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Abilene Daily Reporter: Tuesday, July 30, 1935 - Page 1

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   Abilene Daily Reporter, The (Newspaper) - July 30, 1935, Abilene, Texas                               CIO tTLY IDY "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES, WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT H EDI noN VOL LIV. Fufl Leased Wlni of Associated Press United Press (UP) ABILENE, TEXAS, TUESDAY, JULY TEN PAGES (Evening Edition of The Abilene Morning News) NUMBER 233 Germany Protests Flag Incident House Committee Approves New Tax Bill Convict Author Repays Victims Joe Rusted, Cleveland "loiitt bandit terrorist" set-vine 55 yean In Ohio penitentiary, is paying back victims of his holdups with money obtained by writing newspaper textures. He tpendi most of his time at the typewriter. (Associated Frew TO SEEK PASSAGE Baby Slain; Reagan Deputy Is Charged James And Staff Moving Half-Block East To Park Building Tuesday is moving day for Abi- lene headquarters office of Works Progress district 13, equipment and records being taken one-half block east from Director W. S. James South First street office to the Park building. Oak and South First streets. Permanency of the new location is subject to acceptance of the sealed bid tendered by owners of the property to the works progress administration, according to state- ment from the local office. It was said, however, that the rental of- fer was the lowest received. Director James and department heads are winding up work on se- lection of clerical personnel for the office, but permanency of em- ploy, likewise, is subject to con- firmation of appointment by state headquarters office at San Antonio, It was said. John M. Hendrix, assistant di- rector, disclosed that several appli- cations for projects have been filed the office, Including several Eastland county. W. F. Gil- secretary of the Kent county relief board, and D. J. Kellett of Jayton were in conference with the director today relative to a pro- ject proposed for the Jayton public schools. Bullet- Strikes Child As He With Father SAN ANQELO, July Charges of murder were filed today against Mack Reagan county deputy sheriff, for. the kill- ing early today of 2-year-old Wod- row Wllllngham near a San Ange- lo road house. J. W. Wllllngham, father of the child, and Shipley had ah alterca- tion In the resort prior to the shoot- police said. Willlnsham said he got in .the car, to take his son home and had driven but a short distance when someone started shooting at the car. One of the slugs tore through the back of the machine where the child was asleep, striking him in the stomach. He died about o'clock at a hospital. Shipley surrendered to officers at mldmorning. He -had been ques- tioned at the scene but was not brought to town by officers at the time. American Spies Sent to Prison July 30.- George Mink and Nicholas Sherman, who claim to be Americans, were sentenced today by the Danish ap- peal court to 18 months In prison for espionage against Denmark. It was the only sentence published by the court and few details of the case are known. (Sherman and Mink were report- ed arrested 'fflth six other men last March 6 In Denmark on charges possessing false passports. One oth- er supposed American, a man who (rave the name of Josephson, was In the Russian Ready to Make U. S. Flight OSCOW, July All prepua- s for sigmund Levaneffaky's over-tHe-pole flight to San Fran- cisco are completed, the takeoff de- pending only on favorable weather. Official announcement also said reports from the Arctic Indicate that meteorological conditions wll" it ttJU Hurst Couple Die In Auto Accident FORT WORTH, July Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Parr, both 27, of Hurst, were fatally Injured early today when their light truck col- lided with a heavier machine on the Fort Worth-Dallas pike. Their three year old daughter. Dorris Ann, was thrown clear of the wreckage and was unhurt. The deaths brought Tarrant coun- ty's traffic toll to 54 for the year- five this week. Share Wealth Measure Is Expected To Bring In to the TreasOry Annually WASHINGTON, July new tax bill was formally approved today by the house ways and means committee. Passage By Saturday Chairman Doughton (D-NC) hop- ed to get the measure up on the floor tomorrow. He said that If he failed It would be taken up "Thurs- day at the latest." "I hope we can get It passed by oughton added. "If we don't, we certainly can get it through by Monday." The bill Includes recommenda- tions outlined by President Roose- velt In his message to congress June 19 advocating a "wider distribution of wealth." It embodies new taxes on Inher- itances and gifts, in addition to those already levied on estates and gifts; Increased taxes on Individual Incomes and corporation excess profits and graduated'- levies on cor- poration net Incomes'. were that republican and means committee would file a minority re- port criticizing the bill because of the contention it would do nothing worth while toward balancing the budget. Vole 17 to 7 Although less than a dozen com- mttteemen were present when the rote was taken, all but one of the absentees left a proxy. The result- Ing vote was 17 to 7, with the dem- ocrats agreeing solidly to approve the bill and the republicans to op- pose It. The only member not recorded WOE Representative Lamneck (D- Ohlo) who Is 111. There ,had been forecasts that an attempt would be made in the committee to permit corporations to deduct from their taxable Income gifts made to community chests and charitable organizations not operat- See TAX BILL, Page 9, Col. 6 Seven Killed as Auto Plunges Off High Embankment FREDONIA, Ariz., July An automobile, hurtling over an embankment Into a rock strewn canyon, brought death to seven per- sons, all members of a Tucson fam- ily, last night. Three-year-old Robert Blschoff was the sole occupant of the ma- chine to escape with his life. The dead were Robert's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Raeburn E. Blschoff, their three daughters, one grand- daughter and a woman less closely kin. The party was returning from a irip to Utah when the car went out of conf.rol on a steep, winding road. Black Threatens To Put G-Men On Trail Of Utilities Tycoon WASHINGTON, July (UK-Chairman Hugo Black abruptly broke In on senate lobby committee testimony today to declare he would put federal officers all over the country on the trail of Howard C. Hopson, reputed "master mind" of the vast associated gas and electric system, unless he appears soon for questioning. Exasperated with A. O. E. witnesses who could tell little of the system's expenditure of more than In fighting the utility bill, Black suddenly turned to Fred Burroughs, a vice-president In organization and snapped: "If Hop-un doesn't come In soon, we are going to have to turn over .a subpoena to every marshal in the States to bring him In here. Someone can do it." The warning to Hopson came as committee Investigators said their inspection of A. O. E. books showed It had spent at least In Its campaign to block the utilities legislation. Instead of the the company reported. Sen. Lewis B. Schwellenbacr, D., Wash., said expenditures included to the law firm of Hurley, secretary of war in the Hoover cabinet. It was not shown what work the firm did. Committee agents armed with i senate subpeona have been vainly hunting Hopeon, who reputedly received more than from A. Q. le E. companies during depression years. The committee has specific authority to enlist aid of the Justice department, under which United State Marshals operate. If the marshals could not llnd Hopson, See LOBBY PROBE, Face Col. 4 TEXAS FARM CONDITIONS ARE GOOD; DEPT. STORE SALES UP Dallas Federal Reserve Bank Review Optimistic; Favor- able Weather Boosts Outlook For Crops DALLAS, July notice- able Improvement In agricultural conditions, which lias engendered B. stronger undertone of confidence Ir. trade channels, and department store sale six per cent larger than In the corresponding month ol 1934, are the salients of the monthly business review of the Pede.'al Re- serve Bank of Dallas, released Mpn- day. Favorable weather and an ample supply of moisture In most areas, the review says, were responsible for the Improvement In the condi- tions of agriculture. The depart- ment of agriculture In its July 1, report, the review continues, esti- mated that tho production of most crops in this district during the cur- rent season will greatly exceed that of a year ago. This was partleuliily true feed cod the large supply now during the current season as well as provide ample feed generally for the cultivation of 1936 crops. The de- partment's estimate also reflected a moderate Increase In the area of cotton In cultivation July 1 as com- pared with that the same date last year. While the crop Is later than usual this year, the review explains, com- mercial reports indicate that have made good growth In recent weeks. Livestock and their ranges reflected a' further substantial 1m- piovement and conditions arc now materially better than a year ago. In the commercial the re- view points out that' department store sales, while reflecting a season- al decline of 13 per cent as com- pared with the previous month, were six per cent larger than in the same month of 1931, despite the fewer 80BVET, FMo CoL I Evelyn Smith Calmly Tells Of Butchering Body For CHICAGO, July Evelyn Smith, erstwhile burlesque strip dancer has signed a confes- sion taking full blame for the brutal "torso" murder of Ervin J. Lang, 28, assistant state's attorney ChMles S. Dougherty, said today. !Mrs. Smith, 46, once boxom showgirl but now a slight, muddy nonchalantly admitted she strangled the young grocery clerk to death after drugging him wltii drinks. "I bought a hacksaw at a neigh- borhood hardware Mrs. Smith told reporters after she had signed the confession. "After I found Ervin was dead I cut off lus help, "That was on Saturday night, July 5. I stayed alone all night In the apartment with the' body and then early Sunday Harry Jung (Mrs. Smith's dapper-Chinese hus- band) came with a car and we took the body to that swamp, "Mrs. Dunkel paid me and was to have paid me more for doing the Job." Mrs. Smith sought to exonerate her oriental husband, Jung. "Harry didn't have anything 'to do with she Insisted. "After I dumped the body into the marsh and hid the legs, Jung and I sep- See SLAYING, Page 9, Col. 8 I didn't have any I did it all alone." Co-op InMoveTo End Cotton Tieup Will File Motion To Exempt Co-operative Gins From Writ Provisions Severe Storm Batters China POOCHOW, July persons were reported Injured to- night as the severest, typhoon In many years struck Foochow. TOKYO, July A typhoon battered tlie Island of Formosa to- day, inflicting severe property dam- age as it roared on toward China. Communications were disrupted, preventing an accurate estimate of tile extent of the damage, but no loss of life was reported immedi- ately. Although there was comparatively little rainfall, the wind proved par- ticularly destructive. The central action of the Island was reported suffering extensively. The typhoon passed from Formosa at 5 a. m. An unesttmated number of houses was destroyed In closely populated areas, and banana and sugar planta- ;ions were damaged seriously. Train operations were halted. Communica- tion lines fell In many places. The third this sea- son and one of the worst ever to strike the Island, about BOO miles south of Japan off the coast of the capital city of Talhoku Into darkness today after ;he nslng winds damaged the power house. The city of Shlnchlku, which ex- perienced two disastrous earth- quakes earlier this year, also was hard hit. John G. Robinson, Circus Man, Dies CINCINNATI, July 30 (UP) _ John O. Rrblnson, Internationally known circus owner, died early to- day a.t his home here. Robinson had been ill for several months, suffering from a throat all- i ment. DALLAS, Texas, July a move designed to break the dead-lock threatening to tie up three fourths of the Texas cotton C. K. Bullard, attorney for the Texas Cotton Growers' Oin com-! Bounced today cooperative It to be'exempted from _______ETthreats to withhold cot- ton ginning Jags. Representing 40 cooperative gins throughput the state, Bullard said he planned to file a motion In the federal district court at Sherman asking that co-operative gins be exempted from the provisions of an Injunction restraining enforcement of the Bankhead cotton control act. The Injunction was granted July 19 by Federal Judge Randolph Bry- ant, on petition'of the Texas Cot- ton Glnners' Association. It re- strained government officials from collecting the cotton glnners' pro- cessing tax set up by the Bankhead act. Under, the act's provisions, gln- ners who collect the tax from farm- ers tag the cotton bales to signify the tax has been paid or that ex- emption, certificates have been is- sued to farmers 'who have not ex- ceeded cotton production quotas. Although the Injunction granted by Judge Bryant has not become operative, pending the filing of bond by the glnners, the bureau of Internal revenue has refused to Issue Bankhead tags. Glnners have accused the gov- ernment of attempting to bring pressure on them through farmers, in this manner, to bring about with- drawal of the suit enjoining the ginning tax, one of several process- ing levies set up under the Bank- head act and the AAA. July federal court paralyzing the movement of one-fourth of the na- tion's cotton crop has brought the Texas cotton advisory committee to Sec COTTON TAGS, Paje 9, Col. 6 PLANES TAKE OFF BROWNSVILLE, July Three Condor planes took off from here at p. m. today for Tem- Dlco. Mexico, on another leg of light from Chicago to Chile. WTU Co. District Mana- gers Addressed-By Operating Heads Annual fall "better service-bigger business" conference of West Texas Utilities company operating depart- ment heads and district managers was under way Tuesday morning. The session was held at the Lytle lake home of Price Campbell, pres- ident of the company. Addressing the group, Campbell and other home office officials said WTUCo personnel "should act as purchasing agents for customers. Instructing, them In the use and desirability of worthwhile labor-sav- ing appliances operated by electric- ity." Managers from the nine districts counties and 160 communities crop and business reports ranging from excellent to fair. The following district heads were pres- ent: the headquarters district, H. D. Austin, Abilene; P. P. Shepherd, Cisco; J. E. Brewer, Stamford; W. G. Owsley, Dai- hart; Ear] Morley, Quanah; W. O. Wallace, Balllngcr; M. E. Plttman, McCamey; H. M. Monk, Chlldress; Henry Bat- Jer, San Angelo. Soldier Hilled In Plane Crash City's Penalty On Speeding Is Boosted to Mimlnum fines of await Abllenlans who are convicted or who plead guilty In corporation court to speeding-, Judge Jas. P. StlnMn declared In court today. The Judge continued to say: "I'm tired of reports thai persons pleading giilUy lo speeding and receiving small fines continue to violate this or- dinance." No speeding cases were before the court today, but Monday the Judge amessed a fine H lew as SI on a plea of rillty to violation of the ordinance. Conviction fairies a fine of (1 (o 1100, City Attorney Wiley fey "Although leh ordi- nance acln the speed I will on Abilene tlreeti at 20 mo- torMo will not be checked by officer! unless exceeding a nue aft 30 he added. LAREDO, July ant 3. R. Stewart, pilot at Hensley field at Dallas, was under treat- ment today at a post hospital at Port Mclntosh for Injuries received yesterday In a plane crash that took the life of Private Otho Flippen, 25, also of Hensley field. The plane crashed three miles north of here from an altitude of about 800 feet. The filers wsre testing the ship with the view of buying It. Witnesses said it went into a flat spin. Lieutenant Stewart, who suffered a severe gash In the head, formerly was stationed at Brooks field at San Antonio and was at Hensley field as an Instructor. Formal Note Is Climax To Recent Furore Over Discrimination Against Jews WASHINGTON, July German govern- ment today presented a formal protest to the United States over the indignities to the Ger- man flag perpetrated by three communists aboard the liner Bremen in New York harbor last week. Note In German The protest was sent to the state department by Dr. Rudolf Leltrier, charge d'affaires of the German embassy, by messenger. The note was in the Qern-.ir, language and was sent Immediately to the trans- lation division of the state depart- ment. Fending translation, state department officials were unable to comment The protest was a climax In re- cent furore over alleged discrimi- nation against Jews and Catholics In Germany, which evoked speeches and resolutions by congressmen seeking to Investigate whether the United States should break off're- lations with the Hitler government. The flag Incident occurred when demonstrators against Hitler clash- ed with police aboard the giant liner Bremen in New York harbor shortly before the ship sailed for Germany. .r Anotlier of New York refusing a license to a German masseur on the grounds that Germany discriminated against .Americans. It was understood that the pro- test today dealt entirely with the flag Incident and did not take, up the case off the masseur. It was understood the note pro- tested that New York City authori- ties failed to give adequate police protection to the Bremen In the face of the threatening crowd. Three communists broke through the police lines and tore the Ger- man Nazi 
                            

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