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Abilene Daily Reporter Newspaper Archive: August 6, 1935 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Daily Reporter

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Daily Reporter, The (Newspaper) - August 6, 1935, Abilene, Texas                               CLO ITLY IDY Bail? Reporter "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES, WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT ME flON L LIV. Fufl Leased Wires of Associated Press United Press (UP) ABILENE, TEXAS, TUESDAY, AUGUST PAGES (Evening Edition of The AbfcM Homing News) NUMBER 231 Senate Chiefs Block Bonus Issue Shipment Of Liquor Is Hijacked Near Albany Clinging to Murder Denial His eyes downcast, obviously tired under loaf noun of questioning, Nanderllle Zenge is shown, right, as he stubbornly denied to Cblcaco police any knowledge of the mutilation operation white killed his successful rival for the hand of Louise Schaffer, pretty Klriuville, Mo., nurse. Dr. Harry R. Hoffman, left, of the Cook county criminal court behavior clinic, watches the prisoner Intently. Italy Calls lore Men To Arms punter to Make Talk for Repeal DALLAS, F. Hauler at Wichita Falls, twice a candidate for governor of Tex- as, will deliver a radio address here Thursday night advocating repeal of the. state constitutional prohibition amendment, C. L. Wakefleld, Head of the Dallas county repeal forces said today. "Hnnter ifl-atQl personally dry and against Wakefleld asserted, "but he Is now convinc- ed that the best thing to do Is to regulate liquor traffic, rather than try to suppress It." PLrJf ZENGE Hearing For Suspect In Slaying Is Set For Aug. 20 CHICAGO, Aug. ville W. Zenge, young Missouri car- penter, today pleaded innocent to the charge that he murdered Dr. Walter J. Bauer, Klrksville, Mo., os- teopath, by mutilation. The plea first was entered ir. Zenge's behalf by his attorney, Jos- eph Green, when the prisoner arraigned before Judge Justin F. McCarthy in felony court. Judge McCarthy then asked Zenge if he wished to make a plea personally. Zenge said he did, and pleaded in- nocent. He was remanded to the custody of the sheriff and taken from state's attorney's officials, who In five days of questioning had been unable to shake his contention that he knew nothing of the death of Dr. Bauer. At the state's request. Judge Mc- See ZENGE, 9, Col. 7 Farm Agent For Santa Fe Is Dead AMARILLO, Aug. scheduled at 7 p. m. for J. D. Tlnsley. 65, general agrtrulturp.l agent for the Santa Fe Railroad company since 1923. He died Monday. Formerly associated with New Mexico A. M. college, Tlnsley had been in failing health for several months. He was survived by his widow, two tntfem, ud two Paper Says League Efforts of No Importance and War Inevitable Three Masked Men Seiz Load Valued at Consigned To Firm A Big Spring Three masked gunmen Mon day afternoon coniiscated a 500 load of legal whiskey nea Mbany and the truck on which t was being consigned to a Bi spring drug company, kidnapei the two drivers and releasei them during the night, bouni ind gagged, in a field nea Cleburne. First report of the hijacking wa received here from Big Spring, In a telephone call from Andrew Mer rick. Howard county deputy sheriff to the Taylor county sheriff's de partment. The truck drivers. Sam Morris, 25 and. A. B. Harley, 25, employes o the West Texas Wholesale Dru company at Big Spring, were forced from their machine by the bandits and taken In an automobile to th place where they were left, between Grandvlew and Clebume. They sue ceeded In freeing themselves shortl after midnight. and walked to farmhouse, where they called Bher iff Oran Smith, at Cleburne. The truck carried 142 caies of n -liquor, consign BOMB, Aug. Mussolini today called more men to arms "as a consequence of heavy Ethiopian mobilizations.1 Specifically, he ordered the mobil- ization of two regular army divi- sions and a volunteer fascist black- shirt division and created two re- placement divisions. T .j-expected "communique increase ed to the West Texas Drug compan of Big Spring. Officials of. th company Tuesday estimated the loss at Press dispatches from Cleburn said no definite trace of the robbe: had been found, but that Sherlf fi I Smith had several clues which h fA the army, commanded by General Rlccardi has been called. The newspaper Popoli Di Roma published today a long dispatch from Addis Ababa describing Ethiopian military preparations. The dispatch said "great concen- tration" of troops was in progress In the vicinity of the Ethiopian cap- ital, near Harrar. The same article ascribed to dip- lomatic circles at Addis Ababa the opinion that league of nations activ- tles were of "scant importance" and Jiat 'hostilities were Inevitable." believed would lead to establish ment of their Identity. -The men were wearing..-handker chiefs tied over their faces, accord ing to reports. The hold-Tip' occur red five miles west of Albany, be- tween 4 and 5 o'clock. RELIEF HEAD AT NEW POST R. C. Conly Greeting Loca Personnel EX-CONVICT SLAIN ST. LOUIS, Aug. 6. tives shot and killed Clarence Henry, 20, ex-convict, in a raid on his home last night. Henry was sought In connection with eight re- cent drug store holdups. R. C. Conly, newly appointed re- lief director for district I3-A, was making acquaintances In the Taylor county office this morning before launching the six-county program under the new Texas relief set-up. First business facing the new di- rector, who arrived here late last night from his home In Dalnger- field, will be approval of office per- sonnel. Within the next few days Conly will visit relief headquarters in Callahan, Eastland, Jones, Shackelford and Stephens counties See CONLY, Pace 8, Col. T FEAR OF LOSING OLYMPICS IS BEHIND NAZI DRIVE AGAINST FOREIGN WRITERS; PLOT SEEN BERLIN, Aug. author- itative source expressed the belief today that fear of losing the 1936 Olympic games because of the cam- paign against Jews and Catholicism" lay behind "political Nazi at- tempts to obstruct foreign corres- pondents. Loss of the games at Berlin would come close to being a major set- back for the Nazi regime, econom- ically as well as politically. Millions of marks are being spent on preparations, with officials counting on an influx of foreign money to simulate declining busi- ness. Informed sources said certain Nazi quarters were convinced that there existed among foreign cor- respondents a scheme to have the International committee cancel the rames. The ousting of some newspaper- men and the influencing of those remaining against sending abroad reports of the attacks against Jews said authoritatively to be the meth- od of Dr. Paul Joseph Goebbels, minister of propaganda, for dealing with the alleged plot. Members of the foreign press as- sociation said they were mystified as to why government officials should believe charges of the ex- istence of any plot. The authoritative source said, however, that the Olympics stand as the center of present Nazi ob- jectives, and anything which ap- pears to endanger their success Is HJtely to suffer blows. Besides the building of a whole city at Doberltz and houses at Kiel for boat training, as well ss ex- penditures at Garmlsch and 'Part- enklrschen for winter sports, crews of laborers already are brushing up the capital. Although the foreign reaction to the drive en Jews and political Catholicism was r-sld to be feared, Goebbels himself asserted In a re- cent address that the attacks would pnlK. Washington Hotels A re Combed In Vain For Elusive Hopson WASHINGTON, Aug. Congrssional investigators, hot-foot- ing it on the trail of elusive Howard C. Hopson, sped up and down the corridors of a couple of ritzy hotels today, but failed to subpoena the Associated Gas and Electric Co. of- ficial to testify In the lobby inquiry. In Capital Last Night It was Dapper Bernard B. Robin- son of Chicago, who started the wild goose chase by a smile and a he had j talked to Hopson only last night at the Shoreham hotel. "It was a new experience for the Chicago securities dealer con- fided to the congressmen who have been seeking Hopson for weeks. "Mr. he said, "is short, very stout, bald, with a fine dispo- sition. You couldn't miss him." "We don't intend to miss Chairman John J. O'Connor replied firmly, sending a couple of men with subpoenas to the hotel. "They missed him. Even with the help of newspaper reporters and photographers, and the uninvited aid of a subpoena bearer from the senate lobby com- mittee, they failed to find a trace of Hopson in a hare and hounds chase through the fourth floor cor- ridors of the Shoreman hotel and another hot the fashionable Mayflower hotel. Robinson had described the "short, very stout" man as reclin- ing on a soft, talking to a golf In- structor and expressing himself as quite wiil'jig !o testify before the committee. The committee icpresentatlves ar- rived confident of finding and re- turning with him to the house lobby hearing, which later recessed while See LOBBY PROBE, Page 9, K Trade Staging Comeback Is Opinion of-Two Con- vention.Groups KANSAS CITY, Aug. Midwest Retail Merchants Council gathered in Kansas City felt the pulse of business and decided trade Ls staging a comeback. Better times were seen by dele gates to the 22nd annual meetin From Kansas, Missouri, and Okla homa. The council president, E. A. De ;rick of Caldwell, Kas., said condl tions are "the best since 1929. Why business better? Better price for the farmers. I'm judging b; Jaldwell, a farm community. The general level of farm prices Is U] enough to encourage fanners to bu; more merchandise than they bough ast year and for several preceding 'ears." Jumping down to Oklahoma, the rade roundup gathered more gooc news. Miss Lula Holcomb, who has a adles' apparel shop In Stlllwater n out of goods. "My business has been good all she reported, "it stayed up better than I expected and bet- fir than Stlllwater merchants ex- ected. We ran out of goods. We ould have sold more. 'We're building new houses at tlllwater. Yes, and we struck an U well a few weeks ago." New York Police Say {Judge Who Vanished NEW YORK, Aug. Su- preme Court Justice Joseph Force Crater, whose disappearance creat- ed the mystery, of a 'century. Is alive, Detective Joseph Von Wiesen- Bonus Legislation Made Special Order of Busi- ness When Next Ses- sion Convenes WASHINGTON, Aug. majority leader Joseph T. Robinson announced today that the democratic steer- ing committee had decided to make bonus legislation a spe- cial order of business when congress reconvenes next Jan- uary. To Be Tabled Robinson said the committee felt such a policy would facilitate early adjournment by discouraging efforts to attach bonus or other riders to the pending tax bill. If the riders are offered, Robin- son said, he had been given author- ity to move to table them. The decision of the leadership.appeared to doom to fall ure any further efforts for bonu enactment this session. Other In flatlonary measures, which with, the bonus aggregate som also were bellevafc by leaders to be shelved: Sen.'Blmer b, Okla however, said bonus forces wire no dismayed and would still offer i bonus rider to the tax bill. The bon- us bloc will meet tonight to dlscusi the situation. Sen. Thomas P. Qore, D.. Okla. said that between now and January Monkey Put to Death and Frozen Solid, Is Restored to Life HOLLYWOOD, Cillf.. Ralph Wlllnd, a na- tive of the Ruului State Gewtla, who now directs a clin- ical laboratory here, Monday ex- hibited a male Rhesus monkey named Jekal which he uld he had resuscitated after having rroien It ioUd but Friday. Another monkey, Matilda, did not reipond to Dr. Wlllard'i technique, and a Gallon, was still In the aero-cold cham- ber of an electric Ico machine from which Dr. Wlllard said he will take It In a few days. Several months ago Dr. Wll- lard announced success In simi- lar experiments with guinea plffs, bnt his decision to work with dogs brought sharp protests from rarlous humane orffanlutloni. Dr. WUlar. saM h ut to bring down the cost of avla- lon and build safer planes. The model he is flying, powered with a Menasco motor, was con- tructed at cost of he said. Oelsse was to take off immedlate- y after lunch for Dallas, where he ixpected to spend the night. Oelsse took off In his bobtail llane from the El Paso airfield at :30 a. m. Abilene land- Ing at Midland at and depart- ing at o'clock. The plane, designed by Waldo Vatemian to meet the government's uggestlon for an inexpensive, easily landled ship, Is being flown from See AIRPLANE, Page 9, Col. 1 Juilding Totals Up 98 Per Cent AUSTIN, Aug. ulldlng permits during the first x months of 1935 were 68 per cent bove those of the corresponding In 1934, the University of exas bureau of business research Monday. Records from 40 leading cities howed June permits were 50.4 per ent higher than the total granted June, 1934. The amount was 4.7 per cent less than In May, owever. Cities showing Increases for all orresponding periods Included Big prlng, El Paso, and Fort Worth. Another business Indicator, textile utput, showed a 28 per cent Ine during the first six month! impared to the like period a year ;o. consumption of cotton, pro- uctlxm, sales, and unfilled orders I compared unfavorably with UM Irst moatba or 1M4.   

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