women who were not permitted to return to work. WORKONNEWBUTTERFIELD SCHOOL BUILDING UNDERWAY Dismantling of Old Schools at Caps and View Is Also Begun; Districts Recently Consolidated As work of two old school cording to state department of ed- Hamlln Youth's Name Added to Jamboree List Cans and in progress Wednesday, excavation for the foundation of the new con- solidated Buttcrfleld school was get- ting underway, at a site on the Butterfleld Trail highway, approxi- mately 10 miles southwest ol Abl- Consolldatlon of the two districts was effected In a recent election and a brick veneer structure with combination auditorium and gym- nasium is to replace the old build- ings. E. F. Chelf, Abilene contractor and native resident of the city Is In charge of construction, which Is to be completed by October I. Con- tract price Is J10.746, less credit al- lowed for the old buildings. Three crews of men were at work Wednesday, one each on the dis- mantling Jobs and one at the new site, where tool houses were being erected as the excavation got under way. Hauling of izravel was ilso in progress. Till new building, designed ac- ucation specifications, will contain five classrooms, In addition to the auditorium-gymnasium, which is to be 50 by 78 feet. Six-acre site for the school build- ing was staked Tuesday, on the See SCHOOLS, Pace 3, Col. 6 Abilene Schools To Open Sept. 9j Abilene, public schmlf will open Monday, September 9, It was announced Wednesday by R- D. Green, superintendent. Date far the opening was selected by the board of trustees In B recent meeting. Mr. Greeu said announcement of lucher assignments would be made within short time. Name of Charles Prater, Hamlln Boy Scout. Wednesday was added to list of Chisholm Trail delegates who will trek to Washington, D. C., for the national Jamboree, opening Au- gust 21. He was registered here Wednesday as 27th of 32 delegates allowed the area. Mrs. C. A. Prater, mother of the youth, said It Is probable one or two other Hamlln scouts will reg- ister for the trip. The Jamboree Is 'open to. first and second class scouts with camping experience who have received rec- ommendations of their scoutmaster and troop committee. Young Prater Is a member of Hamlln's troop No. 15. Two Die, 3 Hurt In Grade Crash BATON ROUGE, La., Aug. E. Hardtner, wealthy Alex- andria, La., oil.and lumberman, and Lynn Blchey, until recently Alexan- dria city attorney, were fatally In- jured today and three young girls were badly hurt, In a grade cross- ing automobile crash, Hardtner was a former .ur.ie senator. The girls were Henrietta Hardt- ner, daughter of the dead man; ,of. were so ndt th'at'-Offlclals we're' un- able to go below to determine the extent of damage. Fire Chief Wil- liam J. Bands said he believed damage would "run high." The cruls' lay at a dock at the Fore River ship yards of the Bethlehem Shipbuilding cor- poration, where she was getting pre- pared lor her trial run. She had Former Cabinet Member Denies Lobbying; Was Representing Stock- holders, He Says WASHINGTON, Aug. a hearing punctuat- ed by frequent clashes, Patrick Hurley, Hoover secretary of war, testified to the senate lob- by committee today his law firm had received in the last three years from the Two A re Trapped On Narrow Ledges InYosemitePark Gas and Electric Prosecutors been launched at Fore River plant June 19. jHarry E. D. Gould, general man- iger of River plant, said the fire was believed to have start- ed In the switchboard of the main cable room, a 60 by 80 foot section at the aft end of the engine room. Beyond that, he declined to dis- cuss the blaze. He said, however, that a board of Bethlehem and navy officials would investigate to- day. Tlie navy officials, he said, would Associated system. Explaining he represented the shareholders, he asserted: "I've never taken a case from anyone that was Incompatible with the public welfare and these share- holders have a constitutional right to my services." During one of the frequent alter- cations with committee members, the outspoken Hurley shouted: "Oh, yes, you gentlemen are all prosecutors." Frequently he accused comnilttee- men of "putting words in my mouth" and at one, point inquired nat. gsk- ealTng his wife. "I am a gold fish In a he shouted another time. "You can see me from any angle." Hurley said he received for appearing before the senate banking committee year before last, the following year for rep- resenting the associated before the trade commission and In other mat- ters and this year for aid- ing in its activities against the util- ity hill. Denies Lobbying Hurley denied he ever had lob- bled. The former cabinet officer alter- See LOBBY PHOBE, Tiff 12, Col. routlci Accused Big Lake Deputy Resigns BIG LAKE, Aug. Mack Shipley of Big Lake, charged at be Admiral Paul senior San Angelo with the Wiling of two- navy officer stationed at the plant, and Captain C. C. Simmons, navy superintendent o f construction there. No Outsiders Allowed Only company and navy officials and were allowei.- the shipyard. Word of the blaze was not re- ceived outside the yard until some hours after It had been discovered. Yard workmen attempted to ex- inguish the fire with the ship- building company's apparatus, and after about three hours of unsuc- .essful battling called In the Quincy ire department. Acrid, heavy smoke billowed from nglnp. room openings and firemen worked in groups of three for pe- riods of five minutes as they sought o reach the seat ri the fire. The deck plates were so hot, they -ere unable to get within two decks f the engine room and clouds of See FIRE, Page 12, Col. 1 year-old Woodrow Wllllngham. and at liberty under bond, has resigned as deputy sheriff under Sheriff A. W. Blllingsley of Reagan county. The child was killed 10 days ago when a shot was fired Into the car of J. W. Wllllngham. ST., at a road house near here following a dispute between Wllllngham and Shipley. PO'K CHOPS SHO' HIGH FORT WORTH, Aug. 7. Hogs climbed on the Fort Worth livestock market-today to a hundredweight, a rise of 15 cenis over the six-year record of established yesterday. Mountain Veterans Star Efforts to Rescue Ma- rooned Hikers YOSEMITE, Calif.. Aug. Two hikers trapped on the preclp tons face of Yosemlte's famous Ha Dome were reached by rangers th morning. Decision was reached lower them from the rocky ledge In stead of hoisting- them. No repo on their condition was Immediate available. The hikers, trapped yesterdi when they attempted a short cu are Miss Elizabeth Lorlmer. 23, Chlcopee, Mass., and Robert Pal 35, of Inglewood, Calif. Rangers said it would take seve al hours to complete the rescue. YOSEMTTE VAL1-EY, Cal.. A.i park rangers foug their way toward the bald summ. of Half Dome today, seeking to re cue hikers trapped on narrow rot ledges high above the valley floe on the precipitous side of the foot granite peak. Cold and weary after spsndln the night on their precarious perch es, Miss Elizabeth Lorlmer, 23. Chi copee, Mass., and Robert Fate, Inglewood, Cal., clung desperate to the ledges while friends and re atives far below shout-d encourage rr.ent through megaphones. Rescue Party The rescue party, comprised the valley's most expert mountain eers, expected to reach their dest nation some time after noon. The will begin the final efforts to sav the pair from the certain deal awaiting them should they make misstep and plunge from the. -The girl a-cock-shell feet below Fate. Their plight learned about 6 p. m. yesterday whe they managed to llglsl signal fires which were sighted from the valle floor. None .knew haw long they ha been struggling to find a path dow the mountain before calling for aid Apparently they had a few matches, for brush fires they light ed In the meagre vegetation calle attention to their plight last nigh But there was not enough wood tc keep them warm. Lake Sound Board Rangers went Immediately to Mir ror Lake and celled to them throug: megaphones. Mirror Lake formed a sounding board for their replies They told of their positions, al though Pate's responses were some what garbled. Apparently he See MAROONED, Page 12, Col. To Halt Trek of Jews to Berlin BERLIN, Aug. offic- ial Nazi announcement proclaimet today that further "measures" wouh be taken to halt a stream of "un desirable especially Jews pouring Into Berlin lor refuge. The announcement said the meas- ures already have been drawn up by Count Wolf Hendrlck Von Hell- dorf, head of the Berlin police, and Julius Lippert, Nazi commissioner 'or Berlin, to stem the migration Tom the than ever before." No indication was given as to the precise nature of the steps to be ,aken. Jeanie Holbrrxik, Spangler, 13. and Frances Truck Held Up By Gunmen Is Found; Liquor Is Missing A truck commandeered Monday near Albany by three masked gun- men who kidnaped the drivers and confiscated a load of pre- scription whiskey, was found late Tuesday, empty and abandoned, at Roanoke, between Fort Worth and Denton. While no arrests had been report- ed, It was said Johnson county of- ficers were attempting to link a res- ident of that county with the rob- bery. Drivers of the truck, Sam Morris and A. B. Harley, employes of the West Texas Drug company of Big Spring, reported the holdup to Sheriff Oran Smith at Cleburne, after they had been left tied In a field near that city, Monday at midnight. They told officers they were bound and their eyes taped before being taken on a six-hour rifle In the gunmen's automobile. One of the lold-up men drove their truck away, they uld. Draw Battle Lines For Ginners Fight Moody Represents Group Seeking Modification Of Court Ruling HOUSTON, Aug. lines were drawn today between two groups of Texas cotton. glnners as their fight o-ver an injunction re- straining enforcement of. the Bank- head act moved toward federal court. Hearing In the case., in which one group seeks modification and the other wants an extension of Federal Judge Randolph Bryant's order figalnst enfrrcement ol the cotton regulation measure, was set for tomorrow In federal court here. Moody Attorney The Texas Agricultural associa- tion, champion of the AAA program, announced retention of former Gov- ernor Dan Moody to represent giu- ners seeking exemption from the Injunction, while members of the Texas CotUm Dinners association gee DINNERS, Face 1, Col. I FAMILY FEUD IN ETHIOPIA Crown Prince Disagrees With Father's Policy IN Dptir Trinity Baptist to Be Scene of Session at 8 O'clock Tonight Abllene's first rally of United Youth, an organization sponsored by the Texas League Against key, will be held tonight at 8 o'- clock at Trinity Baptist church. with a squadron of speakers from the state headquarters at Waco. The workers, who launched a rles of West Texas meeting! last night at Brownwood, were expected to arrive at mid-afternoon, with Woodson Armes, college division leader, heading the group. In the party are Sybil Leonard of Belton and Lawrence Lumpkln and [rs. P. Z, Bryan of Waco. Qeraldlne Hill, chairman of rally arrangements. Is to preside for program, which will Include uuplr rational addresses and prohibition songs. District, county and city dry leaders have been invited to occupy the platform with the vlslUnf speakers. In this group will Thomas E. Hayden, Jr., Mth toAl-dlstrict. organizer -of- U Dry Forces; Bryan Bradbury, representative, who is Taylor coun- ty Chairman; W. A... Stephenun, city chairman; Clarence Pennington and J. Owen Shelton, finance conv mltteemen; Mrs. John Dressen, wo- men's chairman; Mrs. Morgan Jones, president of the local Wo- men's Christian Temperance Union, and Mrs. C. C. Stewart, also a rep- resentative of the WCTU. Miss Hill has Invited all younf >eople of the city, especially mem- bers of the Christian Endeavor, Ep- worth League, Baptist Training Jnlon and other church organlza- lons to attend the rally. The Youth Squadron will go to Lubbock for a meeting Thursday night. Other West Texas points scheduled are Platartew, Friday; :anyon, Saturday; Vemon and Wichita Falls, Sunday. Rev. Vlrgu Reynolds, pastor of Trinity church, has announced that open air revival he Is conduct- ng at Second and Butternut streets, lll be suspended tonight In order aat the congregation may attend the rally. Change In Dove Season Is Sought By West Texans SAN ANGELO, Aug. 'exas sportsmen today took steps a have changed the new federal emulations which prohibit dove unting until Oct. 1. The Tom Green county game and Ish Protective association wired J. (Ding) DarJIng, head of the bu- eau of biological survey at Wash- igton, that "we have the biggest ove crop in years In this section ut if we can't hunt them until Oct. they will all be gone." West Texas sportsmen, accustom- d to starting dove hunting Sept. 1, Id today, "it nmounts to this ic federal season Is not changed upper West Texas, then South exas and Mexico will get all the wes and we won't even get our ins warm." PARIS. Aug. feud In the of Emperor Halle Se- lassie was reported today In a dis- patch to the newspaper Le Matin from Asmara, Eritrea, to be threat- ening to split Ethiopia. The Ethiopian heir apparent, Asfao Tafarl, was reported to be embittered nt preference shown to ils younger brother, Makonnen, who was appointed governor of Harrar province, nnd to disapprove of the emperor's Italian policy. The dispatch said that Asfao Tafarl, governor of Wollo province, was turning more and more aginst its father dally P.nd that an open See ETHIOPIA, Fate J, CoL 1 Abilene and Gtnernllv fair to- -West of 100th meridian lonlghl and Thursday. East of 100th meridian tonlBht and Thursday. Trmperadim Tuen. Wed. 83 D5 98 OS f.O 85 SI SO r-i Dry thermometer Wet thermometer JUIttlve humidity lf> ?l Mldn'Khl T9 93 Sunrise 7p.m. 7a.rn. 73- Jg- H- TO- ,m Ml   

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